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See detailMorphometric analyses of the normal suspensory ligament in Standardbreds
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

Poster (2013, July)

The suspensory ligament (SL) is composed of connective tissue (CT) with a variable proportion of muscle (MT) and adipose tissue (AT). The aim of our study is to quantify the CT, MT and AT within the SL in ... [more ▼]

The suspensory ligament (SL) is composed of connective tissue (CT) with a variable proportion of muscle (MT) and adipose tissue (AT). The aim of our study is to quantify the CT, MT and AT within the SL in sound horses. Right limbs from 11 horses were collected. Samples from 6 levels of the SL were embedded in paraffin or in Tissue-Tek®. Most of the paraffin sections were shredded. Using the cryosection, some artefacts appeared. Cryoprotection was carried out, which produced the best results. Hematoxylin–phloxine–saffron and Hematoxylin–eosin gave a good contrast of colours between the tissues allowing the use of an image analysis programme. The percentage of MT and AT decreased significantly (P < 0.0001), whereas the percentage of CT increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with age and when descending from the proximal to the distal level of the SL. The percentage of MT was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in females than males, while the percentage of CT was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in males than females. The percentage of AT was significantly higher (P = 0.0278) in pelvic limbs than in thoracic limbs. These results confirm the variation in tissue composition within the SL of sound horses. [less ▲]

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See detailUltrasonographic characteristics of the cisterna chyli in eight dogs and four cats
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg; Cavrenne, Romain ULg; Gommeren, Kris ULg et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2013), 54(4), 398-402

Ultrasonography of the cisterna chyli has been used in humans to diagnose increased lymphatic flow or lymph flow obstruction and to guide percutaneous embolization of the thoracic duct via the cisterna ... [more ▼]

Ultrasonography of the cisterna chyli has been used in humans to diagnose increased lymphatic flow or lymph flow obstruction and to guide percutaneous embolization of the thoracic duct via the cisterna chyli. The aim of this study was to describe the ultrasonographic characteristics of the dorsal portion of cisterna chyli in dogs and cats with chylous ascites or chylothorax and in a group of healthy dogs and cats. The aorta and the cranial mesenteric artery were used as anatomic landmarks. Ultrasonography was performed before and 2 h after a fatty meal in healthy dogs and cats. The visualized structure was confirmed to be a dilated cisterna chyli at necropsy in a dog with chylous ascites. The confirmed or presumed cisterna chyli was consistently detected using ultrasonography in nonfasted healthy animals and clinically affected animals and appeared as an anechoic tubular structure, without detectable flow, at the right dorsolateral aspect of the aorta. It had a similar ultrasonographic appearance in patients with chyloabdomen and in nonfasted healthy dogs and cats. There was considerable overlap in diameters of the cisterna chyli for affected and healthy animals. The shape and size of the cisterna chyli in an individual animal were variable during the same ultrasound examination and between different examinations. This study demonstrated the appearance of the presumed dorsal portion of the cisterna chyli by ultrasonography and might provide useful preliminary data for further studies into the feasibility of ultrasound-guided injections or aspirations of the cisterna chyli in dogs and cats. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphometric analyses of the body and the branches of the normal third interosseous muscle (suspensory ligament) in Standardbreds
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

in Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia (2013)

The third interosseous muscle (suspensory ligament, TIOM) is composed of connective tissue (CT) with a variable proportion of muscle (MT) and adipose tissue (AT). The aim of our study is to quantify the ... [more ▼]

The third interosseous muscle (suspensory ligament, TIOM) is composed of connective tissue (CT) with a variable proportion of muscle (MT) and adipose tissue (AT). The aim of our study is to quantify the CT, MT and AT within the body and the branches of right thoracic and pelvic limbs TIOM in sound horses to determine whether there are differences in CT, MT and AT between age, sex, limbs and levels. Right limbs from 11 sound horses were collected. Samples from 6 levels of the TIOM were embedded in paraffin or in Tissue-Tek®. Most of the paraffin sections were shredded. Using the cryosection, some artefacts appeared. Cryoprotection was carried out, which produced the best results. Hematoxylin–phloxine–saffron and Hematoxylin–eosin gave a good contrast of colours between the tissues observed allowing the use of an image analysis programme to calculate percentage of each tissue within the TIOM. The percentage of MT and AT decreased significantly (P < 0.0001), whereas the percentage of CT increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with age and when descending from the proximal to the distal level of the TIOM. The percentage of MT was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in females than males, while the percentage of CT was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in males than females. The percentage of AT was significantly higher (P = 0.0278) in pelvic limbs than in thoracic limbs. These results confirm the variation in tissue composition within the TIOM of sound horses. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphological and morphometric analyses of the suspensory ligament in Standardbreds
Shikh Al Sook, Mohamad Khir ULg; Antoine, Nadine ULg; Piret, Joëlle ULg et al

Poster (2012, October)

Ultrasound techniques allow examination of some parts of the suspensory ligament (SL) but "anomalies" are regularly observed. Their significance is not known. Few studies have described the relationship ... [more ▼]

Ultrasound techniques allow examination of some parts of the suspensory ligament (SL) but "anomalies" are regularly observed. Their significance is not known. Few studies have described the relationship between ultrasonographic appearance and the exact morphology in histological sections. The aim of this study is to develop good techniques for cutting, staining, and showing the variation in the tissue composition within the SL. The SLs from the right limbs of 11 horses were collected. Samples were taken from cross-sections at six levels of the SL and they were embedded in paraffin or in Tissue-Tek®. Most of the paraffin sections were shredded. By using the cryosection technique, some freezing artifacts (holes) appeared. Therefore, a technique of freezing with cryoprotection was carried out, which produced the best results. Hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron gives a good contrast of colors between the tissues observed allowing the use of an image analysis program. The percentage of each tissue within the SL for each section and for six levels of the ligament was calculated. Results were analyzed by SAS software. The muscle tissue (PMT) and adipose tissue (PAT) decreased significantly (p < 0.0001), whereas the connective tissue (PCT) increased significantly (p < 0.0001) with age and when descending from the proximal to the distal level of the SL. The PMT was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in females than males, while the PCT was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in males than females. The PAT was significantly higher (p = 0.0278) in hindlimbs than in forelimbs. [less ▲]

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See detailUltrasonography of the collateral ligaments of the distal interphalangeal joint in horses: technique and reference images
Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Maquet, Nathalie et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2012), 32(9), 584-589

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See detailComparison of the sedative and hemodynamic effects of acepromazine and promethazine in the standing horse.
Pequito, Manuel; Amory, Hélène ULg; Serteyn, Didier ULg et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2012), 32(12), 1-6

The objective of this study was to compare the sedative and peripheral hemodynamic effects of acepromazine (ACP) and promethazine (PTZ) in the standing healthy horse. Nine healthy Warmblood horses ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to compare the sedative and peripheral hemodynamic effects of acepromazine (ACP) and promethazine (PTZ) in the standing healthy horse. Nine healthy Warmblood horses randomly received either intravenous ACP at 0.1 mg/kg or PTZ at 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mg/kg. A sedation score based on clinical examination was recorded, and systolic arterial blood pressure was noninvasively evaluated using a Doppler flow detector at the tail, just before and every 15 minutes until 60 minutes after drug injection. Hemodynamics of the median artery of the left forelimb was studied using Doppler ultrasonography just before and 45 minutes after injection of the drug, which allowed calculation of surface (SURF), diameter (DIAM), and circumference (CIRC) of the vessel and peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean velocity (MV), volumetric flow (VF), and resistivity index (RI) of the blood flow. Regardless of the dose used, PTZ had lesser sedative and hypotensive effects than ACP at 0.1 mg/kg and did not induce significant variations in SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV, VF, and RI of the studied standing horses. Conversely, the vasodilatory properties of ACP were illustrated by a significant increase in SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV, and VF and a significant reduction of the RI. Unlike ACP, PTZ did not induce alterations on the morphology of the Doppler waveform. PTZ appears to have less sedative and peripheral vasodilator effects than ACP, thus it could be safer than ACP in patients suffering from hypotension. [less ▲]

