References of "Bruntt, H"
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See detailDifferential Seismic Modeling of Stars
Ozel, N.; Mosser, B.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (2013, December 01)

CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary Transits) observations provide the opportunity to study a large sample of stars ranging from the Main Sequence (MS) to the Red Giant Branch. With the large ... [more ▼]

CoRoT (Convection Rotation and planetary Transits) observations provide the opportunity to study a large sample of stars ranging from the Main Sequence (MS) to the Red Giant Branch. With the large increase in the number of stars showing solar-like oscillations, we intend to extract as much information as possible from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) oscillation spectrum, benefiting from comparison with a reference star having similar seismic and fundamental parameters. We propose a differential method to determine stellar properties of solar-like oscillations which we call “differential seismology of stellar twins”. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferential asteroseismic study of seismic twins observed by CoRoT. Comparison of HD 175272 with HD 181420
Ozel, N.; Mosser, B.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 558

Context. The CoRoT short asteroseismic runs give us the opportunity to observe a large variety of late-type stars through their solar-like oscillations. We report the observation and modeling of the F5V ... [more ▼]

Context. The CoRoT short asteroseismic runs give us the opportunity to observe a large variety of late-type stars through their solar-like oscillations. We report the observation and modeling of the F5V star HD 175272. <BR /> Aims: Our aim is to define a method for extracting as much information as possible from a noisy oscillation spectrum. <BR /> Methods: We followed a differential approach that consists of using a well-known star as a reference to characterize another star. We used classical tools such as the envelope autocorrelation function to derive the global seismic parameters of the star. We compared HD 175272 with HD 181420 through a linear approach, because they appear to be asteroseismic twins. <BR /> Results: The comparison with the reference star enables us to substantially enhance the scientific output for HD 175272. First, we determined its global characteristics through a detailed seismic analysis of HD 181420. Second, with our differential approach, we measured the difference of mass, radius and age between HD 175272 and HD 181420. <BR /> Conclusions: We have developed a general method able to derive asteroseismic constraints on a star even in case of low-quality data. This method can be applied to stars with interesting properties but low signal-to-noise ratio oscillation spectrum, such as stars hosting an exoplanet or members of a binary system. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 2006 December 27, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Programs of ESA, ESAs RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XXI. CoRoT-19b: A low density planet orbiting an old inactive F9V-star
Guenther, E. W.; Diaz, R. F.; Gazzano, J-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 537

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to ... [more ▼]

Observations of transiting extrasolar planets are of key importance to our understanding of planets because their mass, radius, and mass density can be determined. The CoRoT space mission allows us to achieve a very high photometric accuracy. By combining CoRoT data with high-precision radial velocity measurements, we derive precise planetary radii and masses. We report the discovery of CoRoT-19b, a gas-giant planet transiting an old, inactive F9V-type star with a period of four days. After excluding alternative physical configurations mimicking a planetary transit signal, we determine the radius and mass of the planet by combining CoRoT photometry with high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the echelle spectrographs SOPHIE, HARPS, FIES, and SANDIFORD. To improve the precision of its ephemeris and the epoch, we observed additional transits with the TRAPPIST and Euler telescopes. Using HARPS spectra obtained during the transit, we then determine the projected angle between the spin of the star and the orbit of the planet. We find that the host star of CoRoT-19b is an inactive F9V-type star close to the end of its main-sequence life. The host star has a mass M*=1.21+/-0.05 Msun and radius R*=1.65+/-0.04 Rsun. The planet has a mass of Mp=1.11+/-0.06 Mjup and radius of Rp=1.29+/-0.03 Rjup. The resulting bulk density is only rho=0.71+/-0.06 gcm-3, which is much lower than that for Jupiter. The exoplanet CoRoT-19b is an example of a giant planet of almost the same mass as Jupiter but a 30% larger radius. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT LRa01 field
Carone, L.; Gandolfi, D.; Cabrera, J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose ... [more ▼]

