References of "Boccaccini, Aldo R"
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See detailAC vs. DC electrophoretic deposition of hydroxyapatite on titanium
Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj ULg; Chen, Qiang; Closset, Raphaël ULg et al

in Journal of the European Ceramic Society (2013), 33(13-14), 27152721

In this study, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder on titanium plate was performed using butanol as solvent under direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) fields. The ... [more ▼]

In this study, electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder on titanium plate was performed using butanol as solvent under direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) fields. The zeta potential of the suspensions was measured to define their stability and the charge on the particles. Coating thickness was varied by adjusting the voltage and time of deposition. Surface morphology and cross section thickness were studied using scanning electron microscopy and image analysis software. Surface crack density was calculated from the micrographs. The results showed that the samples of similar thickness have higher grain density when coated using AC as compared to DC EPD. This facile but novel test proves the capability of AC-EPD to attain denser and uniform HA coatings from non-aqueous medium. [less ▲]

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See detailPoly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) foams with TiO2 nanoparticles and PDLLA/TiO2-Bioglass (R) foam composites for tissue engineering scaffolds
Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Blaker, Jonny J.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Journal of Materials Science (2006), 41(13), 3999-4008

Porous poly(D,L-lactide) PDLLA foams containing 0, 5 and 20 wt% of TiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated and characterised. The addition of Bioglassg particles was also studied in a composite containing 5 wt ... [more ▼]

Porous poly(D,L-lactide) PDLLA foams containing 0, 5 and 20 wt% of TiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated and characterised. The addition of Bioglassg particles was also studied in a composite containing 5 wt% of Bioglass(R) particles and 20 wt% of TiO2 nanoparticles. The microstructure of the four different foam types was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their mechanical properties assessed by quasi-static compression testing. The in vitro behaviour of the foams was studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) at three different time points: 3, 21 and 28 days. The degradation of the samples was characterised quantitatively by measuring the water absorption and weight loss as a function of immersion time in SBE The bioactivity of the foams was characterised by observing hydroxyapatite (HA) formation after 21 days of immersion in SBF using SEM and confirmed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that the amount of HA was dependent on the distribution of TiO2 nanoparticles and on the presence of Bioglassg in the foam samples. (c) 2006 Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo analysis of macroporous biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds containing bioactive glass
Day, Richard M; Maquet, Véronique; Boccaccini, Aldo R. et al

in Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Part A (2005), 75A(4), 778-787

Recent studies have demonstrated the angiogenic potential of 45S5 Bioglass (R). However, it is not known whether the angiogenic properties of Bioglass (R) remain when the bioactive glass particles are ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated the angiogenic potential of 45S5 Bioglass (R). However, it is not known whether the angiogenic properties of Bioglass (R) remain when the bioactive glass particles are incorporated into polymer composites. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the angiogenic properties of 45S5 Bioglass (R) particles incorporated into biodegradable polymer composites. In vitro studies demonstrated that fibroblasts Cultured on discs consisting of specific quantities of Bioglass (R) particles mixed into poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) secreted significantly increased quantities of vascular endothelial growth factor. The optimal quantity of Bioglass (R) particles determined from the in vitro experiments was incorporated into three-dimensional macroporous poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) foam scaffolds. The foam scaffolds were fabricated using either compression molding or thermally induced phase separation processes. The foams were implanted subcutaneously into mice for periods Of Lip to 6 weeks. Histological assessment was used to determine the area of granulation tissue around the foams, and the number of blood vessels within the granulation tissue was counted. The presence of Bioglass (R) particles in the foams produced a sustained increase in the area of granulation tissue surrounding the foams. The number of blood vessels surrounding the neat foams was reduced after 2 weeks of implantation; however, compression-molded foams containing Bioglass (R) after 4 and 6 weeks of implantation had significant]), more blood vessels surrounding the foams compared with foams containing no Bioglass (R) at the same time points. These results indicate that composite polymer foam scaffolds containing Bioglass (R) particles retain granulation tissue and blood vessels surrounding the implanted foams. The use of this polymer composite for tissue engineering scaffolds might provide a novel approach for ensuring adequate vascular Supply to the implanted device. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanical properties of highly porous PDLLA/Bioglass (R) composite foams as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering
Blaker, Jonny J.; Maquet, Véronique; Jérôme, Robert ULg et al

in Acta Biomaterialia (2005), 1(6), 643-652

This study developed highly porous degradable composites as potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. These scaffolds consisted of poly-d,l-lactic acid filled with 2 and 15 vol.% of 45S5 Bioglass® ... [more ▼]

