References of "Bolton, S. J"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfrared observations of Jovian aurora from Juno's first orbits: Main oval and satellite footprints
Mura, A.; Adriani, A.; Altieri, F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(11), 5308-5316

The Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) is an imager/spectrometer on board NASA/Juno mission for the study of the Jovian aurorae. The first results of JIRAM's imager channel observations of the H3 ... [more ▼]

The Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) is an imager/spectrometer on board NASA/Juno mission for the study of the Jovian aurorae. The first results of JIRAM's imager channel observations of the H3 + infrared emission, collected around the first Juno perijove, provide excellent spatial and temporal distribution of the Jovian aurorae, and show the morphology of the main ovals, the polar regions, and the footprints of Io, Europa and Ganymede. The extended Io “tail” persists for ~3 h after the passage of the satellite flux tube. Multi-arc structures of varied spatial extent appear in both main auroral ovals. Inside the main ovals, intense, localized emissions are observed. In the southern aurora, an evident circular region of strong depletion of H3 + emissions is partially surrounded by an intense emission arc. The southern aurora is brighter than the north one in these observations. Similar, probably conjugate emission patterns are distinguishable in both polar regions. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreliminary JIRAM results from Juno polar observations: 3. Evidence of diffuse methane presence in the Jupiter auroral regions
Moriconi, M. L.; Adriani, A.; Dinelli, B. M. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(10), 4641-4648

Throughout the first orbit of the NASA Juno mission around Jupiter, the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) targeted the northern and southern polar regions several times. The analyses of the acquired ... [more ▼]

Throughout the first orbit of the NASA Juno mission around Jupiter, the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) targeted the northern and southern polar regions several times. The analyses of the acquired images and spectra confirmed a significant presence of methane (CH4) near both poles through its 3.3 μm emission overlapping the H3 + auroral feature at 3.31 μm. Neither acetylene (C2H2) nor ethane (C2H6) have been observed so far. The analysis method, developed for the retrieval of H3 + temperature and abundances and applied to the JIRAM-measured spectra, has enabled an estimate of the effective temperature for methane peak emission and the distribution of its spectral contribution in the polar regions. The enhanced methane inside the auroral oval regions in the two hemispheres at different longitude suggests an excitation mechanism driven by energized particle precipitation from the magnetosphere. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreliminary JIRAM results from Juno polar observations: 1. Methodology and analysis applied to the Jovian northern polar region
Dinelli, B. M.; Fabiano, F.; Adriani, A. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017), 44(10), 4625-4632

During the first orbit around Jupiter of the NASA/Juno mission, the Jovian Auroral Infrared Mapper (JIRAM) instrument observed the auroral regions with a large number of measurements. The measured spectra ... [more ▼]

During the first orbit around Jupiter of the NASA/Juno mission, the Jovian Auroral Infrared Mapper (JIRAM) instrument observed the auroral regions with a large number of measurements. The measured spectra show both the emission of the H3+ ion and of methane in the 3–4 μm spectral region. In this paper we describe the analysis method developed to retrieve temperature and column density (CD) of the H3+ ion from JIRAM spectra in the northern auroral region. The high spatial resolution of JIRAM shows an asymmetric aurora, with CD and temperature ovals not superimposed and not exactly located where models and previous observations suggested. On the main oval averaged H3+ CDs span between 1.8 × 1012 cm−2 and 2.8 × 1012 cm−2, while the retrieved temperatures show values between 800 and 950 K. JIRAM indicates a complex relationship among H3+ CDs and temperatures on the Jupiter northern aurora. ©2017. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailJupiter's magnetosphere and aurorae observed by the Juno spacecraft during its first polar orbits
Connerney, J. E. P.; Adriani, A.; Allegrini, F. et al

in Science (2017), 356(6340), 826--832

Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in our solar system. NASA\textquoterights Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on 4 July 2016 and made its first close pass on 27 August 2016. Bolton et al ... [more ▼]

Jupiter is the largest and most massive planet in our solar system. NASA\textquoterights Juno spacecraft arrived at Jupiter on 4 July 2016 and made its first close pass on 27 August 2016. Bolton et al. present results from Juno\textquoterights flight just above the cloud tops, including images of weather in the polar regions and measurements of the magnetic and gravitational fields. Juno also used microwaves to peer below the visible surface, spotting gas welling up from the deep interior. Connerney et al. measured Jupiter\textquoterights aurorae and plasma environment, both as Juno approached the planet and during its first close orbit.Science, this issue p. 821, p. 826The Juno spacecraft acquired direct observations of the jovian magnetosphere and auroral emissions from a vantage point above the poles. Juno\textquoterights capture orbit spanned the jovian magnetosphere from bow shock to the planet, providing magnetic field, charged particle, and wave phenomena context for Juno\textquoterights passage over the poles and traverse of Jupiter\textquoterights hazardous inner radiation belts. Juno\textquoterights energetic particle and plasma detectors measured electrons precipitating in the polar regions, exciting intense aurorae, observed simultaneously by the ultraviolet and infrared imaging spectrographs. Juno transited beneath the most intense parts of the radiation belts, passed about 4000 kilometers above the cloud tops at closest approach, well inside the jovian rings, and recorded the electrical signatures of high-velocity impacts with small particles as it traversed the equator. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResponse of Jupiter's auroras to conditions in the interplanetary medium as measured by the Hubble Space Telescope and Juno
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bagenal, F. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the ... [more ▼]

