References of "Bruyère, Olivier"
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See detailEffects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study
Mouton, Alexandre ULg; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore et al

Conference (2017, July 08)

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4 meters by 3 meters) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and on a broader array of physical and psychological ... [more ▼]

Purpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4 meters by 3 meters) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and on a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5 ± 6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part to the one-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas eleven participants (aged 89.9 ± 3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach, based on the self-determination theory (SDT). The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of three months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph, GT3X+), cognitive status (MMSE), quality of life (EQ-5D), motivation for PA (BREQ-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and SPPB), functional mobility (Timed Up and Go) and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. Results and conclusions: In the intervention group, PA increased from 2921 steps/day at baseline to 3358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, p = 0.04) and 4083 steps/day (+39.8%, p = 0.03) after three months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, p = 0.01) and after three months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, p = 0.02). Quality of life (p < 0.05), balance and gait (p < 0.05), and strength of the ankle (p < 0.05) were also improved after three months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the longterm effectiveness of PA interventions in nursing homes [less ▲]

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See detailThe internet as a source of information used by women after childbirth to meet their need for information: A web-based survey.
Slomian, Justine ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Midwifery (2017), 48

OBJECTIVE: the aims of this survey were: (a) to evaluate the need of information after childbirth and what questions do 'new' mothers ask themselves; (b) to assess why and how women use the Internet to ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: the aims of this survey were: (a) to evaluate the need of information after childbirth and what questions do 'new' mothers ask themselves; (b) to assess why and how women use the Internet to meet their need of information; (c) to describe how the respondents evaluate the reliability of the information found; (d) to understand how the information found on the Internet affects women's decision-making; and (e) to appreciate how health professionals react to the information found by the women. DESIGN: this study used a large web-based survey that was widely broadcasted on various websites and social networks. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: belgian women who had a child under 2 years old and who agreed to participate were included in the study. FINDINGS: 349 questionnaires were valid for analyses. After childbirth, 90.5% of women admitted to using the Internet to seek information about themselves or about their baby, regardless of socioeconomic status or age. There were various reasons for seeking information on the Internet, but the most frequent reason the women expressed was to find information 'on their own' (88.1%). The most searched for topic was breastfeeding. The women believed that the information was quite useful (82.7%) but they assigned an average score of 5.3 out of 10 for the quality of the information they found on the Internet. Approximately 80% of the women felt that the Internet helped them control a decision that they made 'a little', 'often' or 'very often'. Professionals are not always willing to talk about information found on the Internet with mothers. Therefore, many women believed that health professionals should suggest reliable Internet websites for new mothers. CONCLUSIONS: the integration of the Internet and new technologies could be a useful tool during postpartum management. [less ▲]

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See detailTraduction en français du "back pain attitudes questionnaire" et étude de ses qualités métrologiques
Demoulin, Christophe ULg; hALLEUX, V.; DARLOW, B. et al

in Kinesitherapie Revue (2017, April), 184

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See detailVitamin D supplementation in the prevention and management of major chronic diseases not related to mineral homeostasis in adults: research for evidence and a scientific statement from the European society for clinical and economic aspects of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Cianferotti, Luisella; Bertoldo, Francesco; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike et al

in Endocrine (2017), 56(2), 245-61

Introduction Optimal vitamin D status promotes skeletal health and is recommended with specific treatment in individuals at high risk for fragility fractures. A growing body of literature has provided ... [more ▼]

Introduction Optimal vitamin D status promotes skeletal health and is recommended with specific treatment in individuals at high risk for fragility fractures. A growing body of literature has provided indirect and some direct evidence for possible extraskeletal vitamin D-related effects. Purpose and Methods Members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis have reviewed the main evidence for possible proven benefits of vitamin D supplementation in adults at risk of or with overt chronic extra-skeletal diseases, providing recommendations and guidelines for future studies in this field. Results and conclusions Robust mechanistic evidence is available from in vitro studies and in vivo animal studies, usually employing cholecalciferol, calcidiol or calcitriol in pharmacologic rather than physiologic doses. Although many cross-sectional and prospective association studies in humans have shown that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (i.e., <50 nmol/L) are consistently associated with chronic diseases, further strengthened by a dose-response relationship, several meta-analyses of clinical trials have shown contradictory results. Overall, large randomized controlled trials with sufficient doses of vitamin D are missing, and available small to moderate-size trials often included people with baseline levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L, did not simultaneously assess multiple outcomes, and did not report overall safety (e.g., falls). Thus, no recommendations can be made to date for the use of vitamin D supplementation in general, parental compounds, or non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analogs in the prevention and treatment of extra-skeletal chronic diseases. Moreover, attainment of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels well above the threshold desired for bone health cannot be recommended based on current evidence, since safety has yet to be confirmed. Finally, the promising findings from mechanistic studies, large cohort studies, and small clinical trials obtained for autoimmune diseases (including type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus), cardiovascular disorders, and overall reduction in mortality require further confirmation. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidisciplinary rehabilitation program after breast cancer: benefits on physical function, anthropometry and quality of life.
Leclerc, Anne-France ULg; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULg; Tomasella, Marco ULg et al

in European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (2017)

BACKGROUND: Different clinical trials show beneficial effects of physical training offered during and / or after breast cancer treatment. However, given the variety of side effects that may be encountered ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Different clinical trials show beneficial effects of physical training offered during and / or after breast cancer treatment. However, given the variety of side effects that may be encountered, physical training could be combined with psychological, relational and social guidance. This kind of multidisciplinary program has been little studied so far. AIM: To determine the benefits of a three-month multidisciplinary rehabilitation program among women after breast cancer treatment. DESIGN: Controlled no-randomized trial. SETTING: University for outcomes, University Hospital Center for interventions. POPULATION: Two hundred and nine outpatients who have been treated for a primary breast carcinoma. METHODS: Patients were divided into a control group (n=106) and an experimental group (n=103) which has benefited from a rehabilitation program of three months including physical training and psycho-educational sessions. The assessments, performed before and after the program, included functional assessments ("Sit and Reach Test", maximal incremental exercise test and "Six-Minute Walk Test"), body composition measurements (body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage) and a questionnaire (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30). RESULTS: After three months, flexibility, walking distance and all parameters measured during the maximal incremental exercise, except maximal heart rate, were significantly improved in the experimental group. The body fat percentage was significantly decreased and a significant improvement was observed for perceived health status (quality of life), functional role, emotional state, physical, cognitive and social functions and for most symptoms. In the control group, most of these improvements didn't appear and a significant increase in BMI and body fat percentage was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This trial identifies the benefits of a well detailed multidisciplinary rehabilitation program, including physical re-conditioning and psycho-educational sessions, with important improvements in functional capacity, body composition and the majority of functions and symptoms among women after breast cancer treatment. CLINICAL REHABILITATION IMPACT: Through its results, this study could contribute to the development of hospital quality standards for oncologic rehabilitation. Physiotherapists can efficiently propose this kind of multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of sarcopenia accoring to 10 different operational definitions of the frailty.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailProfile of osteoarthritic patients undergoing total hip and knee arthroplasty.
Neuprez, Audrey ULg; KURTH, William ULg; GILLET, Philippe ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailThe SarcoPhAge study: evolution of sarcopenic subjects after 2 years of follow-up.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Locquet, Médéa ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailSubjective sleep quality in sarcopenic vs non-sarcopenic older adults from the sarcophage cohort.
Locquet, Médéa ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Delandsheere, Laura ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailSarcopenia in nursing home residents: the senior cohort.
Buckinx, Fanny ULg; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailNutrition and physical activity in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia: systematic review.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Dawson, A.; Shaw, S. C. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2017), 28(6), 1817-33

This systematic review summarizes the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention on muscle mass and muscle function. A total of 37 RCTs were identified. Results indicate that physical exercise ... [more ▼]

