References of "Bragard, Isabelle"
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See detailComparaison de l'impact de deux méthodes d'apprentissage sur la sécurité d'administration des médicaments : stages cliniques versus simulation
Servotte, Jean-Christophe ULg; Galerin, Catherine ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg et al

Conference (2017, September 12)

Introduction Drug administration is the act nurses most frequently do. However, 50% of errors occur during administration. The damage these errors causes to patients, results in excess mortality rates and ... [more ▼]

Introduction Drug administration is the act nurses most frequently do. However, 50% of errors occur during administration. The damage these errors causes to patients, results in excess mortality rates and health care costs, hence leading to a major public health problem. Therefore, it is advisable to consider the training of future nurses on the practice of this delicate act. The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of teaching by simulation combined with the internship on the safety administration of intravenous drugs by nursing students, compared to just the internship alone. Material and method A selection of 99 students from the bachelors’ block two of the Namur-Liege-Luxembourg Higher Institute of Nursing met the inclusion criteria under consideration. They were divided into two groups, one experimental group which participated in a simulation session and a control group, the latter did not participate in the simulation session. At the start of the research, all students were assessed by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with the theme of modifying infusion and syringe flow rates. They were also asked to complete a questionnaire concerning their knowledge and self-efficacy feeling related to drug administration. The experimental group then participated in the simulation sessions. The experimental group and the control group also went into four weeks of training in medical or surgical services before participating in the second stage of the study. The latter consisted of the same tests and questionnaires as stage one of the study. The evolution of the results of the two groups was first observed separately before being compared. Results The majority of the results shows that the simulation improves, in a way significantly more important than the clinical course, the acquisition of skills and knowledge, as well as the feeling of self-efficacy in drug administration. On the other hand, the assessment of the level of stress linked to drug administration and the professional attitude evaluated during the OSCE were not significantly more improved by the simulation than by the training alone (stress: p-value = 0.8269, professional attitude = 0.9857). Conclusions For the students in the experimental group, the simulation showed a positive impact on the skills, knowledge and feeling of self-efficacy associated with drug administration. Changes and continuation of the study would make it possible to go further in the generalization of results, in the evaluation of learning outcomes, and to attest to their sustainability. [less ▲]

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See detailHi-Fi simulation and teamwork training: what is it good for?
CARDOS, Benoît ULg; GILLET, Aline ULg; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULg et al

Poster (2017, June 15)

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See detailEvaluation of the implementation of integrated care for people with chronic conditions
Van Durme, Thérèse; Anthierens, Sibyl; Van Hecke, Ann et al

Conference (2017, May)

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See detailBreaking Bad News: the TAKE five program
VAN CAUWENBERGE, Isabelle ULg; GILLET, Aline ULg; Bragard, Isabelle ULg et al

Conference (2017, January 14)

Introduction For years, bad news delivery’s impact on patients or their relatives, as well as physicians’ stress has been a major concern. Based on studies claiming the efficacy of training courses to ... [more ▼]