This study developed highly porous degradable composites as potential scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. These scaffolds consisted of poly-d,l-lactic acid filled with 2 and 15 vol.% of 45S5 Bioglass® particles and were produced via thermally induced solid–liquid phase separation and subsequent solvent sublimation. The scaffolds had a bimodal and anisotropic pore structure, with tubular macro-pores of 100 μm in diameter, and with interconnected micro-pores of 10–50 μm in diameter. Quasi-static and thermal dynamic mechanical analysis carried out in compression along with thermogravimetric analysis was used to investigate the effect of Bioglass® on the properties of the foams. Quasi-static compression testing demonstrated mechanical anisotropy concomitant with the direction of the macro-pores. An analytical modelling approach was applied, which demonstrated that the presence of Bioglass® did not significantly alter the porous architecture of these foams and reflected the mechanical anisotropy which was congruent with the scanning electron microscopy investigation. This study found that the Ishai–Cohen and Gibson–Ashby models can be combined to predict the compressive modulus of the composite foams. The modulus and density of these complex foams are related by a power-law function with an exponent between 2 and 3. [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the connectivity properties of Bioglass®-filled polylactide foam scaffolds by image analysis and impedance spectroscopy
Blacher, Silvia ULg; Maquet, Véronique; Jérôme, Robert ULg et al

in Acta Biomaterialia (2005), 1(5), 565-574

The porous structure of two series of poly(d,l-lactide)/Bioglass® composite foams prepared by thermal-induced phase separation was investigated by image analysis and impedance spectroscopy. Polymer ... [more ▼]

The porous structure of two series of poly(d,l-lactide)/Bioglass® composite foams prepared by thermal-induced phase separation was investigated by image analysis and impedance spectroscopy. Polymer solutions of either low or high molecular weight containing different concentrations (up to 50 wt.%) of Bioglass® particles of mean particle size d < 5 µm were studied. The morphology of both macro- and micropores was studied by scanning electron microscopy and image analysis of both neat and composite foams (containing 10-50 wt.% Bioglass®). The pore connectivity of both neat polymer and composite foams was characterized by impedance spectroscopy in relation with their transport properties. The influence of the foam composition (i.e., polymer molecular weight and concentration of Bioglass®) on pore microstructure was studied using these non-destructive methods. It was found that addition of Bioglass® particles has a pronounced effect on pore orientation, leading to increasing loss of order of pore structure, especially for low-molecular weight PDLLA foams. [less ▲]

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See detailWetting of bioactive glass surfaces by poly(alpha-hydroxyacid) melts: interaction between Bioglass (R) and biodegradable polymers
Blaker, Jonny J.; Maquet, Véronique; Boccaccini, Aldo R. et al

in e-Polymers (2005), 23

The interfacial characteristics between bioactive glass (4555 Bioglass(R)) surfaces and poly(alpha-hydroxyacid) melts have been assessed by direct wetting measurements. In particular, the wettability of ... [more ▼]

The interfacial characteristics between bioactive glass (4555 Bioglass(R)) surfaces and poly(alpha-hydroxyacid) melts have been assessed by direct wetting measurements. In particular, the wettability of Bioglass(R) powder by poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) and poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was assessed by imbibition measurements. Additionally, the equilibrium contact angles of PDLLA and PLGA melts on a sintered Bioglass(R) surface were measured. The surface energy of the bioactive glass and the polymers was determined from contact angles measured using various test liquids on PDLLA, PLGA and Bioglass(R) solid substrates. There are sufficient adhesive interactions between the polymers and Bioglass(R). A simple heat treatment of the bioactive glass in an inert gas atmosphere leads to an improved wetting behaviour, indicating increased adhesive interactions. Scanning electron micrographs of the polymer+Bioglass(R) composites formed by polymer penetration into the powder bed show the formation of a 'good quality' interface. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparation and characterisation of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA/Bioglass((R)) composite tubular foam scaffolds for tissue engineering applications
Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Blaker, Jonny J.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Materials Science and Engineering C: Biomimetic and Supramolecular Systems (2005), 25(1), 23-31

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and PLGA/Bioglass(R) foams of tubular shape have been prepared with a 1 wt% 45S5 Bioglass(R) content. Porous membranes with varying thickness and porosity were fabricated ... [more ▼]

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) and PLGA/Bioglass(R) foams of tubular shape have been prepared with a 1 wt% 45S5 Bioglass(R) content. Porous membranes with varying thickness and porosity were fabricated via a thermally induced phase separation process from which tubes of controlled diameter and wall thickness in the range 1.5-3 mm were produced. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that the structure of the tubular foams consisted of radially oriented and highly interconnected pores with two distinct pore sizes, i.e. macropores similar to100-mum average diameter and interconnected micropores of 10-50-mum diameter. Foams with Bioglass(R) inclusions showed similarly well-defined tubular and interconnected pore morphology. Cell culture studies using mouse fibroblasts (L929) were conducted to assess the biocompatibility of the scaffolds in vitro. L929 fibroblasts cultured in medium that was pre-conditioned by incubating with PLGA tubes containing Bioglass(R) had a significant reduction in cell proliferation compared with fibroblasts grown in unconditioned medium (P < 0.0001). The PLGA and PLGA/Bioglass(R) tubular foams developed here are candidate materials for soft-tissue engineering scaffolds. holding promise for the regeneration of tissues requiring a tubular shape scaffold. such as intestine. trachea and blood vessels. [less ▲]

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See detailPorous poