References of "Bormann, Jeanne"
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See detailStrategies to combine novel traits across countries: example of heat stress
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Vandenplas, Jérémie ULg; Carabaño, Maria Jesus et al

Conference (2014, May 21)

Nowadays, novel traits are of great interest. However, phenotypes are siloed and mainly not shared. Heat stress is becoming problematic affecting animals’ performances and their well-being. Heat stress ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, novel traits are of great interest. However, phenotypes are siloed and mainly not shared. Heat stress is becoming problematic affecting animals’ performances and their well-being. Heat stress tolerance as a novel trait is only addressed by isolated within-country research studies. Integration and combination of local and foreign information sources is needed for better accuracy genetic evaluations. Therefore, this study was aimed to test the potential combination of sources of external information towards the evaluation of heat stress tolerance of dairy cattle. Long-term cow performances linked to environmental descriptors (weather parameters as proxy to climate change) collected over 10 years under the temperate conditions of the Walloon Region of Belgium and the hotter and warm Mediterranean conditions of Andalusia and Castile-La-Mancha Spanish regions were available. A total of 1,604,775 milk, fat, and protein test-day (TD) records linked to average daily temperature humidity (THI) values for 3-day lag before each TD were considered. Under a first strategy considering free-access to raw-data (phenotype and pedigree), a joint evaluation was firstly run using reaction norm models where production traits were considered as function of THI. A Belgian and a Spanish evaluation were also run using the same model. An alternative strategy considering only access to external information (i.e. regression coefficients for additive genetic effects (â and their associated REL)) was tested. In this case, foreign â and their REL resulting from the Spanish evaluation were first converted to the Belgian trait and thereafter integrated in the Belgian evaluation using a Bayesian approach. Rank correlations between regression coefficients, â (of the 1,104 bulls having daughters only in Spain) estimated by Belgian evaluation and â estimated by the joint evaluation were moderate (<=0.70). Corresponding rank correlations between â estimated by joint and Bayesian evaluations were significantly higher (ranging from 0.967 to 0.998), indicating that the Bayesian evaluation integrating external information was in good concordance with the joint evaluation. Results from this study indicated that the integration of external information via the Bayesian approach has a good potential to improve the genetic evaluation of sparse and siloed novel traits. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating daily yield and content of major fatty acids from single milking
Arnould, Valérie ULg; Reding, Romain; Delvaux, Charles et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

Reducing the frequency of milk recording and the number of recorded samples per test-day could be a solution in order to reduce costs of official milk recording. However, fewer samples lead to a decrease ... [more ▼]

Reducing the frequency of milk recording and the number of recorded samples per test-day could be a solution in order to reduce costs of official milk recording. However, fewer samples lead to a decrease in the accuracy of predicted daily yields. Unfortunately, the current published equations use the milking interval that is often not available and/or reliable in practice. The first objective of this study was to propose models using easily available traits. Therefore the milking interval was replaced by a combination of data easily recorded by milk recording. The second objective of this study was to enlarge the previous investigations to milk fatty acids (FA) in order to propose a practical method for estimating accurate daily milk, fat and major FA yields from single milking. The fit goodness of proposed models was evaluated based on the correlation values between the estimated and observed daily yields in addition to the calculation of the mean square error. Obtained results are promising. Correlation values were comprised between 96.4% and 97.6% when daily yield were estimated from morning milking, and from 96.9% to 98.3% when daily yield were estimated from evening milking. The combination of records related to lactation stage, month of test, milk yield, and fat could replace the milking interval effect. Because of their simplicity, proposed models would be easy to implement. [less ▲]

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See detailStrategies to combine novel traits across countries: example of heat stress
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Vandenplas, Jérémie ULg; Carabaño, Maria Jesus et al

in Interbull Bulletin (2014), 48

Nowadays, novel traits are of great interest. However, phenotypes are siloed and mainly not shared. Heat stress is becoming problematic affecting animals’ performances and their well-being. Heat stress ... [more ▼]