Introduction For years, bad news delivery’s impact on patients or their relatives, as well as physicians’ stress has been a major concern. Based on studies claiming the efficacy of training courses to help physicians delivering such news, many protocols, like SPIKES, BREAKS or SHARE, have emerged worldwide. However, training to such protocol might be time-consuming and not suitable with junior doctors or trainees’ turnover. We hypothesised that a standardized 5-hours training program could improve bad news delivery practice. Participants and methods This preliminary study was conducted in the ED of a tertiary care academic hospital accounting for 90000 ED census per year, 16 attending physicians, 10 junior residents, and 5 trainees per month. Data were collected between November 2015 and April 2016. The study included 3 phases over 4 weeks. Video recorded single role-playing sessions happened the 1st (T1) and the 4th (T3) weeks. A 3-hour theory lesson happened the second week (T2), introducing the basics of therapeutic communication and delivering bad news. Each role-playing session lasted almost 1 hour (10 minutes briefing and medical case reading, 10 minutes role-plays and 40 minutes group debriefing). Bad news delivery performance was evaluated by a 14-points retrospective assessment tool (1). We collected data about the status and impact of a stressful event at 3-days using the French version of the IES-R scale (2). We applied Student t-tests for statistical analysis. Results 14 volunteers (10 trainees and 4 junior emergency physicians) were included in the study. On average, bad-news delivery process took 9’45’’ at T1 and 10’20’’ at T3. From T1 to T3, bad-news delivery performance increased significantly for both junior emergency physicians and trainees (p=0.0003 and p=0.0006, respectively). Further analysis revealed that most relevant increases involved the “situation” (p<0.001), “presentation” (p=0.009), “knowledge” (p=0.037), “emotions” (p=0.01) and “summary” (p=0.001) steps. We also found a significant decrease of the impact of bad-news delivery on trainee physicians’ stress (p=0.006). Discussion and conclusion These preliminary results indicate some potential for this new standardized course of bad news delivery. Apart from allowing physicians increase their communications skills, we believe that this simple 5-hour simulation-training program could alleviate physicians’ stress when they happen to break bad news. References 1. Brunet, A. et al. (2003). Validation of a French version of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised. Can J Psychiatry, 48(1), 56-61. 2. Park, I. et al. (2010). Breaking bad news education for emergency medicine residents: A novel training module using simulation with the SPIKES protocol. J Emerg Trauma Shock, 3(4), 385-388. [less ▲]

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See detailApprentissage d'auto-hypnose/self-care en oncologie. Pour qui? Comment? Pour quel intérêt?
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULg; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULg et al

in Psycho-Oncologie (2017), 11

Les symptômes physiques les plus fréquemment liés au cancer et à ses traitements sont la douleur, les nausées et la fatigue. Ils peuvent influencer négativement la qualité de vie. Les interventions de ... [more ▼]

Les symptômes physiques les plus fréquemment liés au cancer et à ses traitements sont la douleur, les nausées et la fatigue. Ils peuvent influencer négativement la qualité de vie. Les interventions de groupe visant l’apprentissage de l’autohypnose, associé ou non à l’autobienveillance, ont démontré l’amélioration de l’adaptation des patients oncologiques. Le but de cette revue est de relever l’efficacité de l’hypnose dans la gestion des symptômes liés à la maladie et de mieux comprendre les mécanismes de la technique. [less ▲]

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See detailLa «Health Literacy»,un moyen pour réduire les inégalités sociales de santé
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; COUCKE, Philippe ULg; Pétré, Benoît ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2017), 72(1),

Health literacy (HL) is defined as ‘the knowledge, motivation, and competences to access, understand, appraise and apply health information in order to make judgments and take decisions in everyday life ... [more ▼]

Health literacy (HL) is defined as ‘the knowledge, motivation, and competences to access, understand, appraise and apply health information in order to make judgments and take decisions in everyday life concerning health care, disease prevention and health promotion to maintain or improve quality of life’. This concept begins to be recognized as a priority area for action at political level in Belgium. Indeed, a limited HL may affect health by leading, by example, with poorer management of chronic diseases, more hospital admissions and premature deaths. This paper addresses the question of HL evaluation, improvement interventions as well as the many challenges that remain in this area. HL seems fundamental to the development of better health management. It would allow patients to play a more active role in health care, to involve all health stakeholders, and to contribute to a more sustainable health system. Improving HL could allow better equal access to health care. [less ▲]

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See detailHealth literacy en Belgique : diagnostic et pistes d’interventions
Bragard, Isabelle ULg; Pétré, Benoît ULg; Coucke, Philippe ULg et al

Conference (2016, December 14)

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See detailGestion du stress professionnel : sensibilisation aux processus psychologiques et outils de gestion dérivés
Brouette, Béatrice ULg; Stassart, Céline ULg; Dethier, Marie ULg et al

in Etienne, Anne-Marie; Bragard, Isabelle (Eds.) Evolutions sociales, Innovations et Politiques: nouvelles questions et nouveaux enjeux pour la psychologie de la santé. (2016, October)

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See detailHealth Literacy: Eduquer pour mieux soigner
Bragard, Isabelle ULg

Scientific conference (2016, June 24)

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