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See detailThe role of dietary protein and vitamin D in maintaining musculoskeletal health in postmenopausal women : A consensus statement from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO)
Rizzoli, R; Stevenson, JC; Bauer, JM et al

in Maturitas (2014), 79

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of ... [more ▼]

From 50 years of age, postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis as a result of deterioration of musculoskeletal health. Both disorders increase the risk of falls and fractures. The risk of developing sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be attenuated through healthy lifestyle changes, which include adequate dietary protein, calcium and vitamin D intakes, and regular physical activity/exercise, besides hormone replacement therapy when appropriate. Protein intake and physical activity are the main anabolic stimuli for muscle protein synthesis. Exercise training leads to increased muscle mass and strength, and the combination of optimal protein intake and exercise produces a greater degree of muscle protein accretion than either intervention alone. Similarly, adequate dietary protein intake and resistance exercise are important contributors to the maintenance of bone strength. Vitamin D helps to maintain muscle mass and strength as well as bone health. These findings suggest that healthy lifestyle measures in women aged >50 years are essential to allow healthy ageing. The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) recommends optimal dietary protein intake of 1.0–1.2 g/kg body weight/d with at least 20–25 g of high-quality protein at each main meal, with adequate vitamin D intake at 800 IU/d to maintain serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels >50 nmol/L as well as calcium intake of 1000 mg/d, alongside regular physical activity/exercise 3–5 times/week combined with protein intake in close proximity to exercise, in postmenopausal women for prevention of age-related deterioration of musculoskeletal health. [less ▲]

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See detailEight years of denosumab treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: results from the first five years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Lippuner, K; Roux, C et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25(2), 46-47

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See detailComment on Freemantle et al. : Results of indirect and mixed treatment comparison of fracture efficacy for osteoporosis treatements
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Rizzoli, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(6), 1929-30

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See detailNutrition and bone health : turning beliefs into knowledge for healthy behaviour
Brandi, ML; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 388-389

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See detailTreatment of osteoporosis in men.
Kaufman, JM; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boonen, S et al

in BONE (2013), 53(1), 134-44

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline) are discussed. INTRODUCTION: Awareness of osteoporosis in men is improving, although it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) workshop was convened to discuss osteoporosis in men and to provide a report by a panel of experts (the authors). METHODS: A debate with an expert panel on preselected topics was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although additional fracture data are needed to endorse the clinical care of osteoporosis in men, consensus views were reached on diagnostic criteria and intervention thresholds. Empirical data in men display similarities with data acquired in women, despite pathophysiological differences, which may not be clinically relevant. Men should receive treatment at a similar 10-year fracture probability as in women. The design of mixed studies may reduce the lag between comparable treatments for osteoporosis in women becoming available in men. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of a strontium ranelate 2 G/vitamin D3 1000 UI combination on the correction of vitamin D insufficiency
Rizzoli, R; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kaufman, JM et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, May), 23(S2), 225

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See detailDenosumab treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for 6 years : results from the first 3 years of the freedom extension
Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP; Chapurlat, R et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 76

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See detailGuidance for the prevention of bone loss and fractures in postmenopausal women treated with aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer : an ESCEO position paper
Rizzoli, R; Body, JJ; De Censi, A et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

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See detailCorrection of vitamin D insufficiency with the fixed daily combination strontium ranelate 2 g/vitamin D3 1000 IU over 12 months
Rizzoli, R; Dawson-Hughes, B; Kaufman, JM et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2012), 64(S10), 835

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See detailAntidepressant medications and osteoporosis
Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in BONE (2012), 51

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See detailTreatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis for six years with denosumab : three-year results from the freedom extension
Chapurlat, R; Papapoulos, S; Brown, JP et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2012), 71(3), 588

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See detailMaintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate in postmenopausal osteoporosis.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J. M.; Goemaere, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and ... [more ▼]

