References of "Bosly, A"
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See detailPrimary immune thrombocytopenia in adults
Janssens, A.; Lambert, C.; Bries, G. et al

in Belgian Journal of Hematology (2013), 4(1), 2-11

The Belgian Hematological Society (BHS) guideline panel on adult primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) reviewed the recent literature on diagnosis and treatment to make recommendations on the best ... [more ▼]

The Belgian Hematological Society (BHS) guideline panel on adult primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) reviewed the recent literature on diagnosis and treatment to make recommendations on the best strategies for frontline and subsequent-line treatment. No treatment is necessary for patients with platelet counts higher than 30000/ l in the absence of bleeding symptoms. Patients newly diagnosed or relapsing after a long-term treatment-free period can be managed with corticosteroids with or without intravenous immunoglobulins. A second line therapy is indicated for those patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to or relapse after initial corticosteroid treatment and have a risk of bleeding. The guideline panel recommends splenectomy as it is the treatment with the highest curative potential and an acceptable safety pro le. If possible, splenectomy should be delayed to at least twelve months after diagnosis as spontaneous remission can occur in this time period. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonists are recommended for patients who are refractory to or relapse after splenectomy or who have a contra-indication to splenectomy irrespective of the duration of ITP. The guideline panel agrees that rituximab, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine A, danazol, dapsone, mycophenolate mofetil and vincristine/vinblastine are potential treatment options, especially for patients refractory to TPO-R agonists. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh prevalence of anaemia and limited use of therapy in cancer patients : a Belgian survey (Anaemia Day 2008)
Verbeke, N.; Beguin, Yves ULg; Wildiers, H. et al

in Supportive Care in Cancer (2012), 20

Objectives: The aim of this study is to provide relevant and accurate information on prevalence and treatment patterns of anaemia in Belgian cancer patients. Methods The Anaemia Day 2008 survey was a ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study is to provide relevant and accurate information on prevalence and treatment patterns of anaemia in Belgian cancer patients. Methods The Anaemia Day 2008 survey was a single visit, multi-centre, non-interventional study in adult cancer patients under systemic therapy (chemotherapy, hormonal, immunological and/or targeted therapy) and/or radiotherapy. Efforts were made to enrol the maximum number of patients seen in each centre that day. Patients signed an informed consent and relevant data were collected from their files, i.e. disease and disease stage, cancer therapy and anti-anaemic treatment, including transfusions and the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA). A blood count of each included patient was performed. Haemoglobin (Hb) values (grams per decilitre) were classified into four categories to assess the severity of anaemia, as defined byWHO: no anaemia: Hb≥12 g/dL; mild 10≤Hb≤11.9 g/dL; moderate 8≤Hb≤9.9 g/dL; severe Hb< 8 g/dL. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out with anaemia as the dependent variable. Results A total of 1,403 eligible patients aged 63±13 years (mean age±SD) were enrolled in 106 oncology or haematology centres. The mean Hb level (±SD) was 11.6 g/dL (±1.8 g/dL) and the prevalence of anaemia (Hb<12 g/dL) was 55.7% (95% CI, 53.1–58.3%), respectively, 35.9% mild, 17.8% moderate and 2.1% severe anaemia. Anaemia was more frequent in females than in males, and in patients with haematological malignancies (73.4%) than in those with solid tumours (51.4%; p<0.001). Anaemia prevalence was higher in hospitalised patients (75.5%) compared to those seen in one-day-clinic (54.3%) or in consultation (33.9%; p<0.001), and in patients treated with chemotherapy (61.3%) compared to those receiving radiotherapy (34.4%) or hormonal therapy (19.5%; p<0.001). There was a clear correlation between severity of anaemia and WHO performance status (p< 0.001). Among anaemic patients, 53.1% received no treatment (mean Hb 10.8±0.9 g/dL). Among the anaemic patients who received therapy for their anaemia (mean Hb 9.7±1.1 g/dL), the most frequent treatments were RBC transfusions (42%), ESA (34.6%), transfusions+ESA (12%), ESA+iron (7.9%) and iron alone (3.5%). Comparison to the ECAS survey shows that there has been no major change in attitude towards anaemia management in the last decade. Conclusion This survey shows that cancer-related anaemia is still frequently observed in cancer patients. Even if in our study ESA were used more frequently than about 10 years ago, still a large amount of anaemic patients who could be treated for anaemia according to EORTC guidelines, were not. [less ▲]

