References of "Briquet, Alexandra"
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See detailThe use of mesenchymal stromal cells in solid organ transplantation
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; Jouret, François ULg et al

in The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (in press)

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See detailAdministration of Third-Party Mesenchymal Stromal Cells at the Time of Kidney Transplantation: Interim Safety Analysis at One-Year Follow-Up
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

Conference (2017, March 16)

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)-based therapy has been proposed in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC in KTx. On postoperative day 3 ... [more ▼]

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)-based therapy has been proposed in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC in KTx. On postoperative day 3, third-party MSC (~2.0x106/kg) were administered to 7 non-immunized first-transplant recip- ients from deceased donors, under standard immunosuppression (Basiliximab, Tacrolimus, MMF and steroids). No HLA matching was required for MSC donors. Seven comparable KTx recipients were included as controls. Informed consent was obtained. No side-effect was noted at the time of MSC injection. Still, 1 patient with a history of ischemic heart disease had a NSTEMI ~3h after MSC infusion. Ten months after KTx, 1 MSC patient had type B aortic dissection and STEMI. Four MSC patients had at least 1 opportunistic infection, whereas 3 controls had polyoma-BK viremia. At day 14, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 47.1 ± 6.8 and 39.7 ± 5.9 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.05). At 1 year, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 46.5 ± 18.6 and 54.2 ± 16.3 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.42). Per-cause biopsies evidenced 1 bor- derline and 1 acute rejections in MSC group, whereas no AR was biopsy-proven in controls. Three patients developed anti-HLA antibodies against MSC (n=1) or shared kidney/MSC (n=2) mismatches.MSC infusion was safe in all patients except one. Incidence of opportunist infections was similar in both groups. No difference in eGFR was found at 1-year post KTx. Putative immunization against MSC was observed in 3 patients. [less ▲]

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See detailUNE INJECTION UNIQUE DE CELLULES STROMALES MESENCHYMATEUSES AU JOUR 3 APRES GREFFE HEPATIQUE EST INSUFFISANTE POUR INDUIRE UNE TOLERANCE OPERATIONNELLE
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2017), 30(suppl 1), 812

Introduction: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish donor-specific immunological tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this phase 2 study was test the hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish donor-specific immunological tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this phase 2 study was test the hypothesis of possible induction of operative tolerance by third-party MSC in liver transplant (LT) recipients. Methods: 10 stable and low-risk LT recipients under standard immunosup- pression (Tac-MMF- low dose steroids) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third-party MSCs on post-operative day 3 ` 2. By protocol, progressive weaning of immunosuppression was attempted in patients who did not develop rejection and had normal graft function and month-6 graft biopsy. Tacrolimus was progressively tapered from day 180 to be discontinued by day 270. After day- 270 graft biopsy, MMF was progressively tapered and definitely discontinued by day 365 in the absence of rejection. Results: One patient from the MSC group was excluded from immunosup- pression withdrawal attempt due to HCC recurrence, and the 9 others met the necessary criteria. In one patient, tacrolimus and MMF withdrawal was performed without rejection. In two patients, MMF monotherapy was achieved at month 9, but graft rejection occurred during MMF withdrawal and was successfully treated by tacrolimus reintroduction. In 6 patients, the transam- inases significantly increased during tacrolimus withdrawal. In these cases, withdrawal was cancelled and liver tests normalised after increase of the tacrolimus dose. No graft was lost due to the withdrawal attempt. Conclusion: A single post transplant MSC injection is not sufficient to induce operative tolerance after LT. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of mesenchymal stromal cells after deceased liver transplantation: A phase I-II, open-label, clinical study.
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2017)