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See detailIMAGING FINDINGS IN HORSES WITH PHARYNGEAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg; Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg et al

Poster (2012)

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material ... [more ▼]

Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has been occasionally reported in the equine pharyngeal region1-3. The aim of this poster is to describe imaging findings in 4 cases of pharyngeal SCC. Material and methods Four old horses, mean age 19.5, 2 females and 2 geldings, were referred for dyspnea (3/4) and/or dysphagia (3/4). Because of dyspnea radiographs were realized prior to endoscopy. Ultrasound (US) was performed in all cases by ventral and lateral approach using a linear 7,5MHz transducer. A post-mortem computed tomography (CT) of the head was performed in one case (16 slices CT, Somatom 16, Siemens). Results Radiographic opacity of the pharyngeal region was increased in all cases. A soft tissue mass was also visible in the caudal maxillary sinus in 1 horse. The epiglottis was either not recognized or difficult to see with an abnormal shape. Pharyngoepiglottic distance and nasopharyngeal diameter were reduced in all cases. The soft palate was either thick or impossible to be outlined, with an irregular surface. In 1 case it was dorsally displaced. The dorsal pharyngeal wall looked unevenly thickened or impossible to be outlined ventrally due to border effacement. No bony damage was identified on radiographs. A hypoechoic heterogeneous mass was visualized at US in 2 cases and an enlargement of the mandibular lymph nodes was observed in 3 cases. Lymphnodes had also heterogeneous echogenicity and increased doppler signal in 1 case. Oral and pharyngeal endoscopic examination confirmed a pharyngeal mass in 2 cases but was unsuccessful or incomplete because of passage impairment in 2. CT revealed maxillary bone lysis in the horse with a mass in the maxillary sinus. Histopathological examination of local biopsies or necropsy revealed pharyngeal SCC invading epiglottis, pharyngeal wall and soft palate in the 4 horses and the maxillary sinus in one. Discussion/Conclusion Because endoscopy can be impaired by the size of the mass, radiology is helpful in estimating the extent and invasiveness of the process and US to confirm lymphadenopathy. However because of its relatively low sensitivity and the local increased opacity, radiographic examination may underestimate bone lysis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe diagnostic value of equine rectal and duodenal biopsies.
Tossens, Morgane; Borde, Laura ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2012), 26(2), 430-431

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See detailInvestigation of the best suture pattern to close a stuffed Christmas turkey
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Busoni, Valeria ULg; Van Galen, Gaby ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2011), 169(26), 685-686

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See detailTheoretical discrepancy between cage size and efficient tibial tuberosity advancement in dogs treated for cranial cruciate ligament rupture
Etchepareborde, Sébastien ULg; Mills; Busoni, Valeria ULg et al

in Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology (2011), 24

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See detailImpact of successive freezing-thawing cycles on 3-T magnetic resonance images of the digits of isolated equine limbs
Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Haye, Dimitri; Dondelinger, Robert ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2011), 72(6), 780-790