Nowadays, novel traits are of great interest. However, phenotypes are siloed and mainly not shared. Heat stress is becoming problematic affecting animals’ performances and their well-being. Heat stress tolerance as a novel trait is only addressed by isolated within-country research studies. Integration and combination of local and foreign information sources is needed for better accuracy genetic evaluations. Therefore, this study was aimed to test the potential combination of sources of external information towards the evaluation of heat stress tolerance of dairy cattle. Long-term cow performances linked to environmental descriptors (weather parameters as proxy to climate change) collected over 10 years under the temperate conditions of the Walloon Region of Belgium and the hotter and warm Mediterranean conditions of Andalusia and Castile-La-Mancha Spanish regions were available. A total of 1,604,775 milk, fat, and protein test-day (TD) records linked to average daily temperature humidity (THI) values for 3-day lag before each TD were considered. Under a first strategy considering free-access to raw-data (phenotype and pedigree), a joint evaluation was firstly run using reaction norm models where production traits were considered as function of THI. A Belgian and a Spanish evaluation were also run using the same model. An alternative strategy considering only access to external information (i.e. regression coefficients for additive genetic effects (â and their associated REL)) was tested. In this case, foreign â and their REL resulting from the Spanish evaluation were first converted to the Belgian trait and thereafter integrated in the Belgian evaluation using a Bayesian approach. Rank correlations between regression coefficients, â (of the 1,104 bulls having daughters only in Spain) estimated by Belgian evaluation and â estimated by the joint evaluation were moderate (<=0.70). Corresponding rank correlations between â estimated by joint and Bayesian evaluations were significantly higher (ranging from 0.967 to 0.998), indicating that the Bayesian evaluation integrating external information was in good concordance with the joint evaluation. Results from this study indicated that the integration of external information via the Bayesian approach has a good potential to improve the genetic evaluation of sparse and siloed novel traits. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuartige Management Tools für Milchviehbetrieb mittels Spektralanalytik
Arnould, Valérie ULg; Reding, Romain; Bormann, Jeanne et al

Article for general public (2013)

In den letzten Jahrzenten wurde die Milch- und Fleischproduktion mehr und mehr mit generellen Nachhaltigkeitsfragen in Verbindung gebracht. Sehr oft wird eine bessere Produktionsnachhaltigkeit auch mit ... [more ▼]

In den letzten Jahrzenten wurde die Milch- und Fleischproduktion mehr und mehr mit generellen Nachhaltigkeitsfragen in Verbindung gebracht. Sehr oft wird eine bessere Produktionsnachhaltigkeit auch mit ökonomischen Aspekten verbunden. In der Tat liegt die Kunst der modernen Milchproduktion scheinbar vor allem darin, die Produktion (egal ob tier- oder betriebsindividuell) stetig bei möglichst gleichbleibenden oder gar noch geringeren Kosten zu erhöhen. Daneben ist zu bedenken, dass Konsumenten heutzutage neben preislichen Aspekten sehr oft zusätzlich Gesundheitsaspekte ins Spiel bringen, so dass es für Milchbetriebe nicht unwesentlich ist, die Produktion in gewisser Weise diesen Ansprüchen nach zu gestalten. Glücklicherweise können entscheidende Inhaltsstoffe wie der Milchfettgehalt oder das Fettsäuremuster der Milch durch Managementfaktoren wie Zucht, Selektion, Fütterung und Haltungsbedingungen zum Positiven beeinflusst werden und den Anforderungen der Nachfrageseite besser angepasst werden. Genau bei dieser Problematik liegen die Ansatzpunkte der verschiedenen CONVIS Projekte (QuaM, ManageMILK und OptiMIR) im Bereich Spektralanalysen der Milch. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of Heat Stress Effects on Production Traits and Somatic Cell Score of Holsteins in a Temperate Environment
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Bormann, Jeanne; M'Hamdi, Naceur et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2013), 96(3), 1844-1855