Context: CoRoT is a pioneering space mission whose primary goals are stellar seismology and extrasolar planets search. Its surveys of large stellar fields generate numerous planetary candidates whose lightcurves have transit-like features. An extensive analytical and observational follow-up effort is undertaken to classify these candidates. Aims: The list of planetary transit candidates from the CoRoT LRa01 star field in the Monoceros constellation towards the Galactic anti-center is presented. The CoRoT observations of LRa01 lasted from 24 October 2007 to 3 March 2008. Methods: 7470 chromatic and 3938 monochromatic lightcurves were acquired and analysed. Instrumental noise and stellar variability were treated with several filtering tools by different teams from the CoRoT community. Different transit search algorithms were applied to the lightcurves. Results: Fifty-one stars were classified as planetary transit candidates in LRa01. Thirty-seven (i.e., 73 % of all candidates) are "good" planetary candidates based on photometric analysis only. Thirty-two (i.e., 87 % of the "good" candidates) have been followed-up. At the time of this writing twenty-two cases have been solved and five planets have been discovered: three transiting hot-Jupiters (CoRoT-5b, CoRoT-12b, and CoRoT-21b), the first terrestrial transiting planet (CoRoT-7b), and another planet in the same system (CoRoT-7c, detected by radial velocity survey only). Evidences of another non-transiting planet in the CoRoT-7 system, namely CoRoT-7d, have been recently found. [less ▲]

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See detailXX. CoRoT-20b: A very high density, high eccentricity transiting giant planet
Deleuil, M.; Bonomo, A. S.; Ferraz-Mello, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT space mission of a new giant planet, CoRoT-20b. The planet has a mass of 4.24 +/- 0.23 MJ and a radius of 0.84 +/- 0.04 RJ. With a mean density of 8.87 +/- 1.10 g/cm^3, it is among the most compact planets known so far. Evolution models for the planet suggest a mass of heavy elements of the order of 800 ME if embedded in a central core, requiring a revision either of the planet formation models or of planet evolution and structure models. We note however that smaller amounts of heavy elements are expected from more realistic models in which they are mixed throughout the envelope. The planet orbits a G-type star with an orbital period of 9.24 days and an eccentricity of 0.56. The star's projected rotational velocity is vsini = 4.5 +/- 1.0 km/s, corresponding to a spin period of 11.5 +/- 3.1 days if its axis of rotation is perpendicular to the orbital plane. In the framework of Darwinian theories and neglecting stellar magnetic breaking, we calculate the tidal evolution of the system and show that CoRoT-20b is presently one of the very few Darwin-stable planets that is evolving towards a triple synchronous state with equality of the orbital, planetary and stellar spin periods. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XXII. CoRoT-16b: a hot Jupiter with a hint of eccentricity around a faint solar-like star
Ollivier, M; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Santerne, A et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 541

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-16b, a low density hot jupiter that orbits a faint G5V star (mV = 15.63) in 5.3523 ± 0.0002 days with slight eccentricity. A fit of the data with no a priori assumptions on the orbit leads to an eccentricity of 0.33 ± 0.1. We discuss this value and also derive the mass and radius of the planet. <BR /> Methods: We analyse the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-16 given by the CoRoT satellite, and radial velocity data from the HARPS and HIRES spectrometers. A combined analysis using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is used to get the system parameters. <BR /> Results: CoRoT-16b is a 0.535 -0.083/+0.085 M[SUB]J[/SUB], 1.17 -0.14/+0.16 R[SUB]J[/SUB] hot Jupiter with a density of 0.44 -0.14/+0.21 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Despite its short orbital distance (0.0618 ± 0.0015 AU) and the age of the parent star (6.73 ± 2.8 Gyr), the planet orbit exhibits significantly non-zero eccentricity. This is very uncommon for this type of objects as tidal effects tend to circularise the orbit. This value is discussed taking into account the characteristics of the star and the observation accuracy. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Observations made with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (HARPS programs 083.C-0186 and 184.C-0639) and the HIRES spectrograph at the Keck Observatory (NASA-Keck programs N035Hr, N143Hr and N095Hr). [less ▲]

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See detailPlanetary transit candidates in the CoRoT-SRc01 field
Erikson, A.; Santerne, A.; Renner, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 539

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates ... [more ▼]