This systematic review summarizes the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention on muscle mass and muscle function. A total of 37 RCTs were identified. Results indicate that physical exercise has a positive impact on muscle mass and muscle function in subjects aged 65 years and older. However, any interactive effect of dietary supplementation appears to be limited. INTRODUCTION: In 2013, Denison et al. conducted a systematic review including 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to explore the effect of combined exercise and nutrition intervention to improve muscle mass, muscle strength, or physical performance in older people. They concluded that further studies were needed to provide evidence upon which public health and clinical recommendations could be based. The purpose of the present work was to update the prior systematic review and include studies published up to October 2015. METHODS: Using the electronic databases MEDLINE and EMBASE, we identified RCTs which assessed the combined effect of exercise training and nutritional supplementation on muscle strength, muscle mass, or physical performance in subjects aged 60 years and over. Study selection and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: The search strategy identified 21 additional RCTs giving a total of 37 RCTs. Studies were heterogeneous in terms of protocols for physical exercise and dietary supplementation (proteins, essential amino acids, creatine, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbuthyrate, vitamin D, multi-nutrients, or other). In 79% of the studies (27/34 RCTs), muscle mass increased with exercise but an additional effect of nutrition was only found in 8 RCTs (23.5%). Muscle strength increased in 82.8% of the studies (29/35 RCTs) following exercise intervention, and dietary supplementation showed additional benefits in only a small number of studies (8/35 RCTS, 22.8%). Finally, the majority of studies showed an increase of physical performance following exercise intervention (26/28 RCTs, 92.8%) but interaction with nutrition supplementation was only found in 14.3% of these studies (4/28 RCTs). CONCLUSION: Physical exercise has a positive impact on muscle mass and muscle function in healthy subjects aged 60 years and older. The biggest effect of exercise intervention, of any type, has been seen on physical performance (gait speed, chair rising test, balance, SPPB test, etc.). We observed huge variations in regard to the dietary supplementation protocols. Based on the included studies, mainly performed on well-nourished subjects, the interactive effect of dietary supplementation on muscle function appears limited. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferentiation of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate from other glucosamine preparations will optimize osteoarthritis treatment.
Saengnipanthkul, Sukit; Waikakul, Saranatra; Rojanasthien, Sattaya et al

in International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases (2017)

Symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) are recommended for the medium- to long-term management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) due to their abilities to control pain, improve function and ... [more ▼]

Symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) are recommended for the medium- to long-term management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) due to their abilities to control pain, improve function and delay joint structural changes. Among SYSADOAs, evidence is greatest for the patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate (pCGS) formulation (Mylan). Glucosamine is widely available as glucosamine sulfate (GS) and glucosamine hydrochloride (GH) preparations that vary substantially in molecular form, pharmaceutical formulation and dose regimen. Only pCGS is given as a highly bioavailable once-daily dose (1500 mg), which consistently delivers the plasma levels of around 10 mumol/L required to inhibit interleukin-1-induced expression of genes involved in the pathophysiology of joint inflammation and tissue destruction. Careful consideration of the evidence base reveals that only pCGS reliably provides a moderate effect size on pain that is higher than paracetamol and equivalent to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), while non-crystalline GS and GH fail to reach statistical significance for pain reduction. Chronic administration of pCGS has disease-modifying effects, with a reduction in need for total joint replacement lasting for 5 years after treatment cessation. Pharmacoeconomic studies of pCGS demonstrate long-term reduction in additional pain analgesia and NSAIDs, with a 50% reduction in costs of other OA medication and healthcare consultations. Consequently, pCGS is the logical choice, with demonstrated medium-term control of pain and lasting impact on disease progression. Physician and patient education on the differentiation of pCGS from other glucosamine formulations will help to improve treatment selection, increase treatment adherence, and optimize clinical benefit in OA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Future Prevalence of Sarcopenia in Europe: A Claim for Public Health Action.
Ethgen, Olivier ULg; Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Buckinx, Fanny ULg et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2017), 100(3), 229-234

Sarcopenia is a major public health issue. To convince health policy makers of the emergency to invest in the sarcopenia field, it is of critical importance to produce reliable figures of the expected ... [more ▼]