We present the first comparison of Jupiter's auroral morphology with an extended, continuous and complete set of near-Jupiter interplanetary data, revealing the response of Jupiter's auroras to the interplanetary conditions. We show that for ∼1-3 days following compression region onset the planet's main emission brightened. A duskside poleward region also brightened during compressions, as well as during shallow rarefaction conditions at the start of the program. The power emitted from the noon active region did not exhibit dependence on any interplanetary parameter, though the morphology typically differed between rarefactions and compressions. The auroras equatorward of the main emission brightened over ∼10 days following an interval of increased volcanic activity on Io. These results show that the dependence of Jupiter's magnetosphere and auroras on the interplanetary conditions are more diverse than previously thought. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailJuno-UVS Approach Observations of Jupiter's Auroras
Gladstone, G. R.; Versteeg, M. H.; Greathouse, T. K. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2017)

Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's aurora obtained during approach are presented. Prior to the bow-shock crossing on 24 June 2016, the Juno approach provided a rare opportunity to correlate local solar ... [more ▼]

Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's aurora obtained during approach are presented. Prior to the bow-shock crossing on 24 June 2016, the Juno approach provided a rare opportunity to correlate local solar wind conditions with Jovian auroral emissions. Some of Jupiter's auroral emissions are expected to be controlled or modified by local solar wind conditions. Here we compare synoptic Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's auroral emissions, acquired during 3-29 June 2016, with in situ solar wind observations, and related Jupiter observations from Earth. Four large auroral brightening events are evident in the synoptic data, in which the total emitted auroral power increases by a factor of 3-4 for a few hours. Only one of these brightening events correlates well with large transient increases in solar wind ram pressure. The brightening events which are not associated with the solar wind generally have a rise time of ~2 hours and a decay time of ~5 hours. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Juno Mission
Bolton, S. J.; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULg; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Barbieri, Cesare; Coradini, Marcello; Chakrabarti, Supriya (Eds.) et al Proceedings IAU Symposium No. 269. "Galileo's Medicean Moons: their impact on 400 years of discovery" (2010, November 03)

Juno is the next NASA New Frontiers mission which will launch in August 2011. The mission is a solar powered spacecraft scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in 2016 and be placed into polar orbit around Jupiter ... [more ▼]

Juno is the next NASA New Frontiers mission which will launch in August 2011. The mission is a solar powered spacecraft scheduled to arrive at Jupiter in 2016 and be placed into polar orbit around Jupiter. The goal of the Juno mission is to explore the origin and evolution of the planet Jupiter. Juno's science themes include (1) origin, (2) interior structure, (3) atmospheric composition and dynamics, and (4) polar magnetosphere and aurora. A total of nine instruments on-board provide specific measurements designed to investigate Juno's science themes. The primary objective of investigating the origin of Jupiter includes 1) determine Jupiter's internal mass distribution by measuring gravity with Doppler tracking, 2) determine the nature of its internal dynamo by measuring its magnetic fields with a magnetometer, and 3) determine the deep composition (in particular the global water abundance) and dynamics of the sub-cloud atmosphere around Jupiter, by measuring its thermal microwave emission. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (2 ULg)
See detailThe Jovian Aurora: Implications of Multiwavelength Auroral Spectra for Auroral Particle Identity and Auroral Microphysics
Waite, J. H.; Gladstone, G. R.; Bolton, S. J. et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (1998, September 01)

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on Jupiter's upper ... [more ▼]

Remote sensing of Jupiter's aurora from x-ray to radio wavelengths has revealed much about the nature of the jovian aurora and about the impact of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling on Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Both energetic heavy ions and electrons energized in the outer magnetosphere contribute to the auroral excitation, as indicated by the combination of x-ray and ultraviolet observations. Imaging with the HST in the ultraviolet and with the IRTF at infrared wavelengths reveals several distinct regions of interaction: 1) a dusk sector where turbulent auroral patterns extend well into the polar cap; 2) a morning sector generally characterized by a single spatially confined auroral arc originating in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter; 3) diffuse emissions associated with the Io plasma torus; and 4) a distinct region associated with the Io Flux Tube footprint. Ultraviolet spectroscopy has provided important information about the thermal structure of the upper atmosphere and altitude distribution of the auroral particle energy deposition, while Lyman alpha line profiles offer clues to the nature of thermospheric dynamical effects. Galileo observations at visible wavelengths on the nightside have provided a new view of the jovian aurora with unprecedented spatial information. Infrared observations have added much to the understanding of thermal structure and morphology and may hold the key to understanding the role of Joule heating. Radio observations imply that energetic particle precipitation extends to low latitudes, a result that has been corroborated at x-ray wavelengths. Multispectral observations of jovian auroral emissions will be discussed within a theoretical/modeling framework that serves to provide some insight into magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Particular emphasis will be placed on the use of auroral spectra to identify incident energetic particles and their energy spectra as a means of elucidating the microphysics of auroral processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (1 ULg)