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See detailCodifying ‘Sacred Laws’ in Ancient Greece
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg; Pirenne-Delforge, Vinciane ULg

in Jaillard, Dominique; Nihan, Christophe (Eds.) Legal Codification in Ancient Greece and Ancient Israel (in press)

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See detailSharing the Civic Sacrifice: Between Honorific Portions and Equal Division
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg; Paul, Stéphanie ULg

Conference (2014, January 18)

The granting of a sacrificial portion, much like dinner in the prytaneion (sitesis, deipnon), is one of the major benefits bestowed to recipients of Greek honorific and proxeny decrees, across all regions ... [more ▼]

The granting of a sacrificial portion, much like dinner in the prytaneion (sitesis, deipnon), is one of the major benefits bestowed to recipients of Greek honorific and proxeny decrees, across all regions and periods. Yet the highlighting of an individual over and above his peers runs to some extent counter to his inclusion into a citizenship or another form of civic parity. Various inscriptions attest to this sort of tension, which can in fact be viewed as representative of the dialectic between hierarchy and equality that is characteristic of Greek sacrifice: between gods and priests, for instance, or between priests and other worshippers. These relationships were articulated in all manner of sacrifices and civic feasts, from the offering of a divine portion on the altar or cult-table, to the attribution of priestly and honorific portions of meat which were anatomically related to this divine portion, and finally to the distribution of the remaining meat among the other participants (cp. Ekroth). Several important questions can be raised concerning honorific decrees and similar epigraphic materials: Why was a specific portion sometimes, albeit not usually, granted to honoured individuals in these texts? What did the difference between a generic portion or a priestly portion (a leg, an osphys, etc.) entail concerning the status of these honourees? Did it reflect only a local custom or rather a specific intention by the polis in recognising these individuals? And what were the practical and the conceptual differences between direct participation in a civic feast (such as a demothoinia, the civic banquet par excellence) and the sending (apostellein) of perquisites to honoured individuals absent from the feast? In the end, could a distribution of meat (dais, kreanomia) ever be truly "equal", regardless of what a polis might affirm to the contrary? This paper will explore these questions in a more systematic light than has been shed on them up to the present (Schmitt Pantel, Jacquemin). One of the implications will be a partial reconsideration of the prevalent notion of "equal" division (isomoiria) with regard to Greek sacrificial animals. Despite a rhetorical emphasis on commensality and equal sharing, some individuals in the polis were necessarily "more equal than others". In certain cases, the issue was simply the inclusion of a given honouree within the sacrificial community, while in others, the prerogatives at a feast were used to indicate a special status. From a realistic perspective, one can clearly see that the dialectical tension between sacrificial hierarchy and equality was a tool, which was expressed by the varying forms of commensality in civic feasts, and which could be moulded by the polis to suit its needs. [less ▲]

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See detailPriests and Cult Personnel in Three Hellenistic Families
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg; Pirenne-Delforge, Vinciane ULg

in Horster, Marietta; Klöckner, Anja (Eds.) Cities and Priests. Cult Personnel in Asia Minor and the Aegean Islands from the Hellenistic to the Imperial Period (2013)

This paper offers an examination of three significant familial inscriptions from the Hellenistic period. The texts are detailed cultic dossiers initiated by three individuals—Diomedon on Cos, Poseidonios ... [more ▼]

This paper offers an examination of three significant familial inscriptions from the Hellenistic period. The texts are detailed cultic dossiers initiated by three individuals—Diomedon on Cos, Poseidonios in Halicarnassus, and Epikteta on Thera. Though they are often very briefly grouped together, these inscriptions are discussed here in greater textual and contextual detail. In particular, the analysis focusses on the cult personnel, which is appointed in these families, demonstrating that it remains independent from the polis, but is organised with reference to a civic framework. By setting these inscriptions in parallel, the discussion opens up productive perspectives on the evolutions of familial cults in the Hellenistic period.—The inscription of Poseidonios is reedited in an Appendix by Jan-Mathieu Carbon. [less ▲]

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See detailRitual Problems: Offering and Sacrificing
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg

in Kernos : Revue Internationale et Pluridisciplinaire de Religion Grecque (2013), 26

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See detailMonographing "Sacred Laws"
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg

in Kernos : Revue Internationale et Pluridisciplinaire de Religion Grecque (2012), 25

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See detailBeyond Greek "Sacred Laws"
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg; Pirenne-Delforge, Vinciane ULg

in Kernos : Revue Internationale et Pluridisciplinaire de Religion Grecque (2012), 25

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See detailDΑΡΡΩΝ AND ΔΑΙΜΟΝ: A New Inscription from Mylasa
Carbon, Jan-Mathieu ULg

in Epigraphica Anatolica (2005)

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