This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed to evaluate the degree of thermal stress exhibited by Holsteins under a continental temperate climate. Milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count test-day records collected between 2000 and 2011 from 23,963 cows in 604 herds were combined with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations in Luxembourg. Daily values of six different thermal indices (TI) weighted in term of temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed were calculated by averaging hourly TI over 24 hours. Heat stress thresholds were firstly identified by a broken-line regression model. Regression models were thereafter applied to quantify milk production losses due to heat stress. The tipping points at which milk and protein yields declined were effectively identified. For fat yield, no valid threshold was identified for any of the studied TI. Daily fat yields tended to decrease steadily with increasing values of TI. Daily somatic cell scores (SCS) pattern was marked by increased values at both lowest and highest TI ranges with a more pronounced reaction to cold stress for apparent temperature indices. Thresholds differed between TI and traits. For production traits, they ranged from 62 (TI1) to 80 (TI3) for temperature-humidity indices (THI) and from 16 (TI5) to 20 (TI6) for apparent temperature indices. Corresponding SCS thresholds were higher and ranged from 66 (TI1) to 82 (TI3) and from 20 (TI5) to 23 (TI6), respectively. The largest milk decline per unit of mild, moderate, and extreme heat stress levels of 0.164, 0.356, and 0.955 kg, respectively, was observed when using the conventional THI (TI1). The highest yearly milk, fat, and protein losses of 54, 5.7, and 4.2 kg respectively were detected by TI2, the THI index that is adjusted for wind speed and solar radiation. The latter index could be considered as the best indicator of heat stress to be used for forecast and herd management in a first step in temperate regions under anticipated climate changes. [less ▲]

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See detailReview: Milk composition as management tool of sustainability
Arnould, Valérie ULg; Reding, Romain; Bormann, Jeanne et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2013), 17(4), 613-621

The main objective of this paper is the use of milk composition data as a management tool. Milk composition, and in particular, milk fat content and fatty acid profiles may be significantly altered due to ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this paper is the use of milk composition data as a management tool. Milk composition, and in particular, milk fat content and fatty acid profiles may be significantly altered due to a variety of factors. These factors are reviewed in the literature; they include diet, animal (genetic) selection, management aspects and animal health. Changes in milk composition can be used as an indicator of the animal’s metabolic status or the efficiency of the feed management system. The advantages of using this kind of data as a management tool would be to allow the early detection of metabolic or management problems. The present review suggests that milk and, especially milk fat composition may be used as a sustainability management tool and as a monitoring and prevention tool for several pathologies or health disorders in dairy cattle. Further, due to the use of MIR technology, these tools may be easily implemented in practice and are relatively cheap. In the field, milk labs or milk recording agencies would be able to alert farmers whenever threshold values for disease were reached, allowing them to improve their dairy production from an economic, ecological and animal (welfare) point of view. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic variation in heat stress tolerance of Holsteins producing under a continental temperate environment
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Arnould, Valérie ULg; Bormann, Jeanne et al

Poster (2012)

Under projected climate changes, considerations for heat stress tolerance but also for genotype by environment interactions should enter breeding decisions, both for importing, but also exporting ... [more ▼]

Under projected climate changes, considerations for heat stress tolerance but also for genotype by environment interactions should enter breeding decisions, both for importing, but also exporting countries. Most studies concerning the breeding strategies on heat stress tolerance used the temperature humidity index (THI) to assess the thermal stress in a given environment and assumed a specific threshold to each studied population with the same response to each individual above this threshold. Recently new comprehensive thermal indices (TI) integrating radiation solar, wind speed, in addition to temperature and relative humidity were developed. Therefore, the aim of this study is advanced modelling of milk yield trait to evaluate the genetic variation in heat stress tolerance of Holsteins in a temperate environment using random regressions models and six new comprehensive TI. A total of 107,350 test day milk records were available for 12,099 primiparous Holsteins calving from 2000 to 2010. Test-day milk records were merged with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations across Luxembourg. Daily values of 6 new comprehensive TI (3 THI and 3 apparent temperature indices) were calculated by averaging hourly TI over 24 hours. The average distance between herds and their meteorological reference station was of 16 km. Sensitivity of cows to the climate environmental conditions was modelled by applying a reaction norm for each animal, representing its EBV for milk yield on values of the TI on the day in milk (DIM). Six separate random regression models were applied using time-dependent (DIM) and specific TI-dependent covariates. Random effects were additive genetic, permanent environmental, and herd year modelled with Legendre polynomials of order 2 for both DIM and TI. Genetic variances of the different TI evaluated in this study represent 27 to 30% of their correspondent variances for DIM effect. Permanent environmental and genetic variances of TI effect were in the same range. Additive genetic variances and heritabilities for daily milk yield slightly decreased with increasing degrees of the different THI and apparent temperature indices. The average daily milk heritability overall the lactation at the mean of each of the six TI was of 0.28. Genetic correlations between adjacent points across the lactation were > 0.90. Correlations between extreme distant DIM (e.g. early and late lactation stage) were reduced at 0.38 to 0.52. The overall genetic correlations between the different values of each TI remain high (> 0.85). EBV’s summing regular additive effect (DIM effect) and tolerance to heat stress (TI effect) were computed for several combinations of DIM and TI values. Ranking for sires and cows did not change among the 6 heat stress indicators. The correlations between EBVs estimated with the six models were greater than 0.90. In conclusion, the different models depicted genetic variation of milk yield among combinations of DIM and TI levels without defining thresholds in advance. Genetic variation was slightly lower when TI values exceed the thermoneutral zone. Breeding for reduced thermal sensitivity using any of the six indicators of heat stress evaluated in this study is possible. The indicator TI2 representing the adjusted THI for radiation solar and wind speed is favoured because it was the indicator that did identify the highest yearly milk losses under this continental temperate environment. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing heat stress effects on production traits of Holsteins in a temperate region
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Bormann, Jeanne; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

Conference (2012)

Heat stress impaired productive, reproductive and animal behaviour. Examination of milk production loss due to heat stress was mainly evaluated in USA and few tropical countries using the temperature ... [more ▼]

Heat stress impaired productive, reproductive and animal behaviour. Examination of milk production loss due to heat stress was mainly evaluated in USA and few tropical countries using the temperature humidity index (THI1) developed in the 1950’s. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of six new environmental stress indices on production traits in a temperate region. These indices include solar radiation and wind speed in addition to the temperature and humidity only defining THI1. For that purpose, 530820 milk, fat, protein, and somatic cell count first-lactation test-day records (TD) collected between 2000 and 2011 in Luxembourg were used. TD records were merged with meteorological data from 14 public weather stations. Each TD was assigned to the average daily thermal index of the 3 days before. Firstly, broken-line regression models were applied to identify the threshold of heat stress (THR) for each of the thermal indices. The decline of daily production of the different traits above THR point was assessed by mixed linear models including regression on unit of each of the thermal index. Estimates of THR were specific to each thermal index and trait. Significant decrease of milk, fat and protein yields above THR was observed for all studied thermal predictors. Whereas, an increase of the somatic cell score was observed above the specific THR point. THR estimates for THI1 and THI6 were of 68 and 80 and 62 and 78 for milk and protein yields respectively. Respective rate of decline per unit were of 0.243 and 0.188 kg and 0.0045 and 0.0051 kg respectively. Results from this phenotypic analysis show that evaluating heat tolerance based on bio-meteorological indicators is promising and phenotypic and genetic implications should be investigated. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing heat stress effects on production traits of Holsteins in a temperate region
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Bormann, Jeanne; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Book of abstracts of the 63rd Annual Meeting of the European Association for Animal Production (2012)

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See detailSustainable dairy farming - A case study of Holsteins in a developed and an emerging country
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Rekik, Boulbaba; Bormann, Jeanne et al

Conference (2009, September 23)

Sustainability of breeding programs under the flow of exchange among various environments are conditioned by the ability of genotypes to adjust sufficiently their phenotypes in response to changes in ... [more ▼]

