References of "Camus, Gérard"
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See detailPancreatic cellular injury after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: Frequency, time course and risk factors
Nys, Monique ULg; Venneman, Ingrid ULg; Deby-Dupont, G. et al

in Shock (Augusta, Ga.) (2007), 27(5), 474-481

Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We ... [more ▼]

Although often clinically silent, pancreatic cellular injury (PCI) is relatively frequent after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass; and its etiology and time course are largely unknown. We defined PCI as the simultaneous presence of abnormal values of pancreatic isoamylase and immunoreactive trypsin (IRT). The frequency and time evolution of PCI were assessed in this condition using assays for specific exocrine pancreatic enzymes. Correlations with inflammatory markers were searched for preoperative risk factors. One hundred ninety-three patients submitted to cardiac surgery were enrolled prospectively. Blood IRT, amylase, pancreatic isoamylase, lipase, and markers of inflammation (alpha1-protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, myeloperoxidase) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively until day 8. The postoperative increase in plasma levels of pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT was biphasic in all patients: early after surgery and later (from day 4 to 8 after surgery). One hundred thirty-three patients (69%) experienced PCI, with mean IRT, isoamylase, and alpha1-protease inhibitor values higher for each sample than that in patients without PCI. By multiple regression analysis, we found preoperative values of plasma IRT >or=40 ng/mL, amylase >or=42 IU/mL, and pancreatic isoamylase >or=20 IU/L associated with a higher incidence of postsurgery PCI (P < 0.005). In the PCI patients, a significant correlation was found between the 4 pancreatic enzymes and urinary IRT, total calcium, myeloperoxidase, alpha1-protease inhibitor, and alpha2-macroglobulin. These data support a high prevalence of postoperative PCI after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, typically biphasic and clinically silent, especially when pancreatic enzymes were elevated preoperatively. [less ▲]

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See detailActivation of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophils during exercise-induced muscle damage
Camus, Gérard; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Chapelle, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Pflugers Arch – Eur J Physiol (2003, November), 447

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See detailDOMS : traitement ou prévention ?
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg et al

in Actes des 4èmes Journées Belges d’Isocinétisme (2003, October)

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See detailDelayed onset muscle soreness induced by eccentric isokinetic exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2003), 11(1), 21-29

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) follows unaccustomed muscular exercise, most notably in the eccentric mode. That concept refers to a dull ache combined with tenderness, stiffness and weakness of the ... [more ▼]

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) follows unaccustomed muscular exercise, most notably in the eccentric mode. That concept refers to a dull ache combined with tenderness, stiffness and weakness of the previously active muscles. lsokinetic device constitutes a specific model in generating and investigating DOMS. Respective effects of concentric and eccentric actions have been compared, emphasizing on the variability in the response (serum activity of CK for instance). The particular sensitivity of the hamstrings was underlined although causes remained unexplained. Some treatment have been proposed in the management of DOMS. Several studies reported that anti-inflammatory agents fail to alleviate pain and discomfort even if other authors indicated a relative effectiveness. Based on the repeated-bout effect, submaximal eccentric exercise currently represent the most useful preventive strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailIsokinetic evaluation of hip strength muscle groups in unilateral lower limb amputees
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Benoît ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg et al

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2001), 9(4), 163-169

The objectives of the study were to measure the isokinetic strength of the hip flexor-extensor and adductor-abductor muscle groups in unilateral lower limb amputees and to evaluate abnormalities in order ... [more ▼]

The objectives of the study were to measure the isokinetic strength of the hip flexor-extensor and adductor-abductor muscle groups in unilateral lower limb amputees and to evaluate abnormalities in order to improve the usual rehabilitation programs. Thirty-three patients with unilateral lower limb amputation were included in this study; they served as their own controls, the amputated side being compared to the intact side. Using an isokinetic device, the relative peak torques (N.m by body weight), bilateral asymmetries and agonist/antagonist torque ratios were calculated for the hip flexor, extensor, adductor and abductor muscle groups. A significant reduction of mean concentric relative peak torque measured on the amputated limbs was generally observed when compared to the intact contralateral limb (p < 0.05). The mean percentage of relative peak torque decrease was greater for the extensors than for the flexors (33 +/- 20% and 22 +/- 23%, respectively, at 30degrees/s angular velocity), and for the abductors than for the adductors (23 +/- 22% and 11 +/- 19%, respectively, at 30degrees/s angular velocity). Furthermore, the flexor/extensor torque ratio was significantly increased for the amputated limb (for instance, 1.25 +/- 0.33 versus 1.09 +/- 0.25 for the intact limb at 30degrees/s). The reduction of the abductor/adductor ratio of the operated limb reached the level of statistical significance at 60degrees/s only (1.25 +/- 0.46 versus 1.07 +/- 0.36 for the intact limb). In conclusion, isokinetic testing revealed a significant reduction of the hip stabilizing muscle strength as a consequence of lower limb amputation. The more marked decrease of the strength of the abductor and extensor muscle groups, resulting in imbalances of the agonist/antagonist strength ratios should be taken into account to adapt the conventional rehabilitation programs. [less ▲]