BACKGROUND & AIM: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this prospective, controlled, phase-1 study was to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIM: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this prospective, controlled, phase-1 study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and tolerability of a single infusion of MSCs in liver transplant recipients. METHODS: Ten liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression received 1.5-3x106/kg third-party unrelated MSCs on post-operative day 3+/-2, and were prospectively compared to a control group of 10 liver transplant recipients. As primary end-points, MSC infusional toxicity was evaluated, and infectious and cancerous complications were prospectively recorded until month 12 in both groups. As secondary end-points, rejection rate, month-6 graft biopsies, and peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotyping were compared. Progressive immunosuppression weaning was attempted from month 6 to 12 in MSC recipients. RESULTS: No variation in vital parameters or cytokine release syndrome could be detected during and after MSC infusion. No patient developed impairment of organ functions (including liver graft function) following MSC infusion. No increased rate of opportunistic infection or de novo cancer was detected. As secondary end-points, there was no difference in overall rates of rejection or graft survival. Month-6 biopsies did not demonstrate a difference between groups in the evaluation of rejection according to the Banff criteria, in the fibrosis score or in immunohistochemistry (including Tregs). No difference in peripheral blood lymphocyte typing could be detected. The immunosuppression weaning in MSC recipients was not successful. CONCLUSIONS: No side effect of MSC infusion at day 3 after liver transplant could be detected, but this infusion did not promote tolerance. This study opens the way for further MSC or Treg-based trials in liver transplant recipients. LAY SUMMARY: Therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been proposed as a mean to improve results of solid organ transplantation. One of the potential MSC role could be to induce tolerance after liver transplantation, i.e. allowing the cessation of several medications with severe side effects. This study is the first-in-man use of MSC therapy in 10 liver transplant recipients. This study did not show toxicity after a single MSC infusion but it was not sufficient to allow withdrawal of immunosuppression. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal stromal cell therapy for inflmmatory bowel diseases
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (2017), 45

Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing diseases in which pro-inflammatory immune cells and cytokines induce intestinal tissue damage and disability. Mesenchymal stromal cells ... [more ▼]

Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing diseases in which pro-inflammatory immune cells and cytokines induce intestinal tissue damage and disability. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) exert powerful immunomodulatory effects and stimulate tissue repair. Aim To review the current data on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in IBD. Method We searched PubMed and ‘ClinicalTrials.gov’ databases using the terms ‘mesenchymal stromal cells’, ‘mesenchymal stem cell transplantation’, ‘inflammatory bowel diseases’, ‘Crohn disease’ and ‘colitis, ulcerative’. Additional publications were identified from individual article reference lists. Results MSCs include inhibition of Th1/Th17 lymphocytes and recruitment of regulatory T lymphocytes, induction of antigen-presenting cells into a regulatorylike profile, and stimulation of epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation. More than 200 patients with refractory fistulas have been treated with local injections of MSCs, resulting in complete response in more than half, and in overall response in approximately two thirds of patients. In refractory luminal Crohn’s disease, 49 cases of systemic MSC infusions have been reported, while trials with autologous MSCs resulted in mitigated responses, studies using allogeneic MSCs were promising, with around 60% of patients experiencing a response and around 40% achieving clinical remission. Conclusions Mesenchymal stromal cells might represent a promising therapy for IBD, especially for Crohn’s disease. There remain many unsolved questions concerning the optimal origin and source of mesenchymal stromal cells, dosage and modalities of administration. Moreover, mesenchymal stromal cells still need to prove their effectiveness compared with conventional treatments in randomised controlled trials. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in Atkinson, K; Ed (Eds.) The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (2017)

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See detailAdministration of Third-Party Mesenchymal Stromal Cells at the Time of Kidney Transplantation: Interim Safety Analysis at One-Year Follow-Up
Erpicum, Pauline ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

Conference (2016, April 28)

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx ... [more ▼]

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx. Methods. On postoperative day 3 (D3), third-party MSC (~2.0x106/kg) were administered to 7 non-immunized first-transplant recipients from deceased donors, under standard immunosuppression (Basiliximab, Tacrolimus, MMF and steroids). No HLA matching was required for MSC donors. In parallel, 7 comparable KTx recipients were included as controls. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results. No hemodynamic or immune-allergic side-effect was noted at the time of MSC injection. Still, 1 patient with a history of ischemic heart disease had a NSTEMI ~3h after MSC infusion. Four MSC patients presented with CMV reactivation within 165 ± 96 days post KTx, whereas 3 controls had positive polyoma-BK viremia within 92 ± 4d post KTx. Three MSC patients were affected by pneumonia within 269 ± 98d post KTx, whereas 3 controls had urinary infection within 48 ± 43d post KTx. No MSC engraftment syndrome was observed. At D14, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 47.1 ± 6.8 and 39.7 ± 5.9 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.05). At 1 year, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 43.1 ± 17.8 and 53.9 ± 13.4 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.25). At 3-month protocol biopsy, no rejection was evidenced in MSC or control patients. Later on, 1 acute rejection was diagnosed at D330 in 1 MSC patient. No biopsy-proven AR was noted in controls. Three patients developed anti-HLA antibodies against MSC (n=1) or shared kidney/MSC (n=2) mismatches. Conclusions. MSC infusion was safe in all patients except one. Incidence of opportunist and non-opportunist infections was similar in both MSC and control groups. No MSC engraftment syndrome was documented. No difference in eGFR was found at 1 year post KTx. Putative immunization against MSC was observed in 3 patients. [less ▲]

