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See detailWASP-104b and WASP-106b: two transiting hot Jupiters in 1.75-day and 9.3-day orbits
Smith, A. M. S.; Anderson, D. R.; Armstrong, D. J. et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d, whereas WASP-106b has the fourth-longest orbital period of any planet discovered by means of transits observed from the ground, orbiting every 9.29 d. Each planet is more massive than Jupiter (WASP-104b has a mass of 1.27±0.05 MJup, while WASP-106b has a mass of 1.93±0.08 MJup). Both planets are just slightly larger than Jupiter, with radii of 1.14±0.04 and 1.09±0.04 RJup for WASP-104 and WASP-106 respectively. No significant orbital eccentricity is detected in either system, and while this is not surprising in the case of the short-period WASP-104b, it is interesting in the case of WASP-106b, because many otherwise similar planets are known to have eccentric orbits. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-20b and WASP-28b: a hot Saturn and a hot Jupiter in near-aligned orbits around solar-type stars
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hellier, C. et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We report the discovery of the planets WASP-20b and WASP-28b along with measurements of their sky-projected orbital obliquities. WASP-20b is an inflated, Saturn-mass planet (0.31 $M_{\rm Jup}$; 1.46 $R ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the planets WASP-20b and WASP-28b along with measurements of their sky-projected orbital obliquities. WASP-20b is an inflated, Saturn-mass planet (0.31 $M_{\rm Jup}$; 1.46 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 4.9-day, near-aligned ($\lambda = 8.1 \pm 3.6^\circ$) orbit around CD-24 102 ($V$=10.7; F9). WASP-28b is an inflated, Jupiter-mass planet (0.91 $M_{\rm Jup}$; 1.21 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a 3.4-day, near-aligned ($\lambda = 8 \pm 18^\circ$) orbit around a $V$=12, F8 star. As intermediate-mass planets in short orbits around aged, cool stars ($7^{+2}_{-1}$ Gyr for WASP-20 and $5^{+3}_{-2}$ Gyr for WASP-28; both with $T_{\rm eff}$ < 6250 K), their orbital alignment is consistent with the hypothesis that close-in giant planets are scattered into eccentric orbits with random alignments, which are then circularised and aligned with their stars' spins via tidal dissipation. [less ▲]

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See detailAlignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel
Greaves, J. S.; Kennedy, G. M.; Thureau, N. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society : Letters (2014), 438

Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral ... [more ▼]

Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A-M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ≲ 10°. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of au are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of WASP-65b and WASP-75b: Two Hot Jupiters Without Highly Inflated Radii
Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013)

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of two transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-65b (Mpl = 1.55 ± 0.16 MJ; Rpl = 1.11 ± 0.06 RJ), and WASP-75b (Mpl = 1.07 ± 0.05 MJ; Rpl = 1.27 ± 0.05 RJ). They orbit their host star every ~2.311, and ~2.484 days, respectively. The planet host WASP-65 is a G6 star (Teff = 5600 K, [Fe/H] = -0.07 ± 0.07, age ≳8 Gyr); WASP-75 is an F9 star (Teff = 6100 K, [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.09, age ~ 3 Gyr). WASP-65b is one of the densest known exoplanets in the mass range 0.1 and 2.0 MJ (rhopl = 1.13 ± 0.08 rhoJ), a mass range where a large fraction of planets are found to be inflated with respect to theoretical planet models. WASP-65b is one of only a handful of planets with masses of ~1.5 MJ, a mass regime surprisingly underrepresented among the currently known hot Jupiters. The radius of WASP-75b is slightly inflated (≲10%) as compared to theoretical planet models with no core, and has a density similar to that of Saturn (rhopl = 0.52 ± 0.06 rhoJ). [less ▲]

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See detailThree irradiated and bloated hot Jupiters: WASP-76b, WASP-82b & WASP-90b
West, R. G.; Almenara, J.-M.; Anderson, D. R. et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

We report three new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered from the WASP surveys combined with radial velocities from OHP/SOPHIE and Euler/CORALIE and photometry from Euler and TRAPPIST. All three ... [more ▼]

We report three new transiting hot-Jupiter planets discovered from the WASP surveys combined with radial velocities from OHP/SOPHIE and Euler/CORALIE and photometry from Euler and TRAPPIST. All three planets are inflated, with radii 1.7-1.8 Rjup. All orbit hot stars, F5-F7, and all three stars have evolved, post-MS radii (1.7-2.2 Rsun). Thus the three planets, with orbits of 1.8-3.9 d, are among the most irradiated planets known. This reinforces the correlation between inflated planets and stellar irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of Spin-Orbit Alignment in the WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40 Systems
Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Díaz, R. F. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2012), 760

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the ... [more ▼]

We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, λ, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6140[SUP]+90[/SUP] [SUB]- 100[/SUB] K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of λ = 10fdg5[SUP] + 6.4[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.5[/SUB] obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6180[SUP]+40[/SUP] [SUB]- 60[/SUB] K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding λ = 7fdg5[SUP] + 4.7[/SUP] [SUB] - 6.1[/SUB]. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in λ compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5190[SUP]+160[/SUP] [SUB]- 170[/SUB] K) to λ = 24fdg2[SUP] + 76.0[/SUP] [SUB] - 44.5[/SUB], owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends. Based on observations (under proposal 087.C-0649) made using the HARPS High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph mounted on the ESO 3.6 m at the ESO La Silla observatory. [less ▲]

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See detailRossiter-McLaughlin effect measurements for WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31★
Brown, D J A; Cameron, A Collier; Anderson, D R et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2012)