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See detailAspects délétères des épreuves isocinétiques de résistance à la fatigue musculaire
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Camus, Gérard et al

in Science & Sports (2000, December), 15

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See detailMuscle damage induced by concentric fatigue protocol. Comparative study between males and females
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Maquet, Didier ULg; Camus, Gérard et al

in Proceedings of the 5th Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science (2000, July)

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See detailInterest of a specific training to reduce DOMS
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2000, March), 8

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See detailIsokinetic evaluation of hip strength muscle groups in unilateral lower limb amputees
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Benoît; Camus, Gérard et al

in Isokinetics & Exercise Science (2000, March), 8

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See detailPotential effects of NSAID on myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg

in Actes du XIXe Congrès National de la Société Française de Médecine du Sport (1999, October)

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See detailEffects of training on delayed onset muscle soreness following isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Ledent, M. et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1999, September), 107(suppl september 1999), 101

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See detailLa relation force vitesse étudiée en isocinétisme
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Ledent, M. et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1998, September), 106(Suppl B), 70

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See detailExploration isocinétique de la relation tension longueur musculaire
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Ledent, M. et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1998, September), 106(Suppl B), 128

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See detailEffects of training on myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness following maximal isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Duchateau, J. et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (1997), 6

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See detailPiroxicam fails to reduce myocellular enzyme leakage and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Deby-Dupont, G. et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1996), 431

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See detailMyocellular Enzyme Leakage, Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation and Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Induced by Isokinetic Eccentric Exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Deby-Dupont, G. et al

in Archives of Physiology & Biochemistry (1996), 104(3), 322-9

To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product ... [more ▼]

To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle contractions. However, the hypothesized interplay between muscle damage, increased PGE2 production, DOMS sensations, and reduced isokinetic muscle performance was not substantiated by the present results. [less ▲]

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See detailMuscle damage and delayed muscular soreness induced by eccentric isokinetic exercise
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard; Deby-Dupont, C. et al

in Pflügers Archiv : European Journal of Physiology (1995), 429

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See detailInactivation of alpha(2)-Macroglobulin by Activated Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes.
Deby, Ginette ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Camus, Gérard et al

in Mediators of Inflammation (1994), 3(2), 117-23

The proteolytic activity of trypsin releases the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue from its high molecular weight substrate, the skin powder (Hide Powder Azure, Sigma), with an increase in absorbance at 595 nm ... [more ▼]

The proteolytic activity of trypsin releases the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue from its high molecular weight substrate, the skin powder (Hide Powder Azure, Sigma), with an increase in absorbance at 595 nm. Active alpha(2)- macroglobulin (80 mug/ml) totally inhibits the proteolytic activity of trypsin (14 mug/ml) by trapping this protease. But after a 20 min incubation of alpha(2)-macroglobulin at 37 degrees C with 2 x 10(6) human polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (10(-7) M) and cytochalasin B (10(-8) M), 100% of trypsin activity was recovered, indicating a total inactivation of alpha(2)-macroglobuHn. Incubation with granulocyte myeloperoxidase also inactivates alpha(2)-macroglobulin. Hypochlorous acid, a by-product of myeloperoxidase activity, at a concentration of 10(-7) M also inactivates alpha(2)-macroglobulin, which indicates that an important cause of alpha(2)-macroglobulin inactivation by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes could be the activity of myeloperoxidase. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between blood lactate concentration and speed in front crawl swimming
Feron, Frédéric ULg; Laurent, Luc; Tomasella, Marco ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1990), 98(5), 59

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