References of "CROISIER, Jean-Louis"
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See detailTendinopathies chroniques et Plasma Riche en Plaquettes
KAUX, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014)

Platelets contain growth factors released during their degranulation following activation. These growth factors promote tissue remodeling, wound healing and angiogenesis. Currently, the clinical effect of ... [more ▼]

Platelets contain growth factors released during their degranulation following activation. These growth factors promote tissue remodeling, wound healing and angiogenesis. Currently, the clinical effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is still discussed or even controversial. Our researches have evaluated the effectiveness of PRP on the healing of animal tendons and human suffering from chronic jumper's knee. [less ▲]

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See detailEccentric training for elbow hypermobility
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Delvaux, François ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 154

Background: Patients with hypermobility suffer from joints problems and chronic pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Objective: Eccentric muscle strengthening could be very important to protect ... [more ▼]

Background: Patients with hypermobility suffer from joints problems and chronic pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Objective: Eccentric muscle strengthening could be very important to protect hypermobile joints. Design: Case report. Patient: A girl (16 y.o.) affected by an Ehler-Danlos syndrome presented pain in the right elbow and the right wrist after a season of tennis. Interventions: Her training consisted of wrist prono-supination and flexion-extension muscle group reinforcement and proprioceptive training. To protect the wrist against excessive load, the eccentric strengthening exercises of prono-supinator and flexor-extensor muscles of elbow and wrist were undertaken gradually, at increasing speeds within a limited range of motion in flexion and extension, on an isokinetic device after an evaluation. She was also given an orthesis restricting the joint range of motion of the wrist. Main outcome measurements: The evaluation was made by isokinetic evaluation, visual analog scale and MOS-SF36 questionnaire before and after training. Results: The patient rapidly noted a decrease in pain and an increase in the stability of her right arm even when playing tennis. Isokinetic evaluation objectified a significant improvement in maximal torque in flexion-extension muscles of the right elbow. She was also given individualized home exercises. Conclusions: The goal of this eccentric training is to avoid hypermobility by using the muscles as a protective brake in the control of joint positioning. Muscles can be reinforced in eccentric mode with starting position at the maximum length of these muscles when unstreched. The exercises can be carried out safely on an isokinetic device, at slow speed and limited range of joint motion to avoid risk of luxation. Thus, in this case report, the eccentric exercises using an isokinetic device were effective to safely reinforce the muscles as a protective brake for joint hypermobility and prevent pain during practicing tennis. [less ▲]

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See detailEccentric training improves tendon biomechanical properties: a rat model
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Drion, Pierre ULg; Libertiaux, Vincent et al

in British Journal of Sports Medicine (2014, April), 48(7), 155

Background: Even if eccentric exercises appear favourable in primary prevention of tendons lesions and, especially, in secondary prevention after tendinopathy, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are ... [more ▼]

Background: Even if eccentric exercises appear favourable in primary prevention of tendons lesions and, especially, in secondary prevention after tendinopathy, the biomechanical changes to the tissue are not yet clear. Objective: We aimed to better define the biomechanical changes that affect healthy tendon after eccentric and concentric training. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Participants: Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats of 2 months. Interventions: The six rats in the control group (U) were not subjected to physical exercise. The 12 remaining rats (6 in each group) ran on a treadmill set at a +15° incline for concentric training (C) or a -15° incline for eccentric training (E), at a speed of 17 m/min for 1 h, three times per week for 5 weeks. Main Outcome Measurements: The tricipital, patellar and Achilles tendons were subsequently removed to perform a traction test until rupture, and a histological analysis was performed. Results: There was a significant improvement in the rupture force of the patellar and tricipital tendons between the U and E groups. The tricipital tendons in the control group presented a significantly smaller cross-section than the E- and C-trained groups, but none between E and C groups. No significant difference was observed for the mechanical stress at rupture per surface unit between the three groups for all three tendons. However, a tendency towards improvement these values was observed between the trained and the U groups for the patellar tendon. Histological studies demonstrated the tendency of the development of a greater number of blood vessels and a larger quantity of collagen in the eccentric group. Conclusions: The mechanical properties of tendons in rats improve after specific training, especially following eccentric training. Our results partly explained how mechanical loading, especially in eccentric mode, could improve the tendon structure. [less ▲]

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See detailRevue épidémiologique des blessures lors de la pratique du rugby à XV
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Julia, Marc; Chupin, Marie et al

in Journal de Traumatologie du Sport (2014), 31(1), 49-53

Rugby is an increasingly popular sport. Full contact being a major characteristic of rugby, injuries are not uncommon. The incidence of injury in Rugby Union reaches 30–91 per 1,000 hours of game time ... [more ▼]