Context. The space mission CoRoT is devoted to the analysis of stellar variability and the photometric detection of extrasolar planets. <BR /> Aims: We present the list of planetary transit candidates detected in the first short run observed by CoRoT that targeted SRc01, towards the Galactic center in the direction of Aquila, which lasted from April to May 2007. <BR /> Methods: Among the acquired data, we analyzed those for 1269 sources in the chromatic bands and 5705 in the monochromatic band. Instrumental noise and the stellar variability were treated with several detrending tools, to which several transit-search algorithms were subsequently applied. <BR /> Results: Fifty-one sources were classified as planetary transit candidates and 26 were followed up with ground-based observations. Until now, no planet has been detected in the CoRoT data from the SRc01 field. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with contributions from Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA, Germany, and Spain. The CoRoT data are available to the community from the CoRoT archive: <A href="http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr">http://idoc-corot.ias.u-psud.fr</A>Based in part on observations made with the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute Provence (CNRS), France (SOPHIE Program 08A.PNP.MOUT).Based in part on observations made with the ESO-3.60-m telescope at La Silla Observatory (ESO), Chile (HARPS Program ESO - 081.C-0388) and with the ESO-VLT telescope at Paranal Observatory (ESO), Chile (FLAMES Program ESO - 081.C-0413). [less ▲]

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See detailModelling a high-mass red giant observed by CoRoT
Baudin, F.; Barban, C.; Goupil, M. J. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 538

Context. The advent of space-borne photometers such as CoRoT and Kepler has opened up new fields in asteroseismology. This is especially true for red giants as only a few of these stars were known to ... [more ▼]

Context. The advent of space-borne photometers such as CoRoT and Kepler has opened up new fields in asteroseismology. This is especially true for red giants as only a few of these stars were known to oscillate with small amplitude, solar-like oscillations before the launch of CoRoT. <BR /> Aims: The G6 giant HR 2582 (HD 50890) was observed by CoRoT for approximately 55 days. We present here the analysis of its light curve and the characterisation of the star using different observables, such as its location in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and seismic observables. <BR /> Methods: Mode frequencies are extracted from the observed Fourier spectrum of the light curve. Numerical stellar models are then computed to determine the characteristics of the star (mass, age, etc.) from the comparison with observational constraints. <BR /> Results: We provide evidence for the presence of solar-like oscillations at low frequency, between 10 and 20 μHz, with a regular spacing of (1.7 ± 0.1) μHz between consecutive radial orders. Only radial modes are clearly visible. From the models compatible with the observational constraints used here, We find that HR 2582 (HD 50890) is a massive star with a mass in the range (3-5 M[SUB]&sun;[/SUB]), clearly above the red clump. It oscillates with rather low radial order (n = 5-12) modes. Its evolutionary stage cannot be determined with precision: the star could be on the ascending red giant branch (hydrogen shell burning) with an age of approximately 155 Myr or in a later phase (helium burning). In order to obtain a reasonable helium amount, the metallicity of the star must be quite subsolar. Our best models are obtained with a mixing length significantly smaller than that obtained for the Sun with the same physical description (except overshoot). The amount of core overshoot during the main-sequence phase is found to be mild, of the order of 0.1 H[SUB]p[/SUB]. <BR /> Conclusions: HR 2582 (HD 50890) is an interesting case as only a few massive stars can be observed due to their rapid evolution compared to less massive red giants. HR 2582 (HD 50890) is also one of the few cases that can be used to validate the scaling relations for massive red giants stars and its sensitivity to the physics of the star. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 2006 December 27, was developed and is operated by the CNES with participation of the Science Programs of ESA; ESA's RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVII. The hot Jupiter CoRoT-17b: a very old planet
Csizmadia, Szilard; Moutou, C.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 531

We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], while its ... [more ▼]

We report on the discovery of a hot Jupiter-type exoplanet, CoRoT-17b, detected by the CoRoT satellite. It has a mass of 2.43 ± 0.30 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.02 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], while its mean density is 2.82 ± 0.38 g/cm[SUP]3[/SUP]. CoRoT-17b is in a circular orbit with a period of 3.7681 ± 0.0003 days. The host star is an old (10.7 ± 1.0 Gyr) main-sequence star, which makes it an intriguing object for planetary evolution studies. The planet's internal composition is not well constrained and can range from pure H/He to one that can contain ~380 earth masses of heavier elements. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XVI. CoRoT-14b: an unusually dense very hot Jupiter
Tingley, B.; Endl, M.; Gazzano, J*-C et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 528

In this paper, the CoRoT ExoplanetScience Team announces its 14th discovery. Herein, we discuss the observations and analyses that allowed us to derive the parameters of this system: a hot Jupiter with a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, the CoRoT ExoplanetScience Team announces its 14th discovery. Herein, we discuss the observations and analyses that allowed us to derive the parameters of this system: a hot Jupiter with a mass of 7.6 ± 0.6 Jupiter masses orbiting a solar-type star (F9V) with a period of only 1.5 d, less than 5 stellar radii from its parent star. It is unusual for such a massive planet to have such a small orbit: only one other known higher mass exoplanet orbits with a shorter period. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailAsteroseismology of solar-type stars with Kepler: III. Ground-based data
Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Bruntt, H.; Sousa, S. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more ... [more ▼]

We report on the ground-based follow-up program of spectroscopic and photometric observations of solar-like asteroseismic targets for the Kepler space mission. These stars constitute a large group of more than a thousand objects which are the subject of an intensive study by the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium Working Group 1 (KASC WG-1). In the current work we will discuss the methods we use to determine the fundamental stellar atmospheric parameters using high-quality stellar spectra. These provide essential constraints for the asteroseismic modelling and make it possible to verify the parameters in the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC). [less ▲]

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See detailGround-based follow-up in relation to Kepler asteroseismic investigation
Uytterhoeven, K.; Briquet, Maryline ULg; Bruntt, H. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous and high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all ... [more ▼]

The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous and high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as T_eff, log g, metallicity, and v sin i, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope and William Herschel Telescope operated by the Isaac Newton Group, with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica), and with the Mercator telescope, operated by the Flemish Community, all on the island of La Palma at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC). Based on observations made with the IAC-80 operated on the island of Tenerife by the IAC at the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Mártir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Mt. Wilson, Białków Observatory of the Wrocław University, Piszkésteto Mountain Station, and Observatoire de Haute Provence. Based on spectra taken at the Loiano (INAF - OA Bologna), Serra La Nave (INAF - OA Catania) and Asiago (INAF - OA Padova) observatories. Also based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). We acknowledge with thanks the variable star observations from the AAVSO International Database contributed by observers worldwide and used in this research. Funding for the Kepler mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. We thank the entire Kepler team for the development and operations of this outstanding mission. [less ▲]

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See detailExoplanet discoveries with the CoRoT space observatory
Lammer, H.; Dvorak, R.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Solar System Research (2010), 44

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT space observatory is a project which is led by the French space agency CNES and leading space research institutes in Austria, Brazil, Belgium, Germany and Spain and also the European Space Agency ESA. CoRoT observed since its launch in December 27, 2006 about 100 000 stars for the exoplanet channel, during 150 days uninterrupted high-precision photometry. Since the The CoRoT-team has several exoplanet candidates which are currently analyzed under its study, we report here the discoveries of nine exoplanets which were observed by CoRoT. Discovered exoplanets such as CoRoT-3b populate the brown dwarf desert and close the gap of measured physical properties between usual gas giants and very low mass stars. CoRoT discoveries extended the known range of planet masses down to about 4.8 Earth-masses (CoRoT-7b) and up to 21 Jupiter masses (CoRoT-3b), the radii to about 1.68 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] (CoRoT-7b) and up to the most inflated hot Jupiter with 1.49 × 0.09 R [SUB]Earth[/SUB] found so far (CoRoT-1b), and the transiting exoplanet with the longest period of 95.274 days (CoRoT-9b). Giant exoplanets have been detected at low metallicity, rapidly rotating and active, spotted stars. Two CoRoT planets have host stars with the lowest content of heavy elements known to show a transit hinting towards a different planethost-star-metallicity relation then the one found by radial-velocity search programs. Finally the properties of the CoRoT-7b prove that rocky planets with a density close to Earth exist outside the Solar System. Finally the detection of the secondary transit of CoRoT-1b at a sensitivity level of 10[SUP]-5[/SUP] and the very clear detection of the "super-Earth" CoRoT-7b at 3.5 × 10[SUP]-4[/SUP] relative flux are promising evidence that the space observatory is being able to detect even smaller exoplanets with the size of the Earth. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission . XIII. CoRoT-13b: a dense hot Jupiter in transit around a star with solar metallicity and super-solar lithium content
Cabrera, J.; Bruntt, H.; Ollivier, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 522

We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and ... [more ▼]

We announce the discovery of the transiting planet CoRoT-13b. Ground-based follow-up in CFHT and IAC80 confirmed CoRoT's observations. The mass of the planet was measured with the HARPS spectrograph and the properties of the host star were obtained analyzing HIRES spectra from the Keck telescope. It is a hot Jupiter-like planet with an orbital period of 4.04 days, 1.3 Jupiter masses, 0.9 Jupiter radii, and a density of 2.34 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. It orbits a G0V star with T_eff = 5 945 K, M[SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.09 M[SUB]ȯ[/SUB], R_* = 1.01 R[SUB]ȯ[/SUB], solar metallicity, a lithium content of + 1.45 dex, and an estimated age of between 0.12 and 3.15 Gyr. The lithium abundance of the star is consistent with its effective temperature, activity level, and age range derived from the stellar analysis. The density of the planet is extreme for its mass, implies that heavy elements are present with a mass of between about 140 and 300 {M}[SUB]⊕[/SUB]. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Part of the observations were obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based on observations made with HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 184.C-0639). Based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Part of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission XIV. CoRoT-11b: a transiting massive "hot-Jupiter" in a prograde orbit around a rapidly rotating F-type star
Gandolfi, D.; Hébrard, G.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 524

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K ... [more ▼]

The CoRoT exoplanet science team announces the discovery of CoRoT-11b, a fairly massive hot-Jupiter transiting a V=12.9 mag F6 dwarf star (M*=1.27 +/- 0.05 Msun, R*=1.37 +/- 0.03 Rsun, Teff=6440 +/- 120 K), with an orbital period of P=2.994329 +/- 0.000011 days and semi-major axis a=0.0436 +/- 0.005 AU. The detection of part of the radial velocity anomaly caused by the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect shows that the transit-like events detected by CoRoT are caused by a planet-sized transiting object in a prograde orbit. The relatively high projected rotational velocity of the star (vsini=40+/-5 km/s) places CoRoT-11 among the most rapidly rotating planet host stars discovered so far. With a planetary mass of mp=2.33+/-0.34 Mjup and radius rp=1.43+/-0.03 Rjup, the resulting mean density of CoRoT-11b (rho=0.99+/-0.15 g/cm^3) can be explained with a model for an inflated hydrogen-planet with a solar composition and a high level of energy dissipation in its interior. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. X. CoRoT-10b: a giant planet in a 13.24 day eccentric orbit
Bonomo, A. S.; Santerne, A.; Alonso, R. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

Context. The space telescope CoRoT searches for transiting extrasolar planets by continuously monitoring the optical flux of thousands of stars in several fields of view. <BR /> Aims: We report the ... [more ▼]

Context. The space telescope CoRoT searches for transiting extrasolar planets by continuously monitoring the optical flux of thousands of stars in several fields of view. <BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-10b, a giant planet on a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.53 ± 0.04) revolving in 13.24 days around a faint (V = 15.22) metal-rich K1V star. <BR /> Methods: We used CoRoT photometry, radial velocity observations taken with the HARPS spectrograph, and UVES spectra of the parent star to derive the orbital, stellar, and planetary parameters. <BR /> Results: We derive a radius of the planet of 0.97 ± 0.07 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a mass of 2.75 ± 0.16 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The bulk density, ρ[SUB]p[/SUB] = 3.70 ± 0.83 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP], is ~2.8 that of Jupiter. The core of CoRoT-10b could contain up to 240 M_⊕ of heavy elements. Moving along its eccentric orbit, the planet experiences a 10.6-fold variation in insolation. Owing to the long circularisation time, τ[SUB]circ[/SUB] > 7 Gyr, a resonant perturber is not required to excite and maintain the high eccentricity of CoRoT-10b. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XI. CoRoT-8b: a hot and dense sub-Saturn around a K1 dwarf
Bordé, P.; Bouchy, F.; Deleuil, M. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We report the discovery of CoRoT-8b, a dense small Saturn-class exoplanet that orbits a K1 dwarf in 6.2 days, and we derive its orbital parameters, mass, and radius. <BR /> Methods: We analyzed two complementary data sets: the photometric transit curve of CoRoT-8b as measured by CoRoT and the radial velocity curve of CoRoT-8 as measured by the HARPS spectrometer. <BR /> Results: We find that CoRoT-8b is on a circular orbit with a semi-major axis of 0.063 ± 0.001 AU. It has a radius of 0.57 ± 0.02 R[SUB]J[/SUB], a mass of 0.22 ± 0.03 M[SUB]J[/SUB], and therefore a mean density of 1.6 ± 0.1 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]. <BR /> Conclusions: With 67% of the size of Saturn and 72% of its mass, CoRoT-8b has a density comparable to that of Neptune (1.76 g cm[SUP]-3[/SUP]). We estimate its content in heavy elements to be 47-63 {M}_⊕, and the mass of its hydrogen-helium envelope to be 7-23 {M}_⊕. At 0.063 AU, the thermal loss of hydrogen of CoRoT-8b should be no more than 0.1% over an assumed integrated lifetime of 3 Ga. Observations made with SOPHIE spectrograph at Observatoire de Haute Provence, France (PNP.07B.MOUT), and the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory (081.C-0388 and 083.C-0186). The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by the CNES with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brasil, ESA, Germany, and Spain.Both data sets are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/520/A66</A> [less ▲]

