References of "Boseret, Géraldine"
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See detailZoonoses in Pet 1 birds: review and perspectives
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

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See detailZoonotic diseases in pet birds – a short review
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg

Poster (2012, May 11)

The term « Pet bird » designates birds housed and breeded for an exclusively ornamental use. This category includes mainly Passeriformes (canaries, finches…) and Psittaciformes (parrots, parakeets…), and ... [more ▼]

The term « Pet bird » designates birds housed and breeded for an exclusively ornamental use. This category includes mainly Passeriformes (canaries, finches…) and Psittaciformes (parrots, parakeets…), and is a not-so-well known vet’s clientship fraction. Many families indeed own their « kitchen canary », which represent a lucrative business for pet shops or local breeders (e.a. via birds fairs and markets). Besides, some birds are bred for their very high value; for example, in the case of canaries, male and female reproductors with recognized genetic potential are presented in international contests for their posture (the Bossu Belge : fig 1a), their colour (red mosaic: fig 1b) and for their song (Harzer: fig 1c) and sold for rising prices. Finally, exotic birds like parrots (ara, cockatoo…), legally or illegaly traded from Asia, are however very popular pets and profusely represented in zoos and parks. Notwithstanding these economic facts, these animals are potential carriers and/or transmitters of zoonotic diseases. Some of them could have an important impact on human health, like ornithosis, salmonellosis or even H5N1 high pathogenic avian influenza. This review, although non exhausive, has as aim to enlighten, by the description of several cases of birds-humans transmission the risks encountered by birds owners, including children, and on another point of view to assess the potential economic consequences. [less ▲]

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See detailWATER-BORNE EMERGING ZOONOSE? CASE REPORT ON ERYSIPELAS (ERYSIPELOTHRIX RHUSIOPATHIAE) IN HARBOUR PORPOISES (PHOCOENA PHOCOENA) AND HARBOUR SEAL (PHOCA VITULINA).
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

Poster (2012, March 26)

An adult female harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and a juvenile male harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) have been found stranded dead on the Belgian coast in late 2001. As the two bodies were in good ... [more ▼]

An adult female harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) and a juvenile male harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) have been found stranded dead on the Belgian coast in late 2001. As the two bodies were in good condition (CC = 2), necropsy and bacteriological analyses were performed as well as other postmortem investigations. Blood heart and organs (liver, digestive and respiratory tract, lungs, spleen, brain, kidneys) samples have been collected and analyzed. The porpoise showed evidence of septicaemia, and the seal presented lesions of acute enteritis. Pure and abundant growth of a small rod-shaped, Gram-labile bacterium was obtained aerobically and anaerobically on Columbia blood agar from heart blood, mouth, pharynx, lungs, intestine and anus of the porpoise, and from intestine, pharynx, mouth, nose and anus of the seal. The colonies were surrounded by a narrow zone of alpha-hemolysis. Catalase- and peroxydase-tests gave negative results. Rapid ID 32 Strepto (Biomérieux, France) sugar tests identified this isolate as Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. E. rhusiopathiae could be therefore considered as the cause of septicaemia on the porpoise as it was present in heart blood and internal organs, and could be associated primary or secondary with the enteritis reported on the seal as the bacterium was isolated in pure culture in the digestive tract. E. rhusiopathiae infections have been reported in captive dolphins and sea lions. This zoonotic pathogen is also involved in human local infections, like the “seal finger”, resulting from captive pinnipeds bites. However, it has not been so far described as systemic pathogens of wild cetaceans and pinnipeds. E. rhusiopathiae could be therefore considered as a potentially emergent pathogen which could have important repercussions on human health, particularly veterinarians, marine mammals rescue teams and zoos. [less ▲]

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See detailZoonotic diseases in pet birds -a short review
Boseret, Géraldine ULg

Poster (2011, December 09)

The term « Pet bird » designates birds housed and breeded for an exclusively ornamental use. This category includes mainly Passeriformes (canaries, finches…) and Psittaciformes (parrots, parakeets…), and ... [more ▼]

