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See detailLes volatils racinaires de l’orge : un langage souterrain ?
Barsics, Fanny ULg; Gfeller, Aurélie ULg; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, October 13)

Cette présentation résume les avancées du projet Rhizovol après une année de travaux de recherche.

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See detailVolatile organic compounds of the roots of barley and their role in the rhizosphere
Fiers, Marie ULg; Barsics, Fanny ULg; Camerman, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 24)

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates ... [more ▼]

Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are known to intervene with various biotic environmental factors. Up to now, most of the studies have been focused on aerial volatiles and root liquid exudates. Very few researches have been completed concerning belowground volatiles released into the rhizosphere despite their potential capacity to carry information between organisms. The Rhizovol project, started in autumn 2010, involves 5 different units of Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech collectively studying the production of belowground volatiles by barley roots underlying various biotic interactions in the rhizosphere. Some preliminary results of each partner of the project will be presented. To achieve this goal, analytical methods allowing the sampling, separation, identification and quantification of belowground volatile compounds have to be developed, taking into account their potential modifications in the rhizosphere once released by the roots. They enable the subsequent characterization and study of the interactions between barley and its rhizospheric partners chosen for this study. These interactions imply three types of organisms: beneficial organisms, pathogenic agents and plant and insect pests. Beneficial organisms can promote the growth of barley by the emission of volatiles; on the other hand barley can support their growth and metabolism. These phenomenons will be assessed by the study of 19 strains of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPR). Three pathogenic agents - two fungi (Fusarium culmorum and Cochliobolus sativus) and one virus (Barley yellow dwarf virus) - were chosen as they are known to cause various diseases on barley, especially on roots. The attractive or repellent effects of barley root volatiles on the pathogenic agents or their vectors, as well as the effect of volatiles on the diseases evolution will be evaluated. The project also includes several types of pests such as plants and insects. Plants can compete with barley for space and nutrients through volatile interactions. This will be assessed by the study of autotoxicity by barley itself and allelopathy with 8 weeds and a hemiparasitic plant (Rhinanthus minor). The effects of barley volatiles can also impact the severity of the attacks by insects. This part will be conducted with wireworms as they represent worldwide known pests, and aphids, through their viral vector role. Eventually, as soil characteristics can strongly influence the diffusion of volatile compounds, the diffusion behaviour of the identified volatile biomolecules through the soil will be modelled. Tritrophic interactions (e.g. insect-plant-pathogenic fungi) will be studied based on each bitrophic interaction results. Over-all, the Rhizovol project aims at improving the knowledge of interactions mediated by volatile compounds in the rhizosphere and at establishing new biocontrol methods that could contribute to integrated disease and pest management systems. [less ▲]

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