References of "Briquet, Alexandra"
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See detailThe role of mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (in press)

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See detailThe use of mesenchymal stromal cells in solid organ transplantation
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; Jouret, François ULg et al

in The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (in press)

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See detailCellules stromales mésenchymateuses et transplantation d'organes
DETRY, Olivier ULg; JOURET, François ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing cells. MSC are studied for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory effects, in the prevention or the treatment of ischemic injury, and ... [more ▼]

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing cells. MSC are studied for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory effects, in the prevention or the treatment of ischemic injury, and for their potential properties of tissue or organ reconstruction. Over the last few years, the potential role of MSC in organ transplantation has been studied both in vitro and in vivo, and their properties make them an ideal potential cell therapy after solid organ transplantation. A prospective, controlled, phase 1-2 study has been initiated at the CHU of Liege, Belgium. This study assesses the potential risks and benefits of MSC infusion after liver or kidney transplantation. Even if the preliminary results of this study look promising, solely a prospective, randomized, large scale, phase 3 study will allow the clinical confirmation of the theoretical benefits of MSC in solid organ transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stromal cell therapy in conditions of renal ischaemia/reperfusion.
Erpicum, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (2014), 29

Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a worldwide public health issue of increasing incidence, with a significant morbi-mortality. AKI treatment mostly relies on supportive manoeuvres in the absence of ... [more ▼]

Acute kidney injury (AKI) represents a worldwide public health issue of increasing incidence, with a significant morbi-mortality. AKI treatment mostly relies on supportive manoeuvres in the absence of specific target-oriented therapy. The pathophysiology of AKI commonly involves ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) events, which cause both immune and metabolic consequences in renal tissue. Similarly, at the time of kidney transplantation (KT), I/R is an unavoidable event which contributes to early graft dysfunction and enhanced graft immunogenicity. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of adult, fibroblast-like multi-potent cells characterized by their ability to differentiate into tissues of mesodermal lineages. Because MSC have demonstrated immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and tissue repair properties, MSC administration at the time of I/R and/or at later times has been hypothesized to attenuate AKI severity and to accelerate the regeneration process. Furthermore, MSC in KT could help prevent both I/R injury and acute rejection, thereby increasing graft function and survival. In this review, summarizing the encouraging observations in animal models and in pilot clinical trials, we outline the benefit of MSC therapy in AKI and KT, and envisage their putative role in renal ischaemic conditioning. [less ▲]

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See detailRationale for the potential use of mesenchymal stromal cells in liver transplantation.
VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in World journal of gastroenterology : WJG (2014), 20(44), 16418-32

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewing cells that reside essentially in the bone marrow as a non-hematopoietic cell population, but may also be isolated from the connective ... [more ▼]

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewing cells that reside essentially in the bone marrow as a non-hematopoietic cell population, but may also be isolated from the connective tissues of most organs. MSCs represent a heterogeneous population of adult, fibroblast-like cells characterized by their ability to differentiate into tissues of mesodermal lineages including adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes. For several years now, MSCs have been evaluated for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory and 'tissue reconstruction' properties, which could make them interesting in various clinical settings, and particularly in organ transplantation. This paper aims to review current knowledge on the properties of MSCs and their use in pre-clinical and clinical studies in solid organ transplantation, and particularly in the field of liver transplantation. The first available clinical data seem to show that MSCs are safe to use, at least in the medium-term, but more time is needed to evaluate the potential adverse effects of long-term use. Many issues must be resolved on the correct use of MSCs. Intensive in vitro and pre-clinical research are the keys to a better understanding of the way that MSCs act, and to eventually lead to clinical success. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of a murine graft-versus-myeloma model using allogeneic stem cell transplantation
Binsfeld, Marilène ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg; Belle, Ludovic et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), (doi:10.1371), 113764

Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with poor long-term survival and high recurrence rates. Despite evidence of graft-versus-myeloma (GvM) effects, the use of allogeneic ... [more ▼]

Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with poor long-term survival and high recurrence rates. Despite evidence of graft-versus-myeloma (GvM) effects, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has remained controversial in MM. In the current study, we investigated the anti-myeloma effects of allo-SCT from B10.D2 mice into MHC-matched myeloma-bearing Balb/cJ mice (previously injected with the MOPC315.BM myeloma cell line), based on a chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) murine model. Methods and results: Balb/cJ mice were injected intravenously with luciferase-transfected MOPC315.BM cells, and received 30 days later an allogeneic (B10.D2 donor) or autologous (Balb/cJ donor) transplantation by intravenous administration of bone marrow cells and splenocytes. We observed a graft-versus-myeloma effect in 94% of the allogeneic transplanted mice, as luciferase signal completely disappeared after transplantation, whereas all the autologous transplanted mice showed myeloma evolution. Lower serum paraprotein levels and myeloma infiltration in bone marrow and spleen in the allogeneic setting confirmed the observed GvM effect, while allogeneic mice also displayed chronic GvHD symptoms. In vivo and in vitro data suggest the involvement of effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells in the GvM effect. The essential role of CD8 T cells was demonstrated in vivo where CD8 T-cell depletion of the graft resulted in reduced GvM effects. Finally, TCR V spectratyping analysis identified V families within CD4 and CD8 T cells which were associated with both GvM effects and GVHD, whereas other V families within CD4 T cells were associated exclusively with either GvM or GvHD responses. Conclusions: We successfully established an immunocompetent murine model of graft-versus-myeloma. This is the first immunocompetent murine model which is based on a MM model closely resembling human MM disease (bone marrow tropism, ...) and using allo-SCT after the disease establishment, as a curative treatment [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-Scale Clinical Expansion of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the GMP-Compliant, Closed Automated Quantum® Cell Expansion System: Comparison with Expansion in Traditional T-Flasks
LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; Baila, Stefano; Janssen, Michel Etienne et al

