References of "Brié, Christophe"
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See detailComparative study on sound production in different Holocentridae species
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg; Brié, Christophe et al

in Frontiers in Zoology (2011), 8

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See detailSound production and mechanism in Heniochus chrysostomus (Chaetodontidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Boyle, Kelly; Berten, Laetitia ULg et al

in Journal of Experimental Biology (2011), 214

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection ... [more ▼]

The diversity in calls and sonic mechanisms appears to be important in Chaetodontidae. Calls in Chaetodon multicinctus seem to include tail slap, jump, pelvic fin flick and dorsal–anal fin erection behaviors. Pulsatile sounds are associated with dorsal elevation of the head, anterior extension of the ventral pectoral girdle and dorsal elevation of the caudal skeleton in Forcipiger flavissiumus. In Hemitaurichthys polylepis, extrinsic swimbladder muscles could be involved in sounds originating from the swimbladder and correspond to the inward buckling of tissues situated dorsally in front of the swimbladder. These examples suggest that this mode of communication could be present in other members of the family. Sounds made by the pennant bannerfish (Heniochus chrysostomus) were recorded for the first time on coral reefs and when fish were hand held. In hand-held fishes, three types of calls were recorded: isolated pulses (51%), trains of four to 11 pulses (19%) and trains preceded by an isolated pulse (29%). Call frequencies were harmonic and had a fundamental frequency between 130 and 180Hz. The fundamental frequency, sound amplitude and sound duration were not related to fish size. Data from morphology, sound analysis and electromyography recordings highlight that the calls are made by extrinsic sonic drumming muscles in association with the articulated bones of the ribcage. The pennant bannerfish system differs from other Chaetodontidae in terms of sound characteristics, associated body movements and, consequently, mechanism. [less ▲]

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See detailColour differentiation in a coral reef fish throughout ontogeny: habitat background and flexibility
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Mills, Suzanne C.; Denoël, Mathieu ULg et al

in Aquatic Biology (2010), 9(3), 271-277

Colour polymorphism is widespread in animals but, in contrast to other types of polymorphism, has been little explored during ontogeny. Among coral reef fish, the surge damselfish Chrysiptera leucopoma ... [more ▼]

Colour polymorphism is widespread in animals but, in contrast to other types of polymorphism, has been little explored during ontogeny. Among coral reef fish, the surge damselfish Chrysiptera leucopoma settles in the larval stage as a yellow morph, whereas 2 colour morphs (yellow and brown) are apparent in adults at Rangiroa Atoll, French Polynesia. To understand this dimorphism, we tested, under controlled conditions, the hypotheses that: (1) environmental cues (habitat background and conspecific density) play important roles in morph differentiation during ontogeny and (2) morph colouration is reversible. Our first experiment showed that a dark habitat background induced the formation of the brown morph, while C. leucopoma larvae kept their yellow morph when placed in aquaria with a bright habitat background. Colour change from yellow to brown also occurred within the bright habitat, but only at high conspecific densities. Our second experiment showed that colour change was reversible within 15 d post-settlement, but not at the adult stage. Overall, our results highlighted that the studied polymorphism may be environmentally induced and reversible during the first post-settlement days of this coral reef fish. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production in four damselfish (Dascyllus) species: phyletic relationships?
Parmentier, Eric ULg; Lecchini, David; Frederich, Bruno ULg et al

in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (2009), 97

Most studies of fish sounds show that the sounds are species-specific, with unique spectral and timing characteristics. This raises the question as to whether these sounds can be used to understand ... [more ▼]

Most studies of fish sounds show that the sounds are species-specific, with unique spectral and timing characteristics. This raises the question as to whether these sounds can be used to understand phyletic relationships between species and which acoustic parameters are subject to variation between species. In the present study, 597 sounds (and 2540 pulses) related to signal jumps of four Dascyllus species (Dascyllus aruanus, Dascyllus trimaculatus, Dascyllus albisella, and Dascyllus flavicaudus) from different geographic regions (Madagascar, Moorea, Rangiroa, and Hawaii) were analysed. It was possible to discern species-specific sounds, but also variation in sounds between populations. Large variations in sound length were found between Dascyllus species, whereas differences in interpulse duration were found to be variable between populations. In the regions where species live in sympatry, it appears that they restrict the variability in their sounds. This could comprise evidence of adaptation with character displacement of sonic characteristics where different species co-occur. However, sonic characteristics still overlapped substantially between species, suggesting that females would need to sample more than one sound and potentially use other cues to discriminate between species. [less ▲]

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See detailOntogenetic determinism of colour polymorphism in a coral reef fish, Chrysiptera brownriggii (Pomacentridae)
Frederich, Bruno ULg; Brié, Christophe; Santos, Raphael et al

