References of "Bonhomme, Vincent"
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See detailEffect of Multicolumn Lead Spinal Cord Stimulation on Low Back Pain in Failed Back Surgery Patients: A Three-Year Follow-Up
Remacle, Thibault ULiege; BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege; Renwart, Henri-Jean et al

in Neuromodulation (2017)

OBJECTIVES:Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) remains poorly efficient at reducing back pain in failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients. We aimed at determining whether a new multicolumn lead SCS ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES:Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) remains poorly efficient at reducing back pain in failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients. We aimed at determining whether a new multicolumn lead SCS technique was efficient at durably reducing their leg (LP) and back (BP) pain. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Sixty-two consecutive refractory FBSS patients received multicolumn SCS. Visual analogue scale (VAS) self-evaluation of BP, LP, and limitation of daily activity (LAD) were recorded preoperatively and at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after surgery. Quality of sleep and use of concomitant medications were also recorded. RESULTS:Complete datasets were obtained in 29 patients. BP (median VAS [25-75 centiles]) significantly decreased from 9 (8.5-10) preoperatively, to 3 (3-4) at short-term follow-up (2 months), and rose up to 5 (4-5) at 36 months. LP evolved from 7 (6-8) preoperatively, to 2.5 (2-3) at short-term follow-up, and 3 (2-3) at 36 months. Correspondingly, LAD VAS was 8 (8-9) preoperatively, and decreased to stable values of 3 (3-4) during the follow-up period. Quality of sleep also improved, with 72% of patients reporting poor sleep preoperatively to 0-7% in the follow-up period until 36 months. The percentages of patients regularly taking analgesic and/or co-analgesic medications decreased from 100% preoperatively to 8, 4, 12, 19, and 19%. CONCLUSION:Multicolumn lead SCS in FBSS patients significantly improve BP, LP, quality of life, and medication consumption for at least 36 months. A classical placebo effect cannot account for long-term improvements of such magnitude. [less ▲]

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See detailSedation of Patients With Disorders of Consciousness During Neuroimaging: Effects on Resting State Functional Brain Connectivity.
KIRSCH, Murielle ULiege; Guldenmund, Pieter; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2017), 124(2),

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See detailResting-state Network-specific Breakdown of Functional Connectivity during Ketamine Alteration of Consciousness in Volunteers
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Demertzi, Athina ULiege et al

in Anesthesiology (2016), 125(5), 873-878

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control ... [more ▼]

Background: Consciousness-altering anesthetic agents disturb connectivity between brain regions composing the resting-state consciousness networks (RSNs). The default mode network (DMn), executive control network, salience network (SALn), auditory network, sensorimotor network (SMn), and visual network sustain mentation. Ketamine modifies consciousness differently from other agents, producing psychedelic dreaming and no apparent interaction with the environment. The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore ketamine-induced changes in RSNs connectivity. Methods: Fourteen healthy volunteers received stepwise intravenous infusions of ketamine up to loss of responsiveness. Because of agitation, data from six subjects were excluded from analysis. RSNs connectivity was compared between absence of ketamine (wake state [W1]), light ketamine sedation, and ketamine-induced unresponsiveness (deep sedation [S2]). Results: Increasing the depth of ketamine sedation from W1 to S2 altered DMn and SALn connectivity and suppressed the anticorrelated activity between DMn and other brain regions. During S2, DMn connectivity, particularly between the medial prefrontal cortex and the remaining network (effect size β [95% CI]: W1 = 0.20 [0.18 to 0.22]; S2 = 0.07 [0.04 to 0.09]), and DMn anticorrelated activity (e.g., right sensory cortex: W1 = −0.07 [−0.09 to −0.04]; S2 = 0.04 [0.01 to 0.06]) were broken down. SALn connectivity was nonuniformly suppressed (e.g., left parietal operculum: W1 = 0.08 [0.06 to 0.09]; S2 = 0.05 [0.02 to 0.07]). Executive control networks, auditory network, SMn, and visual network were minimally affected. Conclusions: Ketamine induces specific changes in connectivity within and between RSNs. Breakdown of frontoparietal DMn connectivity and DMn anticorrelation and sensory and SMn connectivity preservation are common to ketamine and propofol-induced alterations of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalgesia monitoring
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege

Conference (2016, April 14)

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See detailPositron Emission Tomography: Basic Principles, New Applications, and Studies Under Anesthesia
KIRSCH, Murielle ULiege; Wannez, Sarah ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege et al

in International Anesthesiology Clinics (2016)

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See detailNouveautés sur le monitorage de la profondeur d’anesthésie
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege

Conference (2016)

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See detailNew insghts into nociception monitoring during general anesthesia
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege

Conference (2016)

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See detailDevelopment and validation of a morphologic obstructive sleep apnea prediction score: The DES-OSA score
Deflandre, E.; Degey, S.; Brichant, Jean-Francois ULiege et al

in Anesthesia and Analgesia (2016), 122(2), 363-372

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and underdiagnosed entity that favors perioperative morbidity. Several anatomical characteristics predispose to OSA. We developed a new clinical score ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common and underdiagnosed entity that favors perioperative morbidity. Several anatomical characteristics predispose to OSA. We developed a new clinical score that would detect OSA based on the patient's morphologic characteristics only. METHODS: Patients (n = 149) scheduled for an overnight polysomnography were included. Their morphologic metrics were compared, and combinations of them were tested for their ability to predict at least mild, moderate-to-severe, or severe OSA, as defined by an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5, >15, or >30 events/h. This ability was calculated using Cohen κ coefficient and prediction probability. RESULTS: The score with best prediction abilities (DES-OSA score) considered 5 variables: Mallampati score, distance between the thyroid and the chin, body mass index, neck circumference, and sex. Those variables were weighted by 1, 2, or 3 points. DES-OSA score >5, 6, and 7 were associated with increased probability of an AHI >5, >15, or >30 events/h, respectively, and those thresholds had the best Cohen κ coefficient, sensitivities, and specificities. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve was 0.832 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.762-0.902), 0.805 (95% CI, 0.734-0.876), and 0.834 (95% CI, 0.757-0.911) for DES-OSA at predicting an AHI >5, >15, and >30 events/h, respectively. With the aforementioned thresholds, corresponding sensitivities (95% CI) were 82.7% (74.5-88.7), 77.1% (66.9-84.9), and 75% (61.0-85.1), and specificities (95% CI) were 72.4% (54.0-85.4), 73.2% (60.3-83.1), and 76.9% (67.2-84.4). Validation of DES-OSA performance in an independent sample yielded highly similar results. CONCLUSIONS: DES-OSA is a simple score for detecting OSA patients. Its originality relies on its morphologic nature. Derived from a European population, it may prove useful in a preoperative setting, but it has still to be compared with other screening tools in a general surgical population and in other ethnic groups. © 2016 International Anesthesia Research Society. [less ▲]

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See detailLarge-scale signatures of unconsciousness are consistent with a departure from critical dynamics
Tagliazucchi, E.; Chialvo, D. R.; Siniatchkin, M. et al

in Journal of the Royal Society Interface (2016), 13(114),

Loss of cortical integration and changes in the dynamics of electrophysiological brain signals characterize the transition from wakefulness towards unconsciousness. In this study, we arrive at a basic ... [more ▼]

Loss of cortical integration and changes in the dynamics of electrophysiological brain signals characterize the transition from wakefulness towards unconsciousness. In this study, we arrive at a basic model explaining these observations based on the theory of phase transitions in complex systems. We studied the link between spatial and temporal correlations of large-scale brain activity recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging during wakefulness, propofol-induced sedation and loss of consciousness and during the subsequent recovery. We observed that during unconsciousness activity in frontothalamic regions exhibited a reduction of long-range temporal correlations and a departure of functional connectivity from anatomical constraints. A model of a system exhibiting a phase transition reproduced our findings, as well as the diminished sensitivity of the cortex to external perturbations during unconsciousness. This framework unifies different observations about brain activity during unconsciousness and predicts that the principles we identified are universal and independent from its causes. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat mediates postoperative risk in obstructive sleep apnea: airway obstruction, nocturnal hypoxia or both ?
DEFLANDRE, Eric; BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege; BRICHANT, Jean-François ULiege et al

in Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia = Journal Canadien d'Anesthésie (2016)