In an open-label extension study, BMD increased continuously with strontium ranelate over 10 years in osteoporotic women (P < 0.01). Vertebral and nonvertebral fracture incidence was lower between 5 and 10 years than in a matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05). Strontium ranelate's antifracture efficacy appears to be maintained long term. INTRODUCTION: Strontium ranelate has proven efficacy against vertebral and nonvertebral fractures, including hip, over 5 years in postmenopausal osteoporosis. We explored long-term efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate over 10 years. METHODS: Postmenopausal osteoporotic women participating in the double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 studies SOTI and TROPOS to 5 years were invited to enter a 5-year open-label extension, during which they received strontium ranelate 2 g/day (n = 237, 10-year population). Bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture incidence were recorded, and FRAX(R) scores were calculated. The effect of strontium ranelate on fracture incidence was evaluated by comparison with a FRAX(R)-matched placebo group identified in the TROPOS placebo arm. RESULTS: The patients in the 10-year population had baseline characteristics comparable to those of the total SOTI/TROPOS population. Over 10 years, lumbar BMD increased continuously and significantly (P < 0.01 versus previous year) with 34.5 +/- 20.2% relative change from baseline to 10 years. The incidence of vertebral and nonvertebral fracture with strontium ranelate in the 10-year population in years 6 to 10 was comparable to the incidence between years 0 and 5, but was significantly lower than the incidence observed in the FRAX(R)-matched placebo group over 5 years (P < 0.05); relative risk reductions for vertebral and nonvertebral fractures were 35% and 38%, respectively. Strontium ranelate was safe and well tolerated over 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term treatment with strontium ranelate is associated with sustained increases in BMD over 10 years, with a good safety profile. Our results also support the maintenance of antifracture efficacy over 10 years with strontium ranelate. [less ▲]

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See detailDenosumab therapy in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis : results from the first two years of the freedom trial extension
Bone, H. G.; Chapurlat, R.; Brandi, M. L. et al

in Endocrine Reviews (2011), 32

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See detailSafety observations from denosumab long-term extension and cross-over studies in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis
Bone, H. G.; Chapurlat, R.; Libanati, C. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011), 26(S1), 22-23

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See detailExtended safety observations from denosumab administration in postmenopausal women from FREEDOM and FREEDOM extension trials
Brown, J. P.; Bone, H. G.; Chapurlat, R. et al

in Arthritis and Rheumatism (2011), 63(S10), 431-432

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See detailTreatment of osteoporosis: recognizing and managing cutaneous adverse reactions and drug-induced hypersensitivity.
Musette, P.; Brandi, M. L.; Cacoub, P. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many treatments including antiosteoporotic agents. This position paper includes an algorithm for their recognition. With early recognition and proper ... [more ▼]

Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many treatments including antiosteoporotic agents. This position paper includes an algorithm for their recognition. With early recognition and proper management, including immediate and permanent withdrawal of the culprit agent, accompanied by hospitalization, rehydration, and systemic corticosteroids, if necessary, the prognosis is good. INTRODUCTION: Cutaneous adverse reactions are reported for many therapeutic agents and observed in between 0% and 8% of treated patients depending on the drug. The antiosteoporotic agents are reputed to be safe in terms of cutaneous effects; however, there have been a number of case reports of cutaneous adverse reactions, which merit consideration. This was the subject of a Working Group meeting of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis in April 2009, to focus on the impact of cutaneous adverse reactions and drug-induced hypersensitivity in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We prepared this position paper following these discussions, and include an algorithm for their recognition. METHODS: We reviewed cutaneous adverse reactions observed with antiosteoporotic agents, including information from case reports, regulatory documents, and pharmacovigilance. RESULTS: The cutaneous adverse reactions range from benign reactions including exanthematous or maculopapular eruption (drug rash), photosensitivity, and urticaria to the severe and potentially life-threatening reactions, angioedema, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Review of available evidence shows that cutaneous adverse reactions occur with all commonly used antiosteoporotic agents. Notably, there are reports of SJS and TEN for bisphosphonates, and of DRESS and TEN for strontium ranelate. These severe reactions remain very rare (<1 in 10,000 cases). CONCLUSION: With early recognition and proper management, including immediate and permanent withdrawal of the culprit agent, accompanied by hospitalization and rehydration and systemic corticosteroids if necessary, the prognosis is good. [less ▲]

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See detailStrontium ranelate decreases the risk of hip fracture over 3 and 5 years in post menopausal women at high risk
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, D.; Boonen, Steven et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2008, June), 67(Suppl.II), 540

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See detailStrontium ranelate demonstrates efficacy against hip fracture over 3 and 5 years in postmenopausal women at high risk of hip fracture
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Felsenberg, D.; Boonen, Steven et al

in Osteoporosis International (2008, April), 19(Suppl.1), 26-27

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