References of "Bonafe, L"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMutations in FKBP10 cause recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and bruck syndrome.
Kelley, B. P.; Malfait, F.; Bonafe, L. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011)

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal ... [more ▼]

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder of connective tissue characterized by bone fragility and alteration in synthesis and post-translational modification of type I collagen. Autosomal dominant OI is caused by mutations in the genes (COL1A1 or COL1A2) encoding the chains of type I collagen. Bruck syndrome is a recessive disorder featuring congenital contractures in addition to bone fragility; Bruck syndrome type 2 is caused by mutations in PLOD2 encoding collagen lysyl hydroxylase, while Bruck Syndrome type 1 has been mapped to 17q12 but the gene has remained elusive so far. Recently, the molecular spectrum of OI has been expanded with the description of the basis of a unique post-translational modification of type I procollagen, i.e. 3-prolyl-hydroxylation. Three proteins, cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), prolyl-3-hydroxylase-1 (P3H1, encoded by the LEPRE1 gene), and the prolyl cis-trans isomerase cyclophilin-B (PPIB) form a complex that is required for fibrillar collagen 3-prolyl-hydroxylation and mutations in each gene have been shown to cause recessive forms of OI. Since then, an additional putative collagen chaperone complex, composed of FKBP10 (also known as FKBP65) and SERPINH1 (also known as HSP47), has also been shown to be mutated in recessive OI. Here, we describe five families with OI-like bone fragility in association with congenital contractures who all had FKBP10 mutations. Given the previous mapping of Bruck syndrome type 1 to the chromosomal region containing FKBP10, we conclude that FKBP10 mutations are the cause of Bruck syndrome type 1. (c) 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCerebrospinal fluid pterins and folates in Aicardi-Goutières syndrome: A new phenotype
Blau, N.; Bonafé, L.; Krägeloh-Mann, I. et al

in Neurology (2003), 61(5), 642-647

Objective: To describe three unrelated children with a distinctive variant of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) characterized by microcephaly, severe mental and motor retardation, dyskinesia or spasticity ... [more ▼]

Objective: To describe three unrelated children with a distinctive variant of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) characterized by microcephaly, severe mental and motor retardation, dyskinesia or spasticity, and occasional seizures. Results: Neuroimaging showed bilateral calcification of basal ganglia and white matter. CSF glucose, protein, cell count, and interferon alpha were normal. Abnormal CSF findings included extremely high neopterin (293 to 814 nmol/L; normal 12 to 30 nmol/L) and biopterin (226 to 416 nmol/L; normal 15 to 40 nmol/L) combined with lowered 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (23 to 48 nmol/L; normal 64 to 182 nmol/L) concentrations in two patients. The absence of pleocytosis and normal CSF interferon alpha was a characteristic finding compared to the classic AGS syndrome. Genetic and enzymatic tests excluded disorders of tetrahydrobiopterin metabolism, including mutation analysis of GTP cyclohydrolase feed-back regulatory protein. CSF investigations in three patients with classic AGS also showed increased pterins and partially lowered folate levels. Conclusions: Intrathecal overproduction of pterins is the first biochemical abnormality identified in patients with AGS variants. Long-term substitution with folinic acid (2-4 mg/kg/day) resulted in substantial clinical recovery with normalization of CSF folates and pterins in one patient and clinical improvement in another. The underlying defect remains unknown. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)