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See detailAn essential role for gamma-herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog in an acute lymphoproliferative disease of cattle.
Palmeira, Leonor; Sorel, Océane ULg; Van Campe, Willem et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a gamma-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal ... [more ▼]

Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a gamma-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). This acute and lethal lymphoproliferative disease occurs after a prolonged asymptomatic incubation period after transmission. Our recent findings with the rabbit model indicated that AlHV-1 infection is not productive during MCF. Here, we investigated whether latency establishment could explain this apparent absence of productive infection and sought to determine its role in MCF pathogenesis. First, whole-genome cellular and viral gene expression analyses were performed in lymph nodes of MCF-developing calves. Whereas a severe disruption in cellular genes was observed, only 10% of the entire AlHV-1 genome was expressed, contrasting with the 45% observed during productive infection in vitro. In vivo, the expressed viral genes included the latency-associated nuclear antigen homolog ORF73 but none of the regions known to be essential for productive infection. Next, genomic conformation analyses revealed that AlHV-1 was essentially episomal, further suggesting that MCF might be the consequence of a latent infection rather than abortive lytic infection. This hypothesis was further supported by the high frequencies of infected CD8+ T cells during MCF using immunodetection of ORF73 protein and single-cell RT-PCR approaches. Finally, the role of latency-associated ORF73 was addressed. A lack of ORF73 did not impair initial virus replication in vivo, but it rendered AlHV-1 unable to induce MCF and persist in vivo and conferred protection against a lethal challenge with a WT virus. Together, these findings suggest that a latent infection is essential for MCF induction. [less ▲]

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See detailMalignant catarrhal fever induced by alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 is associated with proliferation of CD8+ T cells supporting a latent infection.
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Boudry, Christel ULg; Farnir, Frédéric ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2008), 3(2), 1627

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest asymptomatically, causes malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla ... [more ▼]

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried by wildebeest asymptomatically, causes malignant catarrhal fever (WD-MCF) when cross-species transmitted to a variety of susceptible species of the Artiodactyla order. Experimentally, WD-MCF can be induced in rabbits. The lesions observed are very similar to those described in natural host species. Here, we used the rabbit model and in vivo 5-Bromo-29-Deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation to study WD-MCF pathogenesis. The results obtained can be summarized as follows. (i) AlHV-1 infection induces CD8+ T cell proliferation detectable as early as 15 days postinoculation. (ii) While the viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains below the detection level during most of the incubation period, it increases drastically few days before death. At that time, at least 10% of CD8+ cells carry the viral genome; while CD11b+, IgM+ and CD4+ cells do not. (iii) RT-PCR analyses of mononuclear cells isolated from the spleen and the popliteal lymph node of infected rabbits revealed no expression of ORF25 and ORF9, low or no expression of ORF50, and high or no expression of ORF73. Based on these data, we propose a new model for the pathogenesis of WD-MCF. This model relies on proliferation of infected CD8+ cells supporting a predominantly latent infection. [less ▲]

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See detailThe A5 gene of alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 encodes a constitutively active G-protei n-coupled receptor that is non-essential for the induction of malignant catarrhal fever in rabbits
Boudry, Christel ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas ULg; Delforge, Cédric ULg et al

in Journal of General Virology (2007), 88(Pt 12), 3224-3233

Many gammaherpesviruses encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several in vivo studies have revealed that gammaherpesvirus GPCRs are important for viral replication and for virus-induced pathogenesis ... [more ▼]

Many gammaherpesviruses encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several in vivo studies have revealed that gammaherpesvirus GPCRs are important for viral replication and for virus-induced pathogenesis. The gammaherpesvirus alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) is carried asymptomatically by wildebeest, but causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) following cross-species transmission to a variety of susceptible species. The A5 ORF of the AlHV-1 genome encodes a putative GPCR. In the present study, we investigated whether A5 encodes a functional GPCR and addressed its role in viral replication and in the pathogenesis of MCF. In silico analysis supported the hypothesis that A5 could encode a functional GPCR as its expression product contained several hallmark features of GPCRs. Expression of A5 as tagged proteins in various cell lines revealed that A5 localizes in cell membranes, including the plasma membrane. Using [35S]GTPgammaS and reporter gene assays, we found that A5 is able to constitutively couple to alpha i-type G-proteins in transfected cells, and that this interaction is able to inhibit forskolin-triggered cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation. Finally, using an AlHV-1 BAC clone, we produced a strain deleted for A5 and a revertant strain. Interestingly, the strain deleted for A5 replicated comparably to the wild-type parental strain and induced MCF in rabbits that was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain. The present study is the first to investigate the role of an individual gene of AlHV-1 in MCF pathogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailCloning of the genome of Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 as an infectious and pathogenic bacterial artificial chromosome.
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Boudry, Christel ULg; Gillet, Laurent ULg et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (2006), 87(Pt 3), 509-17

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried asymptomatically by wildebeest, causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) following cross-species transmission to a variety of susceptible species of the order ... [more ▼]

Alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), carried asymptomatically by wildebeest, causes malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) following cross-species transmission to a variety of susceptible species of the order Artiodactyla. The study of MCF pathogenesis has been impeded by an inability to produce recombinant virus, mainly due to the fact that AlHV-1 becomes attenuated during passage in culture. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by cloning the entire AlHV-1 genome as a stable, infectious and pathogenic bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). A modified loxP-flanked BAC cassette was inserted in one of the two large non-coding regions of the AlHV-1 genome. This insertion allowed the production of an AlHV-1 BAC clone stably maintained in bacteria and able to regenerate virions when transfected into permissive cells. The loxP-flanked BAC cassette was excised from the genome of reconstituted virions by growing them in permissive cells stably expressing Cre recombinase. Importantly, BAC-derived AlHV-1 virions replicated comparably to the virulent (low-passage) AlHV-1 parental strain and induced MCF in rabbits that was indistinguishable from that of the virulent parental strain. The availability of the AlHV-1 BAC is an important advance for the study of MCF that will allow the identification of viral genes involved in MCF pathogenesis, as well as the production of attenuated recombinant candidate vaccines. [less ▲]

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See detailL'herpèsvirus alcélaphin 1, l'agent responsable de la forme africaine du coryza gangreneux
Dewals, Benjamin G ULg; Boudry, Christel ULg; Markine-Goriaynoff, Nicolas ULg et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2003), 147(1, FEB-MAR), 1-15

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a pathology usually lethal which has been described in a large number of ruminant species. Based on the etiology, two main forms of MCF have been described, i.e., the ... [more ▼]

Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a pathology usually lethal which has been described in a large number of ruminant species. Based on the etiology, two main forms of MCF have been described, i.e., the European and the African forms due to ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) and alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), respectively. The present review is devoted to the African form of MCF and to its causative agent AlHV-1. AlHV-1 belongs to the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily of the Herpesviridae family. Wildebeests (Connochaetes spp) carry AlHV-1, which is lethal for a large number of ruminant species, while apparently harmless to its natural host. In hosts susceptible to MCF, the pathology is characterized by fever, extensive lymphadenopathy, ulcerative lesions of the digestive and the upper respiratory tracts mucous membranes and severe keratoconjunctivitis. In the present paper, we will review the data available to date on AlHV-1 and on the African form of MCF with emphasis on the pathogenesis, clinical signs and anatomo-pathological lesions of MCF. Finally, we will discuss the relationship between AlHV-1 and wildebeest as an example of symbiosis between a virus and its natural host. [less ▲]

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