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See detailMultipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation
SERVAIS, Sophie ULg; GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; BARON, Frédéric ULg et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2016), 7

Steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease is a severe complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. So far, its treatment remains very challenging since the current therapies do not ... [more ▼]

Steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease is a severe complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. So far, its treatment remains very challenging since the current therapies do not offer significant benefits. Among the most recent approaches, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapy has attracted great interest over the past decade. Here, we briefly reviewed the current knowledges about the immunomodulatory properties of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as well as results of preclinical and clinical studies having assessed their efficacy to modulate steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical - scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells: a large banking experience
LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg; GIET, Olivier ULg et al

in Journal of Translational Medicine (2016), 14

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are largely investigated in clinical trials aiming to control inappropriate immune reactions (GVHD, Crohn’s disease, solid organ transplantation). As the ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are largely investigated in clinical trials aiming to control inappropriate immune reactions (GVHD, Crohn’s disease, solid organ transplantation). As the percentage of MSC precursors in bone marrow is very low, these must be expanded in vitro to obtain therapeutic cell doses. We describe here the constitution of an allogeneic human third-party MSC bank from screened healthy volunteer donors in compliance with quality specifications and ISCT-release criteria and report follow-up of different aspects of this activity since 2007. Methods: 68 clinical-grade large-scale MSC cultures were completed and analyzed. The whole process was described, including volunteer donor screening, bone marrow collection, mononuclear cell isolation and expansion over 4 weeks, harvesting, cryopreservation, release, administration and quality controls of the cells (including microbiology, phenotype, and potency assays). Results: From 59 validated donors, 68 cultures were completed (mean of final yields: 886 × 106 cells/culture) and a total of 464 MSC aliquots have been produced and stored in liquid nitrogen (mean of 132.8 × 106 cells/bag). Each MSC batch underwent extensive testing to verify its conformity with EBMT and ISCT release criteria and was individually validated. As of June 1 2015, 314 bags have been released and infused to patients included in 6 different clinical protocols. All thawed MSC units satisfied to release criteria and no infusion-related toxicity was reported. Conclusion: In conclusion, despite low passage cultures, we have been able to create an allogeneic “off-the-shelf” MSC bank with a large number of frozen aliquots and report here an efficient clinical-grade MSC banking activity in place for more than 7 years. Our challenge now is to produce MSC in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP) as, in the meantime, MSC have become considered as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP). Another significant challenge remains the development of relevant potency assay. [less ▲]

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See detailadministration of Third-Party Mesenchymal Stromal Cells at the Time of Kidney Transplantation: Interim Safety Analysis at One-Year Follow-Up
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; Erpicum, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplant International (2016), 29(Suppl 2), 13-6

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx ... [more ▼]

