References of "Brassard, P"
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See detailPulsational Mode Identification Based on Chromatic Amplitude Behaviour: Recent Results for Rapidly Oscillating Subdwarf B Stars
Randall, S.K.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P. et al

in Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (2012, October), 462

We present recent results from mode identification based on the amplitude-wavelength behaviour for three rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars: HS 2201+2610, EC 11583–2708 and EC 20338–1925.

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See detailThe Physics of Pulsating White Dwarf Stars
Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Charpinet, S. et al

in Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series (2012, September), 462

We present a summary of the properties of white dwarf stars, beginning with a brief reminder of their basic characteristics. We continue with a discussion of the spectral types, evolution, and other ... [more ▼]

We present a summary of the properties of white dwarf stars, beginning with a brief reminder of their basic characteristics. We continue with a discussion of the spectral types, evolution, and other properties of cooling white dwarfs, with an emphasis on the internal physics. We then introduce the pulsating white dwarfs and provide an updated view of their status. We finally discuss the impact (real and potential) of asteroseismology on our knowledge of degenerate stars. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of a New AM CVn System with the Kepler Satellite
Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.; Green, E. M. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2011), 726

We report the discovery of a new AM CVn system on the basis of broadband photometry obtained with the Kepler satellite supplemented by ground-based optical spectroscopy. Initially retained on Kepler ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a new AM CVn system on the basis of broadband photometry obtained with the Kepler satellite supplemented by ground-based optical spectroscopy. Initially retained on Kepler target lists as a potential compact pulsator, the blue object SDSS J190817.07+394036.4 (KIC 004547333) has turned out to be a high-state AM CVn star showing the He-dominated spectrum of its accretion disk significantly reddened by interstellar absorption. We constructed new grids of NLTE synthetic spectra for accretion disks in order to analyze our spectroscopic observations. From this analysis, we infer preliminary estimates of the rate of mass transfer, the inclination angle of the disk, and the distance to the system. The AM CVn nature of the system is also evident in the Kepler light curve, from which we extracted 11 secure periodicities. The luminosity variations are dominated by a basic periodicity of 938.507 s, likely to correspond to a superhump modulation. The light curve folded on the period of 938.507 s exhibits a pulse shape that is very similar to the superhump wavefront seen in AM CVn itself, which is a high-state system and the prototype of the class. Our Fourier analysis also suggests the likely presence of a quasi-periodic oscillation similar to those already observed in some high-state AM CVn systems. Furthermore, some very low-frequency, low-amplitude aperiodic photometric activity is likely present, which is in line with what is expected in accreting binary systems. Inspired by previous work, we further looked for and found some intriguing numerical relationships between the 11 secure detected frequencies, in the sense that we can account for all of them in terms of only three basic clocks. This is further evidence in favor of the AM CVn nature of the system. [less ▲]

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See detailKepler observations of the beaming binary KPD 1946+4340
Bloemen, S.; Marsh, T. R.; Ostensen, R. H. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 410

The Kepler Mission has acquired 33.5 d of continuous 1-min photometry of KPD 1946+4340, a short-period binary system that consists of a subdwarf B star (sdB) and a white dwarf. In the light curve ... [more ▼]

The Kepler Mission has acquired 33.5 d of continuous 1-min photometry of KPD 1946+4340, a short-period binary system that consists of a subdwarf B star (sdB) and a white dwarf. In the light curve, eclipses are clearly seen, with the deepest occurring when the compact white dwarf crosses the disc of the sdB (0.4 per cent) and the more shallow ones (0.1 per cent) when the sdB eclipses the white dwarf. As expected, the sdB is deformed by the gravitational field of the white dwarf, which produces an ellipsoidal modulation of the light curve. Spectacularly, a very strong Doppler beaming (also known as Doppler boosting) effect is also clearly evident at the 0.1 per cent level. This originates from the sdB's orbital velocity, which we measure to be 164.0 ± 1.9 km s-1 from supporting spectroscopy. We present light-curve models that account for all these effects, as well as gravitational lensing, which decreases the apparent radius of the white dwarf by about 6 per cent, when it eclipses the sdB. We derive system parameters and uncertainties from the light curve using Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations. Adopting a theoretical white dwarf mass-radius relation, the mass of the subdwarf is found to be 0.47 ± 0.03 Msun and the mass of the white dwarf 0.59 ± 0.02 Msun. The effective temperature of the white dwarf is 15 900 ± 300 K. With a spectroscopic effective temperature of Teff= 34 730 ± 250 K and a surface gravity of log g= 5.43 ± 0.04, the subdwarf has most likely exhausted its core helium, and is in a shell He burning stage. The detection of Doppler beaming in Kepler light curves potentially allows one to measure radial velocities without the need of spectroscopic data. For the first time, a photometrically observed Doppler beaming amplitude is compared to a spectroscopically established value. The sdB's radial velocity amplitude derived from the photometry (168 ± 4 km s-1) is in perfect agreement with the spectroscopic value. After subtracting our best model for the orbital effects, we searched the residuals for stellar oscillations but did not find any significant pulsation frequencies. [less ▲]