Rugby is an increasingly popular sport. Full contact being a major characteristic of rugby, injuries are not uncommon. The incidence of injury in Rugby Union reaches 30–91 per 1,000 hours of game time. This epidemiological review of injuries in rugby players reports their localization, nature, causes, moment of occurrence in matches and seasonal trends as well as the influence of the player’s position, field conditions, and duration of off time after injury. [less ▲]

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See detailExuberant inflammatory reaction as a side effect of platelet-rich plasma infiltration for treating one case of tendinopathy
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine (2014), 24(2), 150-152

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance tendon healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively new treatment for tendinopathies. To ... [more ▼]

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains a large quantity of growth factors, which may enhance tendon healing processes. Local infiltration of PRP represents a relatively new treatment for tendinopathies. To date, no side effects have been reported after infiltration of PRP to treat tendinopathy. We reported a case of exuberant inflammatory reaction after one infiltration of PRP to treat jumper’s knee in a type 1 diabetic patient who was 35 years old. Injections of PRP must be proposed after careful consideration for patients with morbidity risks linked to insulin-dependent diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailIsocinétisme : aspects spécifiques chez le sportif
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Kinésithérapie Scientifique (2014), 550

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See detailExperimental Study of the Human Ability to Deliberately Excite a Flexible Floor
Schwartz, Cédric ULg; Berger, Alexis; Bruls, Olivier ULg et al

in Zingoni, Alphose (Ed.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Structural Engineering, Mechanics and Computation (2014)

Human-structure interactions are not completely understood yet. This paper presents an experimental study focusing on the interaction between a human and a flexible support, with a major aim to better ... [more ▼]

Human-structure interactions are not completely understood yet. This paper presents an experimental study focusing on the interaction between a human and a flexible support, with a major aim to better understand how the behavior of a human subject, bouncing on a flexible structure, adapts to the support motion. Exploratory experiments are undertaken with a 7m-span timber footbridge tested in the Human Motion Analysis Laboratory of the University of Liege. The movements of the coupled system composed of the subject and the footbridge are recorded by Motion Capture technology; the subject\textquoteright{}s 3-D body motion is defined by three important angles: ankle, knee and hip. The interaction between the subject and the footbridge is also quantified by means of force platform measurements. The experiments indicate an influence of the support amplitude and natural frequency on the phase shift between the oscillatory floor motion and the three angles characterizing the motion. [less ▲]

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See detailIsocinétisme et douleurs musculaires d’apparition retardée
Hody, Stéphanie ULg; ROGISTER, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité (2014)

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce ... [more ▼]

The curative and preventive efficiency of the isokinetic exercise, especially of the eccentric contraction, has been well demonstrated. However, intense or unusual eccentric exercise is known to induce muscle damage associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and prolonged functional deficits. These negative consequences can frequently disturb the progress of re-education or training programmes. Since they can affect athletic performance and increase the risk of musculo-skeletal injuries, the structuro-functional alterations associated with DOMS may also be problematic in athletes. Therefore, to optimize the benefits of the eccentric work while avoiding muscle damage and occurrence of DOMS should represent a major objective for the practitioners. To date, the only systematic intervention that brings muscle protection against DOMS consists of performing repeated eccentric sessions at submaximal intensity. Besides its clinical use, isokinetic constitutes an interesting model to generate and investigate the DOMS phenomenon. The original association of eccentric injuring protocols with new emerging techniques of molecular biology appears to be a promising strategy to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying exercise-induced muscle damage. Such data would provide better guidelines for prevention or treatment practice. [less ▲]

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See detail3D analysis of gait using accelerometer measurements
Boutaayamou, Mohamed ULg; Schwartz, Cédric ULg; Stamatakis, Julien et al

Scientific conference (2013, November 07)

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See detailLa qualité de force relative : paramètre sous-exploité ?
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Delvaux, François ULg; Cordonnier, Caroline ULg et al

in Livret des interventions - XVèmes Rencontres Médimex - "Isocinétisme - Actualités et Controverses" (2013, November)

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See detailRééducation des plasties du LCA : quels pièges ?
Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; BAUVIR, Philippe ULg; NAMUROIS, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Abstract Book du Symposium d'Axxon - Actualité en Kinésithérapie (2013, November)

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See detailLe mode excentrique appliqué aux rotateurs d'épaule
Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg; Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Crielaard, Jean-Michel ULg et al

in Livret des interventions - XVèmes Rencontres Médimex - "Isocinétisme - Actualités et Controverses" (2013, November)

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See detailStrength improvement after 3months of resistance training among Parkinson's disease patients
Demonceau, Marie ULg; rodriguez de la cruz, carlos; NAVEAU, Florence ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013, October), 56(s1), 196

Objectives.– To assess the feasibility and the effects of a strengthening program for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods.– Fourteen patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage [1] < III of PD were ... [more ▼]