We present new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect for three Wide Angle Search for transiting Planets (WASP) planetary systems, WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31, from a combined analysis of ... [more ▼]

We present new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect for three Wide Angle Search for transiting Planets (WASP) planetary systems, WASP-16, WASP-25 and WASP-31, from a combined analysis of their complete sets of photometric and spectroscopic data. We find a low-amplitude RM effect for WASP-16 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 5700 ± 150 K), suggesting that the star is a slow rotator and thus of an advanced age, and obtain a projected alignment angle of ?. For WASP-25 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 5750 ± 100 K), we detect a projected spin-orbit angle of λ= 14°.6 ± 6°.7. WASP-31 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB]= 6300 ± 100 K) is found to be well aligned, with a projected spin-orbit angle of λ= 2°.8 ± 3°.1. A circular orbit is consistent with the data for all three systems, in agreement with their respective discovery papers. We consider the results for these systems in the context of the ensemble of RM measurements made to date. We find that whilst WASP-16 fits the hypothesis of Winn et al. that 'cool' stars (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] < 6250 K) are preferentially aligned, WASP-31 has little impact on the proposed trend. We bring the total distribution of the true spin-orbit alignment angle, ψ, up to date, noting that recent results have improved the agreement with the theory of Fabrycky & Tremaine at mid-range angles. We also suggest a new test for judging misalignment using the Bayesian information criterion, according to which WASP-25 b's orbit should be considered to be aligned. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-35b, WASP-48b and WASP-51b: Two new planets and an independent discovery of HAT-P-30b
Enoch, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Barros, S. C. C. et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2011), 142(3), 86

We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of WASP-35b, a planet transiting a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.15) star in the Southern hemisphere, WASP-48b, an inflated planet which may have spun-up its slightly evolved host star of 1.75 R_sun in the Northern hemisphere, and the independent discovery of HAT-P-30b / WASP-51b, a new planet in the Northern hemisphere. Using WASP, RISE, FTS and TRAPPIST photometry, with CORALIE, SOPHIE and NOT spectroscopy, we determine that WASP-35b has a mass of 0.72 +/- 0.06 M_J and radius of 1.32 +/- 0.03 R_J, and orbits with a period of 3.16 days, WASP-48b has a mass of 0.98 +/- 0.09 M_J, radius of 1.67 +/- 0.08 R_J and orbits in 2.14 days, while WASP-51b, with an orbital period of 2.81 days, is found to have a mass of 0.76 +/- 0.05 M_J and radius of 1.42 +/- 0.04 R_J, agreeing with values of 0.71 +/- 0.03 M_J and 1.34 +/- 0.07 R_J reported for HAT-P-30b. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-31b: a low-density planet transiting a metal-poor, late-F-type dwarf star
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Hellier, C. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 531

We report the discovery of the low-density, transiting giant planet WASP-31b. The planet is 0.47 Jupiter masses and 1.56 Jupiter radii. It is in a 3.4-day orbit around a 1-Gyr-old, late-F-type, V = 11.7 ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of the low-density, transiting giant planet WASP-31b. The planet is 0.47 Jupiter masses and 1.56 Jupiter radii. It is in a 3.4-day orbit around a 1-Gyr-old, late-F-type, V = 11.7 star, which is a member of a common proper motion pair. In terms of its low density, WASP-31b is second only to WASP-17b, which is a more highly irradiated planet of similar mass. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-25b: a 0.6 M-J planet in the Southern hemisphere
Enoch, B.; Cameron, A Collier; Anderson, D. R. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 410(3), 16311636

We report the detection of a 0.6 M-J extrasolar planet by WASP-South, WASP-25b, transiting its solar-type host star every 3.76d. A simultaneous analysis of the WASP, FTS and Euler photometry and CORALIE ... [more ▼]

We report the detection of a 0.6 M-J extrasolar planet by WASP-South, WASP-25b, transiting its solar-type host star every 3.76d. A simultaneous analysis of the WASP, FTS and Euler photometry and CORALIE spectroscopy yields a planet of R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.22 R[SUB]J[/SUB] and M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.58 M[SUB]J[/SUB] around a slightly metal-poor solar-type host star, [Fe/H] = - 0.05 +/- 0.10, of R[SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.92 R[SUB]solar[/SUB] and M[SUB]*[/SUB] = 1.00 M[SUB]solar[/SUB]. WASP-25b is found to have a density of ρ[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.32 ρ[SUB]J[/SUB], a low value for a sub-Jupiter mass planet. We investigate the relationship of planetary radius to planetary equilibrium temperature and host star metallicity for transiting exoplanets with a similar mass to WASP-25b, finding that these two parameters explain the radii of most low-mass planets well. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-29b: A Saturn-sized Transiting Exoplanet
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Letters (2010), 723

We report the discovery of a Saturn-sized planet transiting a V = 11.3, K4 dwarf star every 3.9 days. WASP-29b has a mass of 0.24 ± 0.02 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 0.79 ± 0.05 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a Saturn-sized planet transiting a V = 11.3, K4 dwarf star every 3.9 days. WASP-29b has a mass of 0.24 ± 0.02 M [SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a radius of 0.79 ± 0.05 R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], making it the smallest planet so far discovered by the WASP survey, and the exoplanet most similar in mass and radius to Saturn. The host star WASP-29 has an above-solar metallicity and fits a possible correlation for Saturn-mass planets such that planets with higher-metallicity host stars have higher core masses and thus smaller radii. [less ▲]

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