Sarcopenia is a major public health issue. To convince health policy makers of the emergency to invest in the sarcopenia field, it is of critical importance to produce reliable figures of the expected burden of sarcopenia in the coming years. Age- and gender-specific population projections were retrieved until 2045 from the Eurostat online database (28 European countries). Age- and gender-specific prevalences of sarcopenia were interpolated from a study that compared prevalence estimates according to the different diagnostic cutoffs of the EWGSOP proposed definition. The reported prevalence estimates were interpolated between 65 and 100 years. Interpolated age- and gender-specific estimates of sarcopenia prevalence were then applied to population projections until 2045. Using the definition providing the lowest prevalence estimates, the number of individuals with sarcopenia would rise in Europe from 10,869,527 in 2016 to 18,735,173 in 2045 (a 72.4% increase). This corresponds to an overall prevalence of sarcopenia in the elderly rising from 11.1% in 2016 to 12.9% in 2045. With the definition providing the highest prevalence estimates, the number of individuals with sarcopenia would rise from 19,740,527 in 2016 to 32,338,990 in 2045 (a 63.8% increase), corresponding to overall prevalence rates in the elderly of 20.2% and 22.3% for 2016 and 2045, respectively. We showed that the number of sarcopenic patients will dramatically increase in the next 30 years, making consequences of muscle wasting a major public health issue. [less ▲]

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See detailEnglish translation and validation of the SarQoL®, a quality of life questionnaire specific for sarcopenia
Beaudart, Charlotte ULg; Edwards, Mark; Moss, Charlotte et al

in Age & Ageing (2017), 46(2), 271-7

Background: the first quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia, the SarQoL®, has recently been developed and validated in French. To extend the availability and utilisation of this ... [more ▼]

Background: the first quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia, the SarQoL®, has recently been developed and validated in French. To extend the availability and utilisation of this questionnaire, its translation and validation in other languages is necessary. Objective: the purpose of this study was therefore to translate the SarQoL® into English and validate the psychometric properties of this new version. Design: cross-sectional. Setting: Hertfordshire, UK. Subjects: in total, 404 participants of the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, UK. Methods: the translation part was articulated in five stages: (i) two initial translations from French to English; (ii) synthesis of the two translations; (iii) backward translations; (iv) expert committee to compare the backward translations with the original questionnaire and (v) pre-test. To validate the English SarQoL®, we assessed its validity (discriminative power, construct validity), reliability (internal consistency, test–retest reliability) and floor/ceiling effects. Results: the SarQoL® questionnaire was translated without any major difficulties. Results indicated a good discriminative power (lower score of quality of life for sarcopenic subjects, P = 0.01), high internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha of 0.88), consistent construct validity (high correlations found with domains related to mobility, usual activities, vitality, physical function and low correlations with domains related to anxiety, self-care, mental health and social problems) and excellent test–retest reliability (intraclass coefficient correlation of 0.95, 95%CI 0.92–0.97). Moreover, no floor/ceiling has been found. Conclusions: a valid SarQoL® English questionnaire is now available and can be used with confidence to better assess the disease burden associated with sarcopenia. It could also be used as a treatment outcome indicator in research. [less ▲]

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See detailAdverse Health Events Related to Self-Medication Practices Among Elderly: A Systematic Review.
Locquet, Médéa ULg; Honvo, Germain ULg; Rabenda, Véronique ULg et al

in Drugs & Aging (2017)

BACKGROUND: Older adults often resort to self-medication to relieve symptoms of their current illnesses; however, the risks of this practice are multiplied in old age. In particular, this age group is ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Older adults often resort to self-medication to relieve symptoms of their current illnesses; however, the risks of this practice are multiplied in old age. In particular, this age group is more vulnerable to adverse drug events because of the physiological changes that occur due to senescence. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to obtain an overview of the adverse health events related to self-medication among subjects aged 60 years and over through a systematic review of the literature. METHODS: A study of relevant articles was conducted among databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EBM Reviews-Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews). Eligibility criteria were established and applied by two investigators to include suitable studies. The results and outcomes of interest were detailed in a descriptive report. RESULTS: The electronic search identified 4096 references, and the full texts of 74 were reviewed, of which four were retained in the analysis: three had a cross-sectional design and one prospectively followed elderly subjects. The first study showed a 26.7% prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among elders, the second study found a 75% prevalence of side effects, and, finally, a prospective study showed an ADR incidence of 4.5% among self-medicated elders. These studies showed that adverse health events related to self-medication are relatively frequently reported. They also highlighted that analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs are the most self-medicated products, while vitamins and dietary supplements also appear to be frequently self-administered, but by older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Studies on self-medication in the elderly and its adverse health effects are clearly lacking. There is a need to perform prospective studies on this topic to gain a clear understanding of the extent of this problem and to enhance the awareness of health professionals to better inform seniors. [less ▲]

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