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of freezing and thawing on MR images of equine feet examined ex vivo. Nine equine cadaver digits were first imaged at room temperature (T0). Among the 9 ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of freezing and thawing on MR images of equine feet examined ex vivo. Nine equine cadaver digits were first imaged at room temperature (T0). Among the 9 digits, 3 (group 1) were imaged in a 3 Tesla MR system after one and after 2 freezing-thawing cycles. Digits of group 1 were thawed in a cold room at 4°C for 36h. Three other digits (group 2) were imaged after one freezing-thawing cycle. Digits of group 2 were thawed in a cold room at 4°C and then rescanned after 24h at room temperature. The last 3 digits (group 3) were scanned after one freezing-thawing cycle. Digits of group 3 were thawed at room temperature for 24h. Sequences used were Spin Echo (SE) T1, Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) T2 and proton density (PD), Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR), Double Echo Steady State (DESS), 3D Gradient Echo (GE) T1 and 2D GE T2*. Images obtained on the fresh limbs at room temperature were subjectively compared side by side to images obtained at the different freezing-thawing cycles. A quantitative analysis to assess signal change between examinations was realized by measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR). Visibility and margination of the anatomical structures of the foot and overall image quality were subjectively considered unchanged except for the hoof where the lamina was considered less visible distally after freezing and thawing in the GE T2* and in TSE T2 and PD sequences. Quantitative analysis demonstrated SNR changes in the bone marrow only in the distal phalanx in the SE T1 sequence when the feet were thawed at room temperature. When the feet were thawed in a cold room at 4°C, bone marrow SNR changes were present in the SE T1, GE T1 and TSE PD sequences. Signal changes were significant in the synovial recess when the thawing process was made at 4°C and not when the thawing process was at ambient temperature. The soft tissue structures and the hoof capsule showed significant changes with an increase of SNR, except in STIR, after freezing and thawing at 4°C and at room temperature. SNR changes in the soft tissues were mainly present in GE sequences. [less ▲]

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See detailReversal of acepromazine-induced hemodynamic alterations by norepinephrine in standing horses
pequito, Manuel; Amory, Hélène ULg; Peters, Fabrice et al

Poster (2011, March 18)

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic ... [more ▼]

Acepromazine (ACP) is a phenothiazine commonly used to sedate horses. Additionally, ACP exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects, which might have a therapeutic potential in horses suffering from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). However, the ACP-induced vasodilation precludes its use in horses with SIRS-related cardiovascular compromise. The objective of this study was to test if the hemodynamic effects of the administration of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP could be counteracted by an intravenous infusion of norepinephrine (NOR) at 1ug/kg/min in healthy horses. In 5 healthy adult horses, a 15 minutes NOR IV infusion was administered 45 minutes after an injection of 0,1 mg/kg of ACP IV. The systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) was non-invasively measured by Doppler sphingometry at the tail. Hemodynamics of the median artery of the left forelimb were studied using Doppler ultrasonography, through calculation of the vessel’s surface (SURF), diameter (DIAM), circumference (CIRC), and peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV), mean velocity (MV), volumetric flow (VF) and resistivity index (RI) of the flow. Both SAP and Doppler parameters were determined at regular intervals during the entire study. ACP induced a hypotension and a vasodilatation, that were evidenced by a significant rise of the SURF, DIAM, CIRC, PSV, EDV, MV and VF and reduction of the SAP and RI. During NOR infusion, all these ACP-induced hemodynamic changes were reversed. These findings suggest that a continuous IV NOR infusion at 1ug/kg/min is able to revert ACP-induced hypotension and vasodilation in healthy adult horses. [less ▲]

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See detailMettalic foreign body in a horse: case report
Evrard, Laurence ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Gougnard, Alexandra ULg et al

Poster (2011, January 22)

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See detailUltrasonographic findings in horses with foot pain but without radiographically detectable osseous abnormalities
Rabba, Silvia ULg; Bolen, Géraldine ULg; Verwilghen, Denis ULg et al

in Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound (2011), 52(1), 95-102

Foot pain is an important cause of lameness in horses. When horses with foot pain have no detectable radiographic abnormalities, soft-tissue assessment remains a diagnostic challenge without magnetic ... [more ▼]

