References of "Burkitt, Katharine"
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See detailLiterary Form as Postcolonial Critique: Epic for the Contemporary World
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

Book published by Ashgate (2012)

Focusing on works by Derek Walcott, Les Murray, Anne Carson, and Bernardine Evaristo, Katharine Burkitt investigates the relationship between literary form and textual politics in postcolonial narrative ... [more ▼]

Focusing on works by Derek Walcott, Les Murray, Anne Carson, and Bernardine Evaristo, Katharine Burkitt investigates the relationship between literary form and textual politics in postcolonial narrative poems and verse novels. Burkitt argues that these works disrupt and undermine the traditions of particular forms and genres, and most notably the expectations attached to the prose novel, poetry, and epic. This subversion of form, Burkitt argues, is an important aspect of the texts' postcoloniality as they locate themselves critically in relation to literary convention, and they are all concerned with matters of social, racial, and national identities in a world where these categories are inherently complicated. In addition, the awareness of epic tradition in these texts unites them as “post-epics”, in that as they reuse the myths and motifs of a variety of epics, they question the status of the form, demonstrate it to be inherently malleable, and regenerate its stories for the contemporary world. As she examines the ways in which postcolonial texts rewrite the traditions of classical epics for the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Burkitt ties close textual analysis to a critical intervention in the politics of form. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (4 ULg)
See detailFrozen Moments: The Motif of the Photograph in the work of Anne Carson and Michael Ondaatje
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

in Gidley, Mick (Ed.) Writing with Light: Words and Photographs in American Texts (2010)

Anne Carson’s verse-novel Autobiography of Red locates itself on the ambivalent margins of myth and memory, interpretation and representation. As a text that is already fraught with its own generic ... [more ▼]

Anne Carson’s verse-novel Autobiography of Red locates itself on the ambivalent margins of myth and memory, interpretation and representation. As a text that is already fraught with its own generic ambiguity it draws attention to different modes of representation through its engagement with literature and photography. Carson presents her protagonist’s photographs through lyrical interludes which evoke visual representation but remain fixed within the poetic context. Through these photographs Geryon narrates his own monstrosity. He is both a homosexual young man and the monster from the myth of Herakles and the text’s preoccupation with his abject difference demonstrates a postcolonial standpoint which is based on an exploration of physical ‘otherness’. Each photograph becomes a space to explore the way in which physical presence is represented visually as well as through language. Thus, the text juxtaposes poetry and photography to explore the politics and traditions of artistic genres; furthermore Autobiography of Red demonstrates the friction that is produced when the static form of the photograph is offset with a bildungsroman narrative. Therefore, in Carson’s text a photograph is not just ‘a bunch of light hitting a plate,’ as the verse-novel itself and the title of this paper, suggests. Such a notion implies immediacy and stasis, whereas in Autobiography of Red the disparate formation of multiple photographic interludes evinces narrative progression, albeit in an unconventional mode. In order to consider Carson’s paradoxical narrative form, I will take into account theoretical engagements with literature and photography, including Roland Barthes’ Camera Lucida. Therefore this paper will draw attention to the way in which the poet harnesses the incongruous poetic form of the verse-novel, coupled with evocations of photographs, to narrate the postcolonial history of her monstrous protagonist. I will also explore the way in which Autobiography of Red uses its self-conscious textuality in order to explore the unreliable nature of memory and narrative in the construction of identity and argue that it is through these engagements with genre and form, as well as allusions to myths, literature, and photography, that Carson demonstrates the unsteady bases that form personal and social identities in the contemporary world. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (13 ULg)
See detailIn their Fathers’ Footsteps: Performing Masculinity and Fatherhood in the work of Les Murray and Michael Ondaatje
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

in Emig, Rainer; Rowland, Antony (Eds.) Performing Masculinity (2010)

At the turn of the twentieth-century the portrayal of masculinity in a postcolonial context has become increasingly complex. As the remnants of empires, those most masculine of Victorian pursuits, lie ... [more ▼]