Objective. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) therapy has been suggested in kidney transplantation (KTx). We report on the 1-year follow-up of an open-label phase I trial using MSC at the time of KTx. Methods. On postoperative day 3 (D3), third-party MSC (~2.0x106/kg) were administered to 7 non-immunized first-transplant recipients from deceased donors, under standard immunosuppression (Basiliximab, Tacrolimus, MMF and steroids). No HLA matching was required for MSC donors. In parallel, 7 comparable KTx recipients were included as controls. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results. No hemodynamic or immune-allergic side-effect was noted at the time of MSC injection. Still, 1 patient with a history of ischemic heart disease had a NSTEMI ~3h after MSC infusion. Four MSC patients presented with CMV reactivation within 165 ± 96 days post KTx, whereas 3 controls had positive polyoma-BK viremia within 92 ± 4d post KTx. Three MSC patients were affected by pneumonia within 269 ± 98d post KTx, whereas 3 controls had urinary infection within 48 ± 43d post KTx. No MSC engraftment syndrome was observed. At D14, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 47.1 ± 6.8 and 39.7 ± 5.9 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.05). At 1 year, eGFR in MSC and control groups was 43.1 ± 17.8 and 53.9 ± 13.4 ml/min, respectively (p, 0.25). At 3-month protocol biopsy, no rejection was evidenced in MSC or control patients. Later on, 1 acute rejection was diagnosed at D330 in 1 MSC patient. No biopsy-proven AR was noted in controls. Three patients developed anti-HLA antibodies against MSC (n=1) or shared kidney/MSC (n=2) mismatches. Conclusions. MSC infusion was safe in all patients except one. Incidence of opportunist and non-opportunist infections was similar in both MSC and control groups. No MSC engraftment syndrome was documented. No difference in eGFR was found at 1 year post KTx. Putative immunization against MSC was observed in 3 patients. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-party mesenchymal stem cell infusion in kidney transplant recipient: 6-month safety interim analysis
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 223-224278

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC after kidney transplantation (KTx). Here, we address 3 specific safety issues: immunization against MSC and engraftment syndrome defined as acute graft dysfunction not related to rejection and over-immunosuppression. Patients and method: MSC production was carried out locally. MSC were not matched with kidney recipients’ HLA. Included patients were non-immunized, first transplant recipients from deceased donors. MSC (1.5–3.0 9 106/kg) infusion was planned 3 to 5 days post KTx. Patients with cardiovascular instability post KTx were excluded. All patients were treated with Basiliximab induction, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil and Steroid. We prospectively screened for anti-HLA antibodies at month 1, 3 and 6. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. The local ethical committee approved the protocol. Results: Collectively there were 23/50 and 29/50 HLA mismatches (MM) with kidney and MSC donor respectively, out of which 5 were shared MM. One patient developed de novo DSA, 2 patients anti-HLA antibodies against shared kidney/MSC MM and 1 patient developed 2 specific antibodies against MSC (MSCSA) at month 6. All antibodies were anti HLA class I except for 1. We did not observe any “engraftment” syndrome. Three patients experienced non- severe opportunistic infections: 1 CMV reactivation and 2 polyoma-BK virus viremia.Conclusion: We did not observe any strong safety signal. We did however observe some degree of immunization in 3 patients: 2 developed antibodies against shared kidney/MSC donor HLA MM and 1 MSCSA. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 1027

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Methods: 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third party MSC on post-operative day 3 ` 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. This study is in part supported by an ESOT Senior Clinical Research Grant and by the University of Liege. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stromal cells after liver transplantation: a phase 1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 27)

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases ... [more ▼]

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing bone marrow progenitors that have been shown both in vitro and in vivo as capable of (i) immunomodulation, (ii) anti-inflammation in case of ischemia/reperfusion injury, and (ii) stimulation of tissue repair. MSC could therefore be very interesting in organ recipients to limit chronic graft damage and to allow tolerance. This study aimed to be the first clinical evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled, phase I study. Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post- operative day 3 ± 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. This phase I study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 29

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Patients & Methods: Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailCellules stromales mésenchymateuses et transplantation d'organes
DETRY, Olivier ULg; JOURET, François ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2014), 69

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing cells. MSC are studied for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory effects, in the prevention or the treatment of ischemic injury, and ... [more ▼]

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing cells. MSC are studied for their in vivo and in vitro immunomodulatory effects, in the prevention or the treatment of ischemic injury, and for their potential properties of tissue or organ reconstruction. Over the last few years, the potential role of MSC in organ transplantation has been studied both in vitro and in vivo, and their properties make them an ideal potential cell therapy after solid organ transplantation. A prospective, controlled, phase 1-2 study has been initiated at the CHU of Liege, Belgium. This study assesses the potential risks and benefits of MSC infusion after liver or kidney transplantation. Even if the preliminary results of this study look promising, solely a prospective, randomized, large scale, phase 3 study will allow the clinical confirmation of the theoretical benefits of MSC in solid organ transplantation. [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-Scale Clinical Expansion of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the GMP-Compliant, Closed Automated Quantum® Cell Expansion System: Comparison with Expansion in Traditional T-Flasks
LECHANTEUR, Chantal ULg; Baila, Stefano; Janssen, Michel Etienne et al