The term « Pet bird » designates birds housed and breeded for an exclusively ornamental use. This category includes mainly Passeriformes (canaries, finches…) and Psittaciformes (parrots, parakeets…), and is a not-so-well known vet’s clientship fraction. Many families indeed own their « kitchen canary », which represent a lucrative business for pet shops or local breeders (e.a. via birds fairs and markets). Besides, some birds are bred for their very high value; for example, in the case of canaries, male and female reproductors with recognized genetic potential are presented in international contests for their posture (the Bossu Belge : fig 1a), their colour (red mosaic: fig 1b) and for their song (Harzer: fig 1c) and sold for rising prices. Finally, exotic birds like parrots (ara, cockatoo…), legally or illegaly traded from Asia, are however very popular pets and profusely represented in zoos and parks. Notwithstanding these economic facts, these animals are potential carriers and/or transmitters of zoonotic diseases. Some of them could have an important impact on human health, like ornithosis, salmonellosis or even H5N1 high pathogenic avian influenza. This review, although non exhausive, has as aim to enlighten, by the description of several cases of birds-humans transmission the risks encountered by birds owners, including children, and on another point of view to assess the potential economic consequences. [less ▲]

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See detailLe système de contrôle du chant des passériformes : un modèle d’étude de la plasticité neuronale
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Beckers, Jean-François ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2010), 154(1), 48-60

In many songbirds species, wherein we can find the domestic canary (Serinus canaria), singing is generally produced either to defend a territory or to attract a mate. The Song Control System is a neural ... [more ▼]

In many songbirds species, wherein we can find the domestic canary (Serinus canaria), singing is generally produced either to defend a territory or to attract a mate. The Song Control System is a neural specialization, mostly located in telencephalic regions of the brain and associated to the control of song learning, perception and production. External factors such as testosterone (T), photoperiod and social cues have been described to modulate singing behaviour. Parallel to the song behaviour, some of the song control system nuclei (HVC, RA and Area X) demonstrate a puzzling amount of seasonal plasticity. Their volumes varies seasonally based on changes in cell spacing, neuropile size, dendritic arborisation and in the case on the nidopallial nucleus HVC on the incorporation of newborn neurons. We present here a review of this curious phenomenon of adult neuroplasticity associated to a complex behaviour, which doesn’t occur as far as we know in the mammalian adult brain [less ▲]

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See detailDoublecortin as a Marker of Adult Neuroplasticity in the Canary Song Control Nucleus Hvc
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Konkle, A. T. et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2008), 27(4), 801-17

It is established that in songbirds the size of several brain song control nuclei varies seasonally, based on changes in cell size, dendritic branching and, in nucleus HVC, the incorporation of newborn ... [more ▼]

It is established that in songbirds the size of several brain song control nuclei varies seasonally, based on changes in cell size, dendritic branching and, in nucleus HVC, the incorporation of newborn neurons. In the developing and adult mammalian brain, the protein doublecortin (DCX) is expressed in postmitotic neurons and, as a part of the microtubule machinery, required for neuronal migration. We recently showed that in adult canaries, DCX-immunoreactive (ir) cells are present throughout the telencephalon, but the link between DCX and the active neurogenesis observed in songbirds remained uncertain. We demonstrate here that DCX labels recently born cells in the canary telencephalon and that, in parallel with changes in HVC volume, the number of DCX-ir cells is increased specifically in the HVC of testosterone-treated males compared with castrates, and in castrated testosterone-treated males paired with a female as compared with males paired with another male. The numbers of elongated DCX-ir cells (presumptive migrating neurons) and round multipolar DCX-ir cells (differentiating neurons) were also affected by the sex of the subjects and their photoperiodic condition (photosensitive vs photostimulated vs photorefractory). Thus, in canaries the endocrine state, as well as the social or photoperiodic condition independently of variation in steroid hormone action, affects the number of cells expressing a protein involved in neuronal migration specifically in brain areas that incorporate new neurons in the telencephalon. The DCX gene may be one of the targets by which testosterone and social stimuli induce seasonal changes in the volume of song nuclei. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroplasticité saisonnière chez le canari adulte (Serinus canaria): expression des protéines Doublecortin et Reelin et modulation par les hormones stéroïdes, la photopériode et l'environnement social.
Boseret, Géraldine ULg

Doctoral thesis (2008)

Dans de nombreuses espèces d’oiseaux chanteurs (ou Passériformes), dont fait partie le canari domestique (Serinus canaria), le comportement de chant est produit à la fois pour défendre un territoire ou ... [more ▼]

Dans de nombreuses espèces d’oiseaux chanteurs (ou Passériformes), dont fait partie le canari domestique (Serinus canaria), le comportement de chant est produit à la fois pour défendre un territoire ou attirer un partenaire. Le Système de Conntrôle du Chant est un réseau nerveux central spécialisé, principalement localisé au niveau du télencéphale et associé au contrôle de l’apprentissage, la perception et la production du chant. Ce comportement a été décrit subir la modulation de facteurs externes, tels que la testostérone, la photopériode et les interactions sociales. En parallèle avec le comportement de chant, certains des noyaux appartenant au Système de Contrôle du Chant (HVC, RA et Area X) présentent un phénomène de plasticité saisonnière nerveuse fascinante. Le volume de ces noyaux augmente notamment par espacement des cellules, agrandissement de la taille du neuropile et de l’arborisation dendritique et, dans le cas particulier d’HVC, par incorporation de neurones nouveaux-nés. Nous proposons ici une synthèse de la littérature concernant ce phénomène tout à fait particulier ; en effet, la régénération des neurones du système nerveux central est considérée comme inexistante -ou uniquement limitée à la production de quelques interneurones- chez les mammifères. L’étude de la neuroplasticité chez l’oiseau chanteur constitue dès lors un modèle tout à fait remarquable et offrant des perspectives nouvelles dans l’étude du cerveau des vertébrés. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of reelin, its receptors and its intracellular signaling protein, Disabled1 in the canary brain: relationships with the song control system.
Balthazart, Jacques ULg; Voigt, C.; Boseret, Géraldine ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2008), 153(4), 944-62

Songbirds produce learned vocalizations that are controlled by a specialized network of neural structures, the song control system. Several nuclei in this song control system demonstrate a marked degree ... [more ▼]

Songbirds produce learned vocalizations that are controlled by a specialized network of neural structures, the song control system. Several nuclei in this song control system demonstrate a marked degree of adult seasonal plasticity. Nucleus volume varies seasonally based on changes in cell size or spacing, and in the case of nucleus HVC and area X on the incorporation of new neurons. Reelin, a large glycoprotein defective in reeler mice, is assumed to determine the final location of migrating neurons in the developing brain. In mammals, reelin is also expressed in the adult brain but its functions are less well characterized. We investigated the relationships between the expression of reelin and/or its receptors and the dramatic seasonal plasticity in the canary (Serinus canaria) brain. We detected a broad distribution of the reelin protein, its mRNA and the mRNAs encoding for the reelin receptors (VLDLR and ApoER2) as well as for its intracellular signaling protein, Disabled1. These different mRNAs and proteins did not display the same neuroanatomical distribution and were not clearly associated, in an exclusive manner, with telencephalic brain areas that incorporate new neurons in adulthood. Song control nuclei were associated with a particular specialized expression of reelin and its mRNA, with the reelin signal being either denser or lighter in the song nucleus than in the surrounding tissue. The density of reelin-immunoreactive structures did not seem to be affected by 4 weeks of treatment with exogenous testosterone. These observations do not provide conclusive evidence that reelin plays a prominent role in the positioning of new neurons in the adult canary brain but call for additional work on this protein analyzing its expression comparatively during development and in adulthood with a better temporal resolution at critical points in the reproductive cycle when brain plasticity is known to occur. [less ▲]

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See detailThe microtubule-associated protein doublecortin is broadly expressed in the telencephalon of adult canaries
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Ball, G. F.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy (2007), 33(3), 140-154

The protein doublecortin (DCX) is expressed in post-mitotic migrating and differentiating neurons in the developing vertebrate brain and, as a part of the microtubule machinery, is required for neuronal ... [more ▼]

The protein doublecortin (DCX) is expressed in post-mitotic migrating and differentiating neurons in the developing vertebrate brain and, as a part of the microtubule machinery, is required for neuronal migration. DCX expression is generally maximal during embryonic and early post-natal life but decreases markedly and almost disappears in older animals in parallel with the major decrease or cessation of neurogenesis. In several seasonally breeding songbird species such as canaries, the volume of several song control nuclei in the brain varies seasonally such that the largest nuclei are observed in the late spring and early summer. This variation is based on changes in cell size, dendritic branching, and, in nucleus HVC, on the incorporation of neurons newly born in adulthood. Because songbirds maintain an active neurogenesis and neuronal incorporation in their telencephalon throughout their lives, we investigated here the distribution of DCX-immunoreactive (ir) structures in the brain of adult male canaries. Densely stained DCX-ir cells were found exclusively in parts of the telencephalon that are known to incorporate new neurons in adulthood, in particular the nidopallium. Within this brain region, the boundaries of the song control nucleus HVC could be clearly distinguished from surrounding structures by a higher density of DCX-ir structures. In most telencephalic areas, about two thirds of these cells displayed a uni- or bipolar fusiform morphology suggesting they were migrating neurons. The rest of the DCX-ir cells in the telencephalon were larger and had a round multipolar morphology. No such staining was found in the rest of the brain. The broad expression of DCX specifically in adult brain structures that exhibit the characteristic of active incorporation of new neurons suggests that DCX plays a key role in the migration of new neurons in the brain of adult songbirds as it presumably does during ontogeny. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial context affects testosterone-induced singing and the volume of song control nuclei in male canaries (Serinus canaria)
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Carere, C.; Ball, G. F. et al

in Journal of Neurobiology (2006), 66(10), 1044-1060

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See detailTestosterone-induced singing is regulated by social status in male canaries (serinus canaria)
Carere, C.; Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Ball, G. F. et al

in Hormones & Behavior (2005, June), 48(1), 92

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See detailDistribution of Reelin and its cytoplasmic signaling protein, DAB-1 in the forebrain of male canaries
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Ball, G. F.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (2005, June), 48(1), 90

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See detailSocial modulation of testosterone-induced singing in canaries
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Ball, G. F.; Balthazart, Jacques ULg

in Hormones & Behavior (2004, June), 46(1), 108

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See detailIdentification et fréquences des bactéries impliquées dans des processus pathologiques chez les mammifères marins
Boseret, Géraldine ULg

Master of advanced studies dissertation (2003)

Cette étude rassemble les résultats obtenus lors d'analyses bactériologiques effectuées sur les mammifères marins échoués au large des côtes belge et du nord de la France, ainsi que sur des organes de ... [more ▼]

Cette étude rassemble les résultats obtenus lors d'analyses bactériologiques effectuées sur les mammifères marins échoués au large des côtes belge et du nord de la France, ainsi que sur des organes de phoques de la mer Caspienne. Escherichia coli bêta-hémolytique est la bactérie isolée le plus fréquemment des phoques examinés. Chez les cétacés, Aeromonas sp. est prédominant sur les autres genres bactériens identifiés, et est le second genre le plus souvent isolé des pinnipèdes. Le diagnostic bactériologique le plus couramment formulé est celui de septicémie ; le poumon est l'organe le plus souvent infecté. Cette étude a pour objet d'approfondir les données existantes en bactériologie des mammifères marins et de donner de nouveaux outils dans la prévention et le traitement des infections bactériennes de ces animaux, en mettant en évidence l'émergence possible de nouveaux agents pathogènes. [less ▲]

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See detailAEROMONAS SPP AS PATHOGENS FOR MARINE MAMMALS IN SYSTEMIC AND SKIN DISEASES
Boseret, Géraldine ULg

in INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON DISEASES OF ZOO AND WILDLIFE PROCEEDINGS SF 997.5 I57 (2003)

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