Sustainability of breeding programs under the flow of exchange among various environments are conditioned by the ability of genotypes to adjust sufficiently their phenotypes in response to changes in their new bio-physical conditions, and also by the capabilities of farmers to balance between environmental, ethical, social. and economic aspects. The objective of this paper was to quantify the effectiveness of genetic responses from indirect selection in high- and low- to medium- input systems using Luxembourg and Tunisian Hoisteins. The magnitude of genotype-by-environment interaction (GxE) for production traits was firstly investigated based on the country border delimitation as environmental character state. Secondly, three herd management levels reflecting feeding and management intensity were identified in each country and GxE was investigated within and across country environments. Significant GxE was detected for milk yield and persistency with large differences in genetic and permanent environmental variances between the 2 countries. Genetic correlations for 305-d milk yield and persistency between Luxembourg and Tunisia were 0.60 and 0.36. Low rank correlations obtained between estimated breeding values of common sires translated a significant re-ranking between the 2 countries. Within-country environments analysis show that the magnitude of GxE varied from only scaling effects resulting from heterogeneous variances in high-input systems to considerable re-ranking of common sires under limited feeding resources, low management care, and stressful conditions in low-input systems. Overall, this study shows that substantial differences exist between Hoisteins in terms of their sensitivity to production environ ment suspecting the sustainability of the dairying system. In high-input systems, GxE effects are expected to be easily managed but harmful effects of intensive dairy systems should be considered. Selection of breeds under less intensive production systems respecting the ruminant's specificities should be encouraged. In law-input systems, selection for adaptive traits under their specifie conditions and improvement of management conditions and husbandry practices are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental sensitivity for milk yield in Luxembourg and Tunisian Holsteins by herd management level.
Hammami, Hedi ULg; Rekik, Boulbaba; Bastin, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2009), 92(9), 4604-12

Milk production data of Luxembourg and Tunisian Holstein cows were analyzed using herd management (HM) level. Herds in each country were clustered into high, medium, and low HM levels based on solutions ... [more ▼]

Milk production data of Luxembourg and Tunisian Holstein cows were analyzed using herd management (HM) level. Herds in each country were clustered into high, medium, and low HM levels based on solutions of herd-test-date and herd-year of calving effects from national evaluations. Data from both populations included 730,810 test-day (TD) milk yield records from 87,734 first-lactation cows. A multi-trait, random regression TD model was used to estimate (co)variance components for milk yield within and across country HM levels. Additive genetic and permanent environmental variances of TD milk yields varied with management level in Tunisia and Luxembourg. Additive variances were smaller across HM levels in Tunisia than in Luxembourg, whereas permanent environmental variances were larger in Tunisian HM levels. Highest heritability estimates of 305-d milk yield (0.41 and 0.21) were found in high HM levels, whereas lowest estimates (0.31 and 0.12, respectively) were associated with low HM levels in both countries. Genetic correlations among Luxembourg HM levels were >0.96, whereas those among Tunisian HM levels were below 0.80. Respective rank orders of sires ranged from 0.73 to 0.83 across Luxembourg environments and from 0.33 to 0.42 across Tunisian HM levels indicating high re-ranking of sires in Tunisia and only a scaling effect in Luxembourg. Across-country environment analysis showed that estimates of genetic variance in the high, medium, and low classes of Tunisian environments were 45, 69, and 81% lower, respectively, than the estimate found in the high Luxembourg HM level. Genetic correlations among 305-d milk yields in Tunisian and Luxembourg HM environments ranged from 0.39 to 0.79. The largest estimated genetic correlation was found between the medium Luxembourg and high Tunisian HM levels. Rank correlations for common sires' estimated breeding values among HM environments were low and ranged from 0.19 to 0.39, implying the existence of genotype by environment interaction. These results indicate that daughters of superior sires in Luxembourg have their genetic expression for milk production limited under Tunisian environments. Milk production of cows in the medium and low Luxembourg environments were good predictors of that of their paternal half-sisters in the high Tunisian HM level. Breeding decisions in low-input Tunisian environment should utilize semen from sires with daughters in similar production environments rather than semen of bulls proven in higher management levels. [less ▲]

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