in Journal of Stem Cell Research & Therapy (2014), 4(8), 1000222

Objectives: Significant advances have been achieved regarding the knowledge of the immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We are currently involved in several clinical protocols ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Significant advances have been achieved regarding the knowledge of the immunoregulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). We are currently involved in several clinical protocols evaluating these properties in different settings including hematopoietic cells or solid organ transplantation, and severe or refractory autoimmune disorders. Considering the large number of ex-vivo expanded cells required for these clinical protocols (MSC dose varies from 1 to 4x10-6 MSC/kg patient per infusion), we evaluated the Quantum® device, a GMPcompliant, functionally closed, automated hollow fiber bioreactor system and compared it with our traditional clinical culture system in flasks. Methods: Primary and pre-enriched MSC expansions were simultaneously conducted in both culture systems and evaluated in terms of expansion rates and compliance with quality specifications and ISCT-release criteria. Due to practical considerations, most of the experiments conducted in the bioreactor (P1 and P2 expansions) used thawed MSC. These were compared with both fresh and thawed MSC expansions in flasks. Results: The Quantum® device reproducibly produced therapeutic MSC doses that fulfill ISCT-release criteria, are sterile, devoid of mycoplasma and endotoxin, have normal karyotypes and demonstrate immunosuppressive and differentiation capacities in vitro. Cells also grew faster in the bioreactor than in flasks during passage P1 (doubling time 40 compared to 56 hours in flasks) and P2 expansions but not during the primary expansion phase (P0). Seeding 20x10-6 thawed P2-preselected cells on the device allowed us to harvest 110-276x10-6 MSC after a 7 day expansion; seeding 50x10-6 cells resulted in 291-334x10-6 MSC harvested. Conclusion: In conclusion, the Quantum® device is an excellent system to produce a clinical dose of MSC but cost-effectiveness varies as a function of the manufacturing strategy in place. For our particular situation, the use of the Quantum device didn't result in a cost saving solution. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of a murine graft-versus-myeloma model using allogeneic stem cell transplantation
Binsfeld, Marilène ULg; Beguin, Yves ULg; Belle, Ludovic ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), (doi:10.1371), 113764

Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with poor long-term survival and high recurrence rates. Despite evidence of graft-versus-myeloma (GvM) effects, the use of allogeneic ... [more ▼]

Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant plasma cell disorder with poor long-term survival and high recurrence rates. Despite evidence of graft-versus-myeloma (GvM) effects, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has remained controversial in MM. In the current study, we investigated the anti-myeloma effects of allo-SCT from B10.D2 mice into MHC-matched myeloma-bearing Balb/cJ mice (previously injected with the MOPC315.BM myeloma cell line), based on a chronic graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) murine model. Methods and results: Balb/cJ mice were injected intravenously with luciferase-transfected MOPC315.BM cells, and received 30 days later an allogeneic (B10.D2 donor) or autologous (Balb/cJ donor) transplantation by intravenous administration of bone marrow cells and splenocytes. We observed a graft-versus-myeloma effect in 94% of the allogeneic transplanted mice, as luciferase signal completely disappeared after transplantation, whereas all the autologous transplanted mice showed myeloma evolution. Lower serum paraprotein levels and myeloma infiltration in bone marrow and spleen in the allogeneic setting confirmed the observed GvM effect, while allogeneic mice also displayed chronic GvHD symptoms. In vivo and in vitro data suggest the involvement of effector memory CD4 and CD8 T cells in the GvM effect. The essential role of CD8 T cells was demonstrated in vivo where CD8 T-cell depletion of the graft resulted in reduced GvM effects. Finally, TCR V spectratyping analysis identified V families within CD4 and CD8 T cells which were associated with both GvM effects and GVHD, whereas other V families within CD4 T cells were associated exclusively with either GvM or GvHD responses. Conclusions: We successfully established an immunocompetent murine model of graft-versus-myeloma. This is the first immunocompetent murine model which is based on a MM model closely resembling human MM disease (bone marrow tropism, ...) and using allo-SCT after the disease establishment, as a curative treatment [less ▲]

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