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See detailA quantitative study of peripheral blood stem cell contamination in diffuse large-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: one-half of patients significantly mobilize malignant cells.
Jacquy, C.; Soree, A.; Lambert, Frédéric ULg et al

in British Journal of Haematology (2000), 110(3), 631-7

Autologous transplantation using peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) collected after chemotherapy, followed by growth factor administration (ASCT), is increasingly used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's ... [more ▼]

Autologous transplantation using peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) collected after chemotherapy, followed by growth factor administration (ASCT), is increasingly used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, quantitative data regarding contaminating malignant cells in the harvests are still scarce. We prospectively investigated 37 diffuse large-cell lymphomas (DLCLs) in complete remission (CR) that were treated according to multicentric protocols at our centre. DNA was extracted from the diagnostic lymph node. The complementarity-determining region (CDR) III was sequenced and a patient-specific oligomer synthesized. Contamination was evaluated semiquantitatively by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and was confirmed by a limiting dilution analysis. PBSCs collected at regeneration after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), steady-state bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood samples at CR were compared. DNA was available in 37 patients, from which 22 rearrangements could be sequenced. Patients (n = 15) who had both the required follow-up samples and a suitable clonal marker were investigated. In two cases, the patient-specific PCR assay set up at diagnosis later gave false-negative results in samples in which clonal DNA was still detectable by other sets of primers. PBSC contamination was highly variable: 7 out of 15 patients showed a PBSC/BM ratio of NHL cells greater than 1 log, whereas 8 out of 15 patients showed no difference and could vary from one apheresis to another. Eight ASCTs were performed, five of which used highly contaminated PBSCs: four patients relapsed early, three with disseminated lymphoma. Thus, 50% of DLCLs in CR seem to mobilize significantly malignant cells at regeneration under G-CSF. Considering the higher numbers of cells reinfused, this translates into a much higher number of lymphoma cells reinfused when compared with autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). However, their clonogenic potential remains unknown and, despite concerning observations in certain cases, it is still unclear whether this has an impact upon the outcome of ASCT. [less ▲]

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See detailPeripheral blood stem cell contamination in mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: the case for purging?
Jacquy, Caroline; Lambert, Frédéric ULg; Soree, A. et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (1999), 23(7), 681-6

Intensification using peripheral blood stem cells collected after chemotherapy followed by growth factors is being increasingly investigated as an alternative to conventional chemotherapy for mantle cell ... [more ▼]

Intensification using peripheral blood stem cells collected after chemotherapy followed by growth factors is being increasingly investigated as an alternative to conventional chemotherapy for mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We investigated 14 grades III-IV, t(11;14)-positive cases for contamination of PBSC collected after a polychemotherapy regimen followed by G-CSF. Patients were first treated with a polychemotherapy regimen. There were four CR, seven PR, two refractory and one early death. Seven patients have been transplanted, in whom PBSC were mobilized, using either cyclophosphamide/VP16 or Dexa-BEAM followed by G-CSF. For all patients, whether actually autografted or not, PB cells were tested at the time of regeneration on G-CSF after the first polychemotherapy or after the mobilizing regimen. PCR evaluation of contamination was performed first by a semi-quantitative approach, using serial dilutions of initial DNA, then confirmed using a limiting-dilution analysis. Two patients were not informative (one early death and one without an available molecular marker). PB cells collected at regeneration contained at least one log more lymphoma cells than steady-state blood or marrow, apart from in two cases. Moreover, where a mobilizing treatment diminished tumor burden in the patient, at the same time it increased PB contamination in most cases. We conclude that advanced mantle cell NHL appears to be largely resistant to significant in vivo purging by conventional chemotherapy. Where treatment brings benefits by reducing tumor load, it may at the same time negate it by mobilizing malignant cells into the collections used to intensify. Although the clonogenic potential of this massive infiltration is unknown (only gene marking studies could provide a definitive answer regarding the source of relapses), strategies aimed at reducing the level of contamination in the graft should be considered when designing future protocols. [less ▲]

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