At the turn of the twentieth-century the portrayal of masculinity in a postcolonial context has become increasingly complex. As the remnants of empires, those most masculine of Victorian pursuits, lie decrepit, so the assurances of the old relationships are dispelled and complicated by new forms of globalisation and neo-colonisation. In this context, postcolonial masculinity, a term which is itself fraught with contention, has been figured in various ways: Saladin Chamcha, the cloven-hoofed monstrous colonial of Salman Rushdie’s The Satanic Verses, the male-dominated violence of gang-land Rio de Janeiro in Fernando Meirelles’ film City of God, the aged and sexually inert immigrant male in the later works of Hanif Kureshi, and the problematic return to an authentically historicised and indigenous male identity that Derek Walcott explores in Omeros. These examples, and many others, consider the difficulty involved in articulating a coherent and positive masculine identity in a world that is fractured and characterised by disparate social contexts that are related to colonialism. I will consider this difficulty in the work of Les Murray, an Australian poet whose exploration of masculine identity is inherently linked to his conceptualisation of national identity and Australia’s fractious racial politics. In Murray’s work postcolonial masculinity is a myth of empire-building hubris, or curtailed, victimised and essentially feminised. This is in contrast to the work of others, including the Sri Lankan/Canadian writer Michael Ondaatje, for whom some versions of postcolonial masculinity offer a potent spirituality which prevails optimistically against the bleakness of a fragmentary and brutal world. In my discussion of these writers, I will consider the implications of their representation of masculinity in a postcolonial context, and draw attention to the way in which the writers’ constructions of postcolonial masculinities which cross the borders of time, nation, gender and sexuality are deployed to represent the singularity of their own postcolonial experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (12 ULg)
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See detailBreaking the Mould: Escaping the term “Black British Poetry” in the work of Jackie Kay and Bernardine Evaristo
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

in Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses (2010), 60

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (6 ULg)
See detailEpic Proportions: Post-Epic Verse-Novels and Postcolonial Critique
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

Doctoral thesis (2007)

My thesis is based on the premise that verse-novels occupy a marginalised and contested position in contemporary literature: as they tread the generic boundaries of poetry and prose writing, they are ... [more ▼]

My thesis is based on the premise that verse-novels occupy a marginalised and contested position in contemporary literature: as they tread the generic boundaries of poetry and prose writing, they are always marked by their incongruous nature. This makes for uncomfortable reading as expectations are disrupted and undermined, and, for the poet, the adoption of the verse-novel form becomes both a risky and consciously political move. Each of the verse-novels that I consider is self-conscious of its anomalous generic affiliations and utilises them in order to replicate the postcolonial politics of the text. These texts all engage with the verse-novel form in different ways and draw attention to its problematic and marginal nature. This is used to highlight their postcolonial nature, as they are all concerned with matters of racial and national identity in a world where these categories are complicated. The commonality in these works is their relationships with epic form, in this thesis I identify this as a post-epic mode of writing. My study is based on the relationship between poetic form and postcolonial critique; it focuses upon three texts: the Australian poet Les Murray’s Fredy Neptune, the Canadian poet Anne Carson’s Autobiography of Red, and British writer Bernardine Evaristo’s The Emperor’s Babe. These texts and their authors call for a reconsideration of postcolonialism; this is both demonstrative of a conceptual shift towards global notions of identity, whilst also being problematic in terms of the political commitment of the texts. Each of these works demonstrates an awareness of the contradictory nature of their positions as they shy away from utopian visions. In line with this, my aim is to demonstrate the way in which the self-reflexive employment of experimental poetry compliments an engagement with the transformative aspect of contemporary postcolonial politics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (4 ULg)
See detailImperial Reflections: The Post-Colonial Verse-Novel as Post-Epic
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

in Hardwick, Lorna (Ed.) Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 ULg)
See detailThe Future of Identity
Burkitt, Katharine ULg

Book published by University of Sallford (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULg)