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See detailGreenland ice-sheet contribution to sea-level rise buffered by meltwater storage in firn
Harper, J.; Humphrey, N.; Pfeffer, W. et al

in Nature (2012), 491

Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much ... [more ▼]

Surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet has shown increasing trends in areal extent and duration since the beginning of the satellite era. Records for melt were broken in 2005, 2007, 2010 and 2012. Much of the increased surface melt is occurring in the percolation zone, a region of the accumulation area that is perennially covered by snow and firn (partly compacted snow). The fate of melt water in the percolation zone is poorly constrained: some may travel away from its point of origin and eventually influence the ice sheet’s flow dynamics and mass balance and the global sea level, whereas some may simply infiltrate into cold snow or firn and refreeze with none of these effects. Here we quantify the existing water storage capacity of the percolation zone of the Greenland ice sheet and show the potential for hundreds of gigatonnes of meltwater storage. We collected in situ observations of firn structure and meltwater retention along a roughly 85-kilometre-long transect of the melting accumulation area. Our data show that repeated infiltration events in which melt water penetrates deeply (more than 10 metres) eventually fill all pore space with water. As future surface melt intensifies under Arctic warming, a fraction of melt water that would otherwise contribute to sea-level rise will fill existing pore space of the percolation zone. We estimate the lower and upper bounds of this storage sink to be 322 ± 44 gigatonnes and 1.289 gigatonnes, respectively. Furthermore, we find that decades are required to fill this pore space under a range of plausible future climate conditions. Hence, routing of surface melt water into filling the pore space of the firn column will delay expansion of the area contributing to sea-level rise, although once the pore space is filled it cannot quickly be regenerated. [less ▲]

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See detailFive years of denosumab exposure in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: Results from the first two years of the FREEDOM extension.
Papapoulos, S.; Chapurlat, R.; Libanati, C. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2012), 27(3), 694-701

The 3-year FREEDOM trial assessed the efficacy and safety of 60 mg denosumab every 6 months for treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Participants who completed FREEDOM were eligible to ... [more ▼]

The 3-year FREEDOM trial assessed the efficacy and safety of 60 mg denosumab every 6 months for treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Participants who completed FREEDOM were eligible to enter an extension to continue the evaluation of denosumab efficacy and safety for up to 10 years. For the extension results presented here, women from the FREEDOM denosumab group had 2 more years of denosumab treatment (long-term group) and those from the FREEDOM placebo group had 2 years of denosumab exposure (cross-over group). We report results for bone turnover markers (BTMs), bone mineral density (BMD), fractures rates, and safety. A total of 4550 women enrolled in the extension (2343 long-term; 2207 cross-over). Reductions in BTMs were maintained (long-term group) or occurred rapidly (cross-over group) following denosumab administration. In the long-term group, lumbar spine and total hip BMD increased further, resulting in 5-year gains of 13.7% and 7.0%, respectively. In the cross-over group, BMD increased at the lumbar spine (7.7%) and total hip (4.0%) during the 2-year denosumab treatment. Yearly fracture incidences for both groups were below rates observed in the FREEDOM placebo group and below rates projected for a "virtual untreated twin" cohort. Adverse events did not increase with long-term denosumab administration. Two adverse events in the cross-over group were adjudicated as consistent with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Five-year denosumab treatment of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis maintained BTM reduction and increased BMD, and was associated with low fracture rates and a favorable risk/benefit profile. (c) 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

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See detailClinically meaningful effect of strontium ranelate on knee osteoarthritis symptoms
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Bellamy, N; Brown, J et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 110

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See detailFive-year Denosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the first two years of the freedom trial extension
Papapoulos, S.; Man, Z.; Mellstrom, D. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011, March), 22(Suppl.1), 107-108

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See detailTraitement durant cinq ans par denosumab (DMAb) chez des femmes ménopausées ostéoporotiques : résultats d'efficacité des deux premières années de l'extension de l'essai FREEDOM
Chapurlat, R.; Roux, C.; Papapoulos, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(S5), 214

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See detailLong-term denosuamab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis : results from the first two years of the FREEDOM trial extension
Bone, H.; Chapurlat, R.; Brandi, M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(S4), 527-528

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See detailSustained fracture risk reduction over 5 years with risedronate therapy
Watts, NB; Brown, J; Hosking, D et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2001), 16(S1), 217

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See detailRisedronate : dose response in Paget's disease
Bekker, P; Valentin-Opran, A; Brown, J et al

in Bone and Mineral (1992), 17(S1), 536

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