in Journal of Stem Cell Research & Therapy (2014), 4(8),

Objectives: Significant advances have been achieved regarding the knowledge of the immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We are currently involved in several clinical protocols ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Significant advances have been achieved regarding the knowledge of the immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We are currently involved in several clinical protocols evaluating these properties in different settings including hematopoietic cells or solid organ transplantation, and severe or refractory autoimmune disorders. Considering the large number of ex-vivo expanded cells required for these clinical protocols (MSC dose varies from 1 to 4x10-6 MSC/kg patient per infusion), we evaluated the Quantum® device, a GMPcompliant, functionally closed, automated hollow fiber bioreactor system and compared it with our traditional clinical culture system in flasks. Methods: Primary and pre-enriched MSC expansions were simultaneously conducted in both culture systems and evaluated in terms of expansion rates and compliance with quality specifications and ISCT-release criteria. Due to practical considerations, most of the experiments conducted in the bioreactor (P1 and P2 expansions) used thawed MSC. These were compared with both fresh and thawed MSC expansions in flasks. Results: The Quantum® device reproducibly produced therapeutic MSC doses that fulfill ISCT-release criteria, are sterile, devoid of mycoplasma and endotoxin, have normal karyotypes and demonstrate immunosuppressive and differentiation capacities in vitro. Cells also grew faster in the bioreactor than in flasks during passage P1 (doubling time 40 compared to 56 hours in flasks) and P2 expansions but not during the primary expansion phase (P0). Seeding 20x10-6 thawed P2-preselected cells on the device allowed us to harvest 110-276x10-6 MSC after a 7 day expansion; seeding 50x10-6 cells resulted in 291-334x10-6 MSC harvested. Conclusion: In conclusion, the Quantum® device is an excellent system to produce a clinical dose of MSC but cost-effectiveness varies as a function of the manufacturing strategy in place. For our particular situation, the use of the Quantum device didn't result in a cost saving solution. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman bone marrow, umbilical cord or liver mesenchymal stromal cells fail to improve liver function in a model of CCl4-induced liver damage in NOD/SCID/IL-2Ry(null) mice
BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg; GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; Comblain, Fanny ULg et al

in Cytotherapy (2014), 16

Background aims. Transplantation is the gold standard procedure for treating acute and chronic end-stage liver diseases. Given the shortage of organs, the development of cellular sources other than human ... [more ▼]

Background aims. Transplantation is the gold standard procedure for treating acute and chronic end-stage liver diseases. Given the shortage of organs, the development of cellular sources other than human liver is urgent. The main objective of this project was to examine the effect of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) (bone marrow, umbilical cord and liver MSCs) intravenous injection on liver regeneration in a model of hepatic damage in NOD/SCID/IL non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient/Interleukin-2Rg(null) (NSG) mice. Methods. Mice received 3 intraperitoneal injections of CCl4 Carbon tetrachloride per week for 4 weeks. Forty-eight hours after the last injection of CCl4, mice received 500,000 MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline by intravenous injection. We examined hepatic damage by means of quantitative image analysis and blood enzyme analysis 24 h, 1 week or 8 weeks after MSC or phosphate-buffered saline injection. We also examined MSC homing by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction of human albumin. Results. We adapted a model of liver injury in immunodeficient mice. In this model, accumulation of collagen in newly formed scar septa was apparent up to 8 weeks after CCl4 treatment. Human albumin DNA was found in all organs tested. However, intravenous MSC injection, even after CXCR4 C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 transduction and whatever the origin of MSCs, failed to improve liver damage. Conclusions. In this liver injury model, MSCs were propagated in various tissues, particularly filtering organs. For the treatment of hepatic damage, intravenous administration of moderate doses of MSCs does not appear to be effective. Yet, this adapted liver injury model is appropriate for investigating engraftment of human cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThinking out of the box - New approaches to controlling GVHD
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Ehx, Grégory ULg et al

in Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports (2014), 9

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Despite major advances in the understanding of GVHD pathogenesis, standard GVHD ... [more ▼]

Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major limitation of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Despite major advances in the understanding of GVHD pathogenesis, standard GVHD prophylaxis regimens continue to bebased on the combination of a calcineurin inhibitor with an antimetabolite, while first line treatmentsstill relies on high-dose corticosteroids. Further, no second line treatment has emerged thus far in acute or chronic GVHD patients who failed on corticosteroids. After briefly reviewing current standards of GVHD prevention and treatment, this article will discuss recent approaches that might change GVHD prophylaxis / treatment in the next decades, with a special focus on recently developed immunoregulatory strategies based on infusion of mesenchymal stromal or regulatory T-cells, or on injection of lowdose interleukin-2. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of a murine graft-versus-myeloma model using allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
Binsfeld, Marilène ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg; Belle, Ludovic et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2014)

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See detailImpact of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Bruck, France; Belle, Ludovic ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg et al

in Cytotherapy (2013), 15(3), 267-279

Background aims. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation caused by donor T cells reacting against host tissues. Previous ... [more ▼]

Background aims. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation caused by donor T cells reacting against host tissues. Previous studies have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) could exert potent immunosuppressive effects. Methods. The ability of human bone marrow derived MSCs to prevent xenogeneic GVHD in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice and in NOD/SCID/interleukin-2Rg(null) (NSG) mice transplanted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed. Results. Injection of 200 106 human PBMCs intraperitoneally (IP) into sub-lethally (3.0 Gy) irradiated NOD/SCID mice also given anti-asialo GM1 antibodies IP 1 day prior and 8 days after transplantation induced lethal xenogeneic GVHD in all tested mice. Co-injection of 2 106 MSCs IP on day 0 did not prevent lethal xenogeneic GVHD induced by injection of human PBMCs. Similarly, injection of 30 106 human PBMCs IP into sub-lethally (2.5 Gy) irradiated NSG mice induced a lethal xenogeneic GVHD in all tested mice. Injection of 3 106 MSCs IP on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 did not prevent lethal xenogeneic GVHD induced by injection of human PBMCs. Conclusions. Injection of MSCs did not prevent xenogeneic GVHD in these two humanized mice models. [less ▲]

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See detailRapamycin Prevents Experimental Sclerodermatous Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease in mice
Belle, Ludovic ULg; Binsfeld, Marilène ULg; DUBOIS, Sophie ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2012), Abstracts book(Supplement of 27th General Meeting of the Belgian Hematological Society), 14

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See detailRapamycin prevents experimental sclerodermatous chronic graft-versus-host disease in mice
Belle, Ludovic ULg; Binsfeld, Marilène ULg; DUBOIS, Sophie ULg et al

Conference (2012)

Background: The most widely used mice model of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) is an MHC-matched bone marrow transplantation model of sclerodermatous cGvHD. A limitation of that model is that ... [more ▼]

Background: The most widely used mice model of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) is an MHC-matched bone marrow transplantation model of sclerodermatous cGvHD. A limitation of that model is that mortality is relatively low, making difficult to study the impact of potentially therapeutic compounds. Aims: To develop a more severe model of cGVHD and to assess the impact of Rapamycin administration in that model. Results: Lethally irradiated Balb/C mice were injected with 10x106 bone marrow cells and 70x106 splenocytes from B10.D2 donor mice. Twenty-one days later, all mice developed cGvHD. For the severe model, donor B10.D2 mice were injected with 0.5x106 splenocytes from Balb/C twenty-one days before transplantation. All mice from the severe model (n=8) died a median of 32 days while 3 of 7 mice in the classical model survived beyond day 52. Mean survival was decreased in the severe model compared to the classical model (32 days versus 37 days; p=0.0185). Recipient mice in the severe group experienced higher weight loss, hair loss and skin fi brosis. Numbers of T lymphocytes (231.9 ± 151.4 versus 951 ± 532.8; p=0.0032) and CD4+ T cells (63.25 ± 41.93 versus 135.0 ± 14.39; p=0.0018) per microliter of blood at day 21 were lower in the severe group than in the classical model. Moreover, number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) was decreased in the severe model (1.250 ± 0.8864 versus 8.000 ± 6.753; p=0.0151). We then investigated whether rapamycin administration could prevent GVHD in the severe model. All (n=8) mice treated with PBS (placebo) died a median of 32 days after transplantation, while 6 of 8 mice given 1 mg/kg/day i.p. rapamycin survived beyond day 52 (p=0.0012). Number of Tregs/μl was higher at day 21 in rapamycin-treated mice than in mice given PBS (2.000±1.195 versus 1.250±0.8864; p=0.0796). Moreover, number of naïve CD4+T (10.00±4.192 versus 30.25±5.185; p= 0.0089) and effector memory T cells (EMT) (30.67±3.180 versus 67.33±7.881; p= 0.0125) were higher in rapamycin mice. Finally, proliferation of EMT (assessed by fl ow cytometry using Ki-67) was higher in PBS than in rapamycin mice (45.28%±4.084 versus 31.90%± 2.003; p=0.0474). Conclusion: We have developed a mice model of severe cGVHD. Interestingly, rapamycin prevented death from cGVHD in that model, perhaps through in vivo expansion of Treg. [less ▲]

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See detailBone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells failed to prevent experimental xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease
Bruck, France; de Leval, Laurence; Belle, Ludovic ULg et al

Poster (2012)

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