Objectives.– To assess the feasibility and the effects of a strengthening program for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods.– Fourteen patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage [1] < III of PD were allocated to either 24 sessions of strength training (ST group; n = 8) or to a control group (C group; n = 6) for 3 months. Concentric knee muscle strength and a maximal cycling incremental test were performed at baseline and after training. Training consisted of progressive resistive exercises on leg press, leg extension, leg curl, between 50 and 80% of 1RM and was completed by non-instrumented exercises for trunk and upper limbs muscles. Anxiety, depression and quality of life were assessed using questionnaires. An Anova for repeated measures was used for statistical analysis. Results.– Six patients of the ST group (75%) fully completed the program. There were significant “group by time” effects for all knee muscles strength measures of less involved side (P < 0.05). A significant “group by time” effect was also found for knee flexors of the most involved side, but only at angular speed of 180°/s (P = 0.03). Patients of ST group also increased maximal aerobic power (+13%) whereas patients of C group decreased their performances (–9%; “group by time” effect, P = 0.04). No changes in anxiety, depression or quality of life could be highlighted. Conclusions.– The increase of some strength measures in ST group showed that progressive strength training counteracts strength decrease among people with Parkinson's disease. Strengthening also had a positive effect on maximal aerobic power. [less ▲]

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See detailActualités thérapeutiques dans la prise en charge des tendinopathies
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Forthomme, Bénédicte ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013, October), 56(Sup 1), 050-003

“Conventional” treatments of tendinopathies are generally employed empirically to fight pain and inflammation but they do not modify the histological structure of the tendon. However, these treatments are ... [more ▼]

“Conventional” treatments of tendinopathies are generally employed empirically to fight pain and inflammation but they do not modify the histological structure of the tendon. However, these treatments are not completely satisfactory and the recurrence of symptoms is common. In contrast to the passive pattern of many therapies dedicated to tendon disorders, some authors have promoted an eccentric training mode. Such active eccentric training programs are aimed at thwarting an aetiopathogenic theory proposing insufficient tensile strength of the tendon exposed to external loads which could progressively damage it. Though the literature remains incomplete on tendon architecture remodelling and real histological adaptations following an adapted eccentric training, clinical results following such therapy appear promising. Due to its noninvasiveness, low complication rate and high applicability combined with good results, extracorporeal shock wave therapy has become a well known option within the therapeutic spectrum for many tendinopathies. More specifically, it has been successfully applied in chronic tendinopathy resistant to a conservative training program including eccentric exercises. Platelets release different cytokines and growth factors that could promote angiogenesis, tissue remodelling (bone, skin etc.), and wound healing. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is obtained by centrifuging autologous blood to have a high concentration of platelets depending on the isolation method. For this reason, different PRP preparation techniques cannot provide a consistently identical final product, but there is currently no international consensus on this issue. Despite the proven efficacy of PRP tissue regeneration in labs, there is currently little tangible clinical evidence for chronic tendon disorders. The few studies that have been performed appear unlikely to be comparable. Up to now, randomised controlled studies with appropriate placebo groups are needed to determine the real effectiveness of PRP for treating chronic tendon conditions. However, this therapeutic option remains very popular in sports, and many top athletes are using it in case of musculoskeletal conditions. What is more, it has been removed from the doping lost of the World AntiDoping Agency. Other new therapeutic options (infiltrations of polidocanol, hyaluronic acid, botulinum toxin, patches of derivatives Nitro...) for treating tendinopathies are also discussed in this review. [less ▲]

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See detailRéaction inflammatoire exubérante comme effet secondaire d’une infiltration de PRP
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; LEONARD, Philippe ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013, October), 56(Sup 1), 068