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See detailNew advances in asteroseismology of pulsating hot subdwarf stars
Charpinet, S.; Van Grootel, Valérie ULg; Randall, S. K. et al

in Highlights of Astronomy (2010, November 01), 15

Hot subdwarf stars (of the sdB and sdO type) host three known classes of nonradial pulsators. Two of them feature short period (P ~ 60 - 600 s) accoustic mode oscillations, while the third group is ... [more ▼]

Hot subdwarf stars (of the sdB and sdO type) host three known classes of nonradial pulsators. Two of them feature short period (P ~ 60 - 600 s) accoustic mode oscillations, while the third group is characterized by slow g-mode deformations with periods of ~ 1 - 2h. These pulsations offer favorable grounds to infer some of the internal properties of these objects through asteroseismology. This has been exploited for the rapid p-mode sdB pulsators and the present contribution reviews some of the recent advances in this field. The long period g-mode pulsators, whose vibrations probe much deeper inside the star, are also of high interest. With the advent of space observations using CoRoT and KEPLER, the asteroseismology of these slower oscillators will also become a possibility, and likely contribute to significant breakthroughs in our understanding of these hot and compact stars. [less ▲]

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See detailMode identification from monochromatic amplitude and phase variations for the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star EC 20338-1925
Randall, S. K.; Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 522

We obtain time-series spectrophotometry observations at the VLT with the aim of partially identifying the dominant oscillation modes in the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star EC 20338-1925 on the basis of ... [more ▼]

We obtain time-series spectrophotometry observations at the VLT with the aim of partially identifying the dominant oscillation modes in the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B star EC 20338-1925 on the basis of monochromatic amplitude and phase variations. From the data gathered, we detect four previously known pulsations with periods near 147, 168, 126 and 140 s and amplitudes between 0.2 and 2.3 % of the star's mean brightness. We also determine the atmospheric parameters of EC 20338-1925 by fitting our non-LTE model atmospheres to an averaged combined spectrum. The inferred parameters are Teff = 34 153±94 K, log g = 5.966±0.017 and log N(He)/N(H) = -1.642±0.022, where the uncertainty estimates quoted refer to the formal fitting errors. Finally, we calculate the observed monochromatic amplitudes and phases for the periodicities extracted using least-squares fitting to the light curves obtained for each wavelength bin. These observed quantities are then compared to the corresponding theoretical values computed on the basis of dedicated model atmosphere codes and also taking into account non-adiabatic effects. We find that the quality of the data is sufficient to identify the dominant pulsation at 146.9 s as a radial mode, while two of the lower amplitude periodicities must be low-degree modes with ell = 0-2. This is the first time that monochromatic amplitudes and phases have been used for mode identification in a subdwarf B star, and the results are highly encouraging. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-dependent convection study of the driving mechanism in the DBV white dwarfs
Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Quirion, P. O.; Fontaine, G. et al

in Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2008), 118

We apply for the first time time-dependent convection (TDC) models to the study of the driving mechanism of the Pulsating DB (V777 Herculis) white dwarfs. From the blue to the red edge of the instability ... [more ▼]

We apply for the first time time-dependent convection (TDC) models to the study of the driving mechanism of the Pulsating DB (V777 Herculis) white dwarfs. From the blue to the red edge of the instability strip of these stars, TDC appears to play a central role in the driving. Around the blue edge, the convection adapts quasi-instantaneously to the oscillations, so that TDC must be included in the models. For the first time, we show that the red edge of the DB instability strip is successfully obtained with a TDC treatment, especially thanks to the terms due to the turbulent pressure variations, while it is not reproduced with frozen convection models. [less ▲]

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See detailHydrogen-Deficient Compact Pulsators: The GW Virginis Stars and the Variable DB White Dwarfs
Quirion, P*-O; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Fontaine, G. et al

in Hydrogen-Deficient Stars (2008, July 01)

We review briefly the basic properties of the GW Vir stars and of the V777 Her stars. We describe the classical kappa-mechanism operating in the GW Vir stars and the effects of the chemical composition ... [more ▼]

We review briefly the basic properties of the GW Vir stars and of the V777 Her stars. We describe the classical kappa-mechanism operating in the GW Vir stars and the effects of the chemical composition and of the interaction between diffusion and mass loss on the boundaries of the instability domain of these objects in the log g - T[SUB]eff[/SUB] diagram. Because of the presence of an extensive superficial convection zone in pulsating DB (V777 Her) white dwarfs, oscillation modes are not excited through a similar classical kappa-mechanism in those stars but, instead, involve pulsation-convection interactions. We describe the effects of a time-dependent convection (TDC) treatment on the driving mechanism of the V777 Her stars. We show how convection deeply affects the excitation of modes via the entropy transport mechanism or S-mechanism. Provisional blue and red edges are calculated for the V777 Her stars and are found at T[SUB]eff[/SUB] ~= 28,500 K and ~= 20,500 K, respectively, for a 0.6 M[SUB]o[/SUB] star under the assumption of ML2 convection. [less ▲]

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