Poster (2008, October)

The determinism of ontogenetic colour changes induced by environmental factors is poorly understood in marine fishes, especially in coral ecosystems. The present study, conducted at the Rangiroa Atoll ... [more ▼]

The determinism of ontogenetic colour changes induced by environmental factors is poorly understood in marine fishes, especially in coral ecosystems. The present study, conducted at the Rangiroa Atoll (French Polynesia) explored the effects of fish density and brightness/darkness condition (type of background) on colour determination during the ontogeny of a territorial damselfish Chrysiptera brownriggii (Bennett 1828). In this species, larvae always colonize the reef (settlement) in a yellow morph, while juveniles and adults can display two distinct colour-patterns: yellow and dark brown. Our experiments in aquaria showed that a significant higher proportion of C. brownriggii larvae turned into the brown morph in a dark condition during a period of 5 and 15 days (70-100% of brown morph induction) just after reef settlement. A significant positive effect of fish density inducing a brown colour morph was also highlighted. After a first colour induction, reversibility experiments illustrated that juveniles can change their colour morph anew after a 5-day period. Although a shift from brown to yellow morph seemed to be more limited. In the dark condition, yellow adults did not change their colour after a 5-day period. Our results showed that the colour dimorphism in C. brownriggii should be density-dependent. The period of sensitivity seems to last throughout the post-settlement period. We suggest that the yellow morph in C. brownriggii can be viewed as a paedomorphic trait. Overall, our results reveal that a darkness/lightness environment and fish density are environmental cues related to colour determinism in the polyphenetic C. brownriggii. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal variability of settlement in Carapidae larvae at Rangiroa atoll
Colleye, Orphal; Brié, Christophe; Malpot, Emmanuel et al

in Environmental Biology of Fishes (2007), 81(3), 277-285

Carapidae (or pearlfish) are eel-like fishes living inside different invertebrates, such as holothurians, sea stars or bivalves. In some Polynesian areas where they live in sympatry, <br />several species ... [more ▼]

Carapidae (or pearlfish) are eel-like fishes living inside different invertebrates, such as holothurians, sea stars or bivalves. In some Polynesian areas where they live in sympatry, <br />several species (Carapus homei, Carapus mourlani, Carapus boraborensis and Encheliophis <br />gracilis) are able to inhabit the same host species. The heterospecific infestation rate is very rare, suggesting that the four species can compete for their hosts. Some differences in <br />settlement period, breeding period and in pelagic larval duration (PLD) could allow better characterisation of the life history of each species. More than 700 larvae were collected during an entire year on the Rangiroa atoll (French Polynesia). Each species was identified; their settlement pattern was examined and their PLD was deduced from otolith (sagittae) increments. In the four collected species, the settlement pattern differed: C. homei and C. mourlani settle on the reef during the entire year, and show an asynchronous and diffuse breeding cycle. C. boraborensis and E. gracilis have a shorter settlement period which could be compatible with breeding synchronisation. As most reef fishes, Carapidae larvae mainly settle during moonless nights. Moreover, each species presents some plasticity, allowing it to settle on the reef under suitable conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal variability of settlement in Carapidae larvae (Teleostei) at Rangiroa atoll
Colleye, Orphal ULg; Brié, Christophe; Vandewalle, Pierre ULg et al

Poster (2005)

Carapidae (or pearlfish) are eel-like fishes living inside different invertebrates, such as holothurians, sea stars or bivalves. In some Polynesian areas where they live in sympatry, several species ... [more ▼]

Carapidae (or pearlfish) are eel-like fishes living inside different invertebrates, such as holothurians, sea stars or bivalves. In some Polynesian areas where they live in sympatry, several species (Carapus homei, Carapus mourlani, Carapus boraborensis and Encheliophis gracilis) are able to inhabit the same host species. The heterospecific infestation rate is very rare, suggesting that the four species can compete for their hosts. Some differences in settlement period, breeding period and in pelagic larval duration (PLD) could allow better characterisation of the life history of each species. More than 700 larvae were collected during an entire year on the Rangiroa atoll (French Polynesia). Each species was identified; their settlement pattern was examined and their PLD was deduced from otolith (sagittae) increments. In the four collected species, the settlement pattern differed: C. homei and C. mourlani settle on the reef during the entire year, and show an asynchronous and diffuse breeding cycle. C. boraborensis and E. gracilis have a shorter settlement period which could be compatible with breeding synchronisation. As most reef fishes, Carapidae larvae mainly settle during moonless nights. Moreover, each species presents some plasticity, allowing it to settle on the reef under suitable conditions. [less ▲]

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