Introduction : Infiltrations of plasma rich platelets (PRP) represent a new treatment of tendinopathies. Currently, no side effects were reported in this indication. Case report: We report the case of a ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Infiltrations of plasma rich platelets (PRP) represent a new treatment of tendinopathies. Currently, no side effects were reported in this indication. Case report: We report the case of a 35-year-old type 1 diabetic patient with right upper patellar tendinopathy that had persisted for more than 6 months. The patient benefited from an intratendinous infiltration of 6 mL of PRP (8.105 platelets/mm3, almost no red or white blood cells) after a carefully disinfection but without local anesthesia. Typically, a standardized program of sub-maximal eccentric rehabilitation should be started 1 week after infiltration. However, the patient experienced local swelling with erythema, increased heating and pain, which appeared just underneath the patella, without biological inflammatory syndrome. In absence of septic general symptoms, no blood or wound culture were made. At 2 weeks post-infiltration, a greatly increased Doppler signal in a thicker tendon was observed by ultrasounds compared to that before infiltration, but there was no sign of infection demonstrated by either MRI or CT. However, the local inflammation did not decrease after a 3-week treatment of local cryotherapy, local and oral NSAID, and adjunct use of colchicine 1 mg. Thus, an insidious infection was suspected, even though there was no evidence of biological inflammatory syndrome or sign of infectious lesion on imagery examination. Antibiotic therapy (rifampicine 600 mg + minocycline 100 mg), was initiated for three months. Due to a lack of improvement via imaging and clinical examination, a 3-phase bone scintigraphy was performed. The results suggested the presence of a complex regional pain syndrome type 1. The patient benefited from classical physical therapy and concomitant pain killers. The evolution was favorable after 6 months of treatment. Discussion : Even though PRP infiltration represents a new and promising treatment for tendinopathy, more studies are needed both to verify its clinical efficacy. Moreover, implementing this innovative treatment requires caution because of potential adverse events. Thus, the balance between benefits and risks must be carefully evaluated before using this treatment, especially in patients with type 1 diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailUne infiltration de plasma riche en plaquettes (PRP) pour traiter les tendinopathies rotuliennes supérieures chroniques
Kaux, Jean-François ULg; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg et al

in Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2013, October), 56(Sup 1),

Objective: Jumper’s knee is a frequent chronic overuse syndrome of the upper part of the patellar tendon. Platelets contain lots of growth factors which could enhance the healing process of tendons ... [more ▼]

Objective: Jumper’s knee is a frequent chronic overuse syndrome of the upper part of the patellar tendon. Platelets contain lots of growth factors which could enhance the healing process of tendons. Infiltration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could be a new therapy for such chronic tendinopathies. Materiel and methods: Twenty patients with chronic upper patellar tendinopathy were enrolled. Assessments were made before infiltration of PRP, and 6 weeks and 3 months after the infiltration, using a 10-point Visual Analogic Scale, clinical examinations with a pressure algometer, algofunctional scores (IKDC and VISA-P), functional assessments (isokinetic and optojump evaluations) and imagery (ultrasounds and MRI). The PRP was obtained with an apheresis system (COM.TEC, Fresenius). Six millilitres of PRP were injected without local anaesthetic. One week after infiltration, patients started a standardised sub-maximal eccentric reeducation. Results: Pain during daily activities significantly decreased with time (especially after 6 weeks and continued to a lesser extend up to 3 months). During functional evaluation, it decreased as well, but without significant functional improvement. No improvements in the imagery measurements were observed. Younger patients seemed to be more susceptible to have an improvement of pain by the PRP infiltration. Discussion: This study demonstrates that a local infiltration of PRP associated with a submaximal eccentric protocol is efficient to improve symptoms of chronic jumper’s knee in patients non-responsive to classical conservative treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailProteomic study of lumbar spinal cord after quadricipital eccentric exercise
Lacrosse, Zoé ULg; Hody, Stéphanie ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2013, September 12)

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” ... [more ▼]

Eccentric muscle contractions are characterized by an increase of muscle tension as it lengthens (slowering movements). Unaccustomed or intense eccentric exercise causes “Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness” (DOMS). DOMS include muscle pain that appears 24 to 72 hours after exercise, but also stiffness, edema and muscle proteins release in plasma as a hallmark of muscle fibers injuries. The only systematic intervention that brings a muscle protection against DOMS is to realize submaximal eccentric contractions with a progressively increased intensity. The mechanism of this protection, called the “Repeated Bout Effect” (RBE), is not understood. However, it is likely explained by cellular, mechanical and neural theories [Scand.J.Med.&Sci.Sports, 13, 88, 2003]. The objective of this study is to better understand which neural signal is released in the muscle synapse and which brings protection by RBE. Male adult mice (C57BL6) were randomly divided into downhill running (DHR), uphill running (UHR) and untrained control (CONT) groups (n=4/group). DHR group is characterized by eccentric contractions of the quadriceps while UHR is concerned by concentric contractions. Running groups performed a warm-up of ten minutes followed by an interval exercise on an inclined treadmill at a velocity of 20cm/s. The latter consisted of running 18 bouts of 5 minutes interspersed with a 2 minutes rest. Lumbar spinal cord was dissected 24h after the race. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were separately extracted and subjected to a 2D-DIGE analysis coupled with mass spectrometry. We do not observe any cytoplasmic protein modification while in the nuclear extract, seven spots were more abundant in eccentric group and four in concentric group in comparison with control group. The mass spectrometry of these proteins reveals that they are implicated in axoplasmic transport. At 24 hours, too few proteins modifications were detected in lumbar spinal cord, maybe as a consequence of a too short period between race and euthanasia. Implication of axoplasmic transport comforts our starting hypothesis that nervous system is able to protect muscle during the RBE by a synthesis and then a synaptic release of molecules modifying the muscle physiology. [less ▲]

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