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See detailTransiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission. XII. CoRoT-12b: a short-period low-density planet transiting a solar analog star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hatzes, A.; Csizmadia, Szilard et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 520

We report the discovery by the CoRoT satellite of a new transiting giant planet in a 2.83 days orbit about a V = 15.5 solar analog star (M_* = 1.08 ± 0.08 M_ȯ, R_* = 1.1 ± 0.1 R_ȯ, T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5675 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by the CoRoT satellite of a new transiting giant planet in a 2.83 days orbit about a V = 15.5 solar analog star (M_* = 1.08 ± 0.08 M_ȯ, R_* = 1.1 ± 0.1 R_ȯ, T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5675 ± 80 K). This new planet, CoRoT-12b, has a mass of 0.92 ± 0.07 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 1.44 ± 0.13 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. Its low density can be explained by standard models for irradiated planets. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27, 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Program), Germany and Spain. [less ▲]

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See detailSolar-like Oscillations in Low-luminosity Red Giants: First Results from Kepler
Bedding, T. R.; Huber, D.; Stello, D. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 713

We have measured solar-like oscillations in red giants using time-series photometry from the first 34 days of science operations of the Kepler Mission. The light curves, obtained with 30 minute sampling ... [more ▼]

We have measured solar-like oscillations in red giants using time-series photometry from the first 34 days of science operations of the Kepler Mission. The light curves, obtained with 30 minute sampling, reveal clear oscillations in a large sample of G and K giants, extending in luminosity from the red clump down to the bottom of the giant branch. We confirm a strong correlation between the large separation of the oscillations (Πν) and the frequency of maximum power (ν[SUB]max[/SUB]). We focus on a sample of 50 low-luminosity stars (ν[SUB]max[/SUB] > 100 μHz, L <~ 30 L [SUB]sun[/SUB]) having high signal-to-noise ratios and showing the unambiguous signature of solar-like oscillations. These are H-shell-burning stars, whose oscillations should be valuable for testing models of stellar evolution and for constraining the star formation rate in the local disk. We use a new technique to compare stars on a single échelle diagram by scaling their frequencies and find well-defined ridges corresponding to radial and non-radial oscillations, including clear evidence for modes with angular degree l = 3. Measuring the small separation between l = 0 and l = 2 allows us to plot the so-called C-D diagram of δν[SUB]02[/SUB] versus Πν. The small separation δν[SUB]01[/SUB] of l = 1 from the midpoint of adjacent l = 0 modes is negative, contrary to the Sun and solar-type stars. The ridge for l = 1 is notably broadened, which we attribute to mixed modes, confirming theoretical predictions for low-luminosity giants. Overall, the results demonstrate the tremendous potential of Kepler data for asteroseismology of red giants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Asteroseismic Potential of Kepler: First Results for Solar-Type Stars
Chaplin, W. J.; Appourchaux, T.; Elsworth, Y. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 713

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise ... [more ▼]

We present preliminary asteroseismic results from Kepler on three G-type stars. The observations, made at one-minute cadence during the first 33.5 days of science operations, reveal high signal-to-noise solar-like oscillation spectra in all three stars: about 20 modes of oscillation may be clearly distinguished in each star. We discuss the appearance of the oscillation spectra, use the frequencies and frequency separations to provide first results on the radii, masses, and ages of the stars, and comment in the light of these results on prospects for inference on other solar-type stars that Kepler will observe. [less ▲]

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