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See detailMonitoring depth of anaesthesia
BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege

Conference (2015)

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See detailPreoperative Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure among Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients
Deflandre; Degey, S; BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege et al

in Minerva Anestesiologica (2015), 81(9), 960-7

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See detailPhysiological Signal Processing for Individualized Anti-nociception Management During General Anesthesia: a Review.
De Jonckheere, J.; Bonhomme, Vincent ULiege; Jeanne, M. et al

in Yearbook of medical informatics (2015), 10(1), 95-101

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to review existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation during surgery under general anesthesia. METHODS: General anesthesia combines ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to review existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation during surgery under general anesthesia. METHODS: General anesthesia combines the use of analgesic, hypnotic and muscle-relaxant drugs in order to obtain a correct level of patient non-responsiveness during surgery. During the last decade, great efforts have been deployed in order to find adequate ways to measure how anesthetic drugs affect a patient's response to surgical nociception. Nowadays, though some monitoring devices allow obtaining information about hypnosis and muscle relaxation, no gold standard exists for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation. Articles from the PubMed literature search engine were reviewed. As this paper focused on surgery under general anesthesia, articles about nociception monitoring on conscious patients, in post-anesthesia care unit or in intensive care unit were not considered. RESULTS: In this article, we present a review of existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation, which is based in all cases on the analysis of the autonomous nervous system activity. Presented systems, based on sensors and physiological signals processing algorithms, allow studying the patients' reaction regarding anesthesia and surgery. CONCLUSION: Some technological solutions for nociception / antinociception balance monitoring were described. Though presented devices could constitute efficient solutions for individualized anti-nociception management during general anesthesia, this review of current literature emphasizes the fact that the choice to use one or the other mainly relies on the clinical context and the general purpose of the monitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailAdherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy
Deflandre, Eric ULiege; Degey, Stéphanie; BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege et al

Poster (2014, October)

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See detailAdherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Therapy
Deflandre, Eric ULiege; Degey, Stéphanie; BONHOMME, Vincent ULiege et al

Poster (2014, October)

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See detailPosterior Cingulate Cortex-Related Co-Activation Patterns: A Resting State fMRI Study in Propofol-Induced Loss of Consciousness
Amico, Enrico ULiege; Gomez, Francisco; Di Perri, Carol et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9

Background: Recent studies have been shown that functional connectivity of cerebral areas is not a static phenomenon, but exhibits spontaneous fluctuations over time. There is evidence that fluctuating ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent studies have been shown that functional connectivity of cerebral areas is not a static phenomenon, but exhibits spontaneous fluctuations over time. There is evidence that fluctuating connectivity is an intrinsic phenomenon of brain dynamics that persists during anesthesia. Lately, point process analysis applied on functional data has revealed that much of the information regarding brain connectivity is contained in a fraction of critical time points of a resting state dataset. In the present study we want to extend this methodology for the investigation of resting state fMRI spatial pattern changes during propofol-induced modulation of consciousness, with the aim of extracting new insights on brain networks consciousness-dependent fluctuations. Methods: Resting-state fMRI volumes on 18 healthy subjects were acquired in four clinical states during propofol injection: wakefulness, sedation, unconsciousness, and recovery. The dataset was reduced to a spatio-temporal point process by selecting time points in the Posterior Cingulate Cortex (PCC) at which the signal is higher than a given threshold (i.e., BOLD intensity above 1 standard deviation). Spatial clustering on the PCC time frames extracted was then performed (number of clusters = 8), to obtain 8 different PCC co-activation patterns (CAPs) for each level of consciousness. Results: The current analysis shows that the core of the PCC-CAPs throughout consciousness modulation seems to be preserved. Nonetheless, this methodology enables to differentiate region-specific propofol-induced reductions in PCC-CAPs, some of them already present in the functional connectivity literature (e.g., disconnections of the prefrontal cortex, thalamus, auditory cortex), some others new (e.g., reduced co-activation in motor cortex and visual area). Conclusion: In conclusion, our results indicate that the employed methodology can help in improving and refining the characterization of local functional changes in the brain associated to propofol-induced modulation of consciousness. [less ▲]

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