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See detailThe position of Strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Brandi, M.L; Cannata-Andia, J. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving ... [more ▼]

Osteoporosis accounts for about 3 % of total European health-care spending. The low proportion of costs for the pharmacological prevention of osteoporotic fracture means that it is highly cost saving, especially in patient with severe osteoporosis or patients who cannot take certain osteoporosis medications due to issues of contraindications or tolerability. Following recent regulatory changes, strontium ranelate is now indicated in patients with severe osteoporosis for whom treatment with other osteoporosis treatments is not possible, and without contraindications including uncontrolled hypertension, established, current or past history of ischaemic heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and/or cerebrovascular disease. We review here today’s evidence for the safety and efficacy of strontium ranelate. The efficacy of strontium ranelate in patients complying with the new prescribing information (i.e. severe osteoporosis without contraindications) has been explored in a multivariate analysis of clinical trial data, which concluded that the antifracture efficacy of strontiumranelate is maintained in patients with severe osteoporosis without contraindications and also demonstrated how the new target population mitigates risk. Strontium ranelate is therefore an important alternative in today’s management of osteoporosis, with a positive benefit-risk balance, provided that the revised indication and contraindications are followed and cardiovascular risk is monitored. The bone community should be reassured that there remain viable alternatives in patients in whom treatment with other agents is not possible and protection against the debilitating effects of fracture is still feasible in patients with severe osteoporosis. [less ▲]

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See detailRecommendations for the registration of drugs to treat sarcopenia
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Cooper, C; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 62

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See detailCan we identify patients to be treated in osteoarthritis?
Arden, NK; Richette, P; Cooper, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 61-62

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See detailTrabecular bone score (TBS) as a new complementary appproach for osteoporosis evaluation in clinical practice
Harvey, NC; Binkley, N; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 60

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See detailThe position of Strontium ranelate in today's management of osteoporosis
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Brandi, ML; Cannata-Andia, J et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 39

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See detailDenosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for up to 9 years: results through year 6 of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Roux, C; Bone, HG et al

in Osteoporosis International (2015), 26(S1), 37-39

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See detailCan we identify patients with high risk of osteoarthritis progression who will respond to treatment ? A focus on epidemiology and phenotype of osteoarthritis
Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Cooper, C; Arden, N et al

in Drugs & Aging (2015), 32(3), 179-187

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis is a syndrome affecting a variety of patient profiles. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis and the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society working meeting explored the possibility of identifying different patient profiles in osteoarthritis. The risk factors for the development of osteoarthritis include systemic factors (e.g., age, sex, obesity, genetics, race, and bone density) and local biomechanical factors (e.g., obesity, sport, joint injury, and muscle weakness); most also predict disease progression, particularly joint injury, malalignment, and synovitis/effusion. The characterization of patient profiles should help to better orientate research, facilitate trial design, and define which patients are the most likely to benefit from treatment. There are a number of profile candidates. Generalized, polyarticular osteoarthritis and local, monoarticular osteoarthritis appear to be two different profiles; the former is a feature of osteoarthritis comorbid with inflammation or the metabolic syndrome, while the latter is more typical of post-trauma osteoarthritis, especially in cases with severe malalignment. Other biomechanical factors may also define profiles, such as joint malalignment, loss of meniscal function, and ligament injury. Early- and late-stage osteoarthritis appear as separate profiles, notably in terms of treatment response. Finally, there is evidence that there are two separate profiles related to lesions in the subchondral bone, which may determine benefit from bone-active treatments. Decisions on appropriate therapy should be made considering clinical presentation, underlying pathophysiology, and stage of disease. Identification of patient profiles may lead to more personalized healthcare, with more targeted treatment for osteoarthritis. [less ▲]

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See detailErratum to: Management of osteoporosis of the oldest old
Rizzoli, R; Branco, J; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25

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See detailThe role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women : A consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Rizzoli, R; Stevenson, JC; Bauer, JM et al

in Maturitas (2014), 79

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of ... [more ▼]

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0–1.2 g/kg body weight/d with at least 20–25 g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800 IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000 mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3–5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health. [less ▲]

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See detailEight years of denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the first five years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Lippuner, K; Roux, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(2), 46-47

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See detailComment on Freemantle et al. : Results of indirect and mixed treatment comparison of fracture efficacy for osteoporosis treatements
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(6), 1929-30

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See detailNutrition and bone health : turning beliefs into knowledge for healthy behaviour
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 388-389

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See detailTreatment of osteoporosis in men.
Kaufman, JM; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boonen, S et al

in BONE (2013), 53(1), 134-44

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline) are discussed. INTRODUCTION: Awareness of osteoporosis in men is improving, although it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) workshop was convened to discuss osteoporosis in men and to provide a report by a panel of experts (the authors). METHODS: A debate with an expert panel on preselected topics was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although additional fracture data are needed to endorse the clinical care of osteoporosis in men, consensus views were reached on diagnostic criteria and intervention thresholds. Empirical data in men display similarities with data acquired in women, despite pathophysiological differences, which may not be clinically relevant. Men should receive treatment at a similar 10-year fracture probability as in women. The design of mixed studies may reduce the lag between comparable treatments for osteoporosis in women becoming available in men. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of a strontium ranelate 2 G/vitamin D3 1000 UI combination on the correction of vitamin D insufficiency
Rizzoli, R; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kaufman, JM et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, May), 23(S2), 225

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See detailDenosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 6 years : results from the first 3 years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP; Chapurlat, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 76

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See detailGuidance for the prevention of bone loss and fractures in postmenopausal women treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer : an ESCEO position paper
Rizzoli, R; Body, JJ; De Censi, A et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

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See detailCorrection of vitamin D insufficiency with the fixed daily combination strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU over 12 months
Rizzoli, R; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kaufman, JM et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 835

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See detailAntidepressant medications and osteoporosis
Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in BONE (2012), 51

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