Foot pain is an important cause of lameness in horses. When horses with foot pain have no detectable radiographic abnormalities, soft-tissue assessment remains a diagnostic challenge without magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Ultrasonography can provide an alternative to MR imaging when that modality is not available but the extent of changes that might be seen has not been characterized. We reviewed the ultrasonographic findings in 39 horses with lameness responding positively to anesthesia of the palmar digital nerves and without radiographically detectable osseous abnormalities. Thirty of the 39 horses had lesions affecting the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT), 27 had abnormalities in the distal interphalangeal joint of which six had a visible abnormality in the collateral ligament. Ultrasonographic abnormalities were seen in the podotrochlear bursa in 22 horses and in the ligaments of the navicular bone in two horses. Abnormalities of the navicular bone flexor surface were detected in eight horses. In three of the 39 horses, only the DDFT was affected. The other 36 horses had ultrasonographic abnormalities in more than one anatomical structure. Based on our results, ultrasonographic examination provides useful diagnostic information in horses without radiographic changes. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of a protocol for fast localised abdominal sonography in horses (FLASH) admitted for colic.
Busoni, Valeria ULg; De Busscher, Virginie; Lopez, Diego et al

in Veterinary Journal (2011)

The aim of this prospective study was to establish a protocol for fast localised abdominal sonography of horses (FLASH) admitted for colic. The FLASH protocol was then presented to clinicians without ... [more ▼]

The aim of this prospective study was to establish a protocol for fast localised abdominal sonography of horses (FLASH) admitted for colic. The FLASH protocol was then presented to clinicians without extensive ultrasound (US) experience to determine whether they could learn to use it in less than 15 min. The clinical subjects comprised 36 horses that had been referred for colic over a 2 month period. Each horse was examined at admission and FLASH findings at seven topographical locations were compared to serial clinical examinations, surgical and non-surgical outcomes, or with post-mortem reports. FLASH was able to show free abdominal fluid and abnormal intestinal loops, with a mean time of 10.7 min required to complete the protocol. The positive and negative predictive values of requirement for surgery of dilated turgid small intestinal loops using FLASH were 88.89% and 81.48%, respectively. The results suggested that FLASH is a technique that can be used in an emergency setting by veterinarians without extensive US experience to detect major intra-abdominal abnormalities in horses with colic. [less ▲]

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See detailULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE CISTERNA CHYLI IN THE DOG
Etienne, Anne-Laure ULg; Cavrenne, Romain ULg; Garcia et al

Poster (2011)

Introduction/Aims The cisterna chyli (CC) is a dilated and bipartite portion of the lymphatic channels coursing intimately along the abdominal aorta in the retroperitoneal space.1 The appearance of the CC ... [more ▼]

Introduction/Aims The cisterna chyli (CC) is a dilated and bipartite portion of the lymphatic channels coursing intimately along the abdominal aorta in the retroperitoneal space.1 The appearance of the CC of the dog has been described on magnetic resonance imaging.2 The aim of this poster is to describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the CC in 2 dogs with chylous ascitis and in 2 healthy dogs. Methods Abdominal ultrasonography was realised with a 7.5MHz microconvex transducer. A right or left lateral dorsal approach was used. The aorta (together with the cranial mesenteric artery in normal dogs) was used as the main landmark to localize the CC. The dogs with chylous ascites were a 4 year old female american cocker spaniel, with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia and a 1 year old, spayed female whippet with recurrent pancreatitis. The 2 healthy dogs were a 7 year old Beagle and a 9 year old Jack Russell. The abdominal ultrasonography was realised within 2 hours after the meal in the healthy dogs. Results The CC was seen as a hypoechoic structure, without detectable flow, dorsal and to the right of the aorta. The CC was easily visible in the 2 dogs with chyloabdomen while it was more difficult to localize in the healthy dogs. The CC was tubular on the longitudinal images. On transverse images, the CC is elliptic or semilunar and may partially surround the aorta. The maximal width of the CC measured on transverse images varied from 2-3mm in the 2 healthy dogs to 4-8mm in the 2 dogs with chyloabdomen. In 3 patients some efferent/afferent lymphatic vessels were seen as thin hypoechoic tubes converging on the CC. Shape and size of the CC in the same animal were seen varying during the same ultrasonography or between different exams. Discussion/Conclusion The CC is visible by ultrasonography in dogs. Its visibility depends on different conditions like disease of the lymphatic system3, quality and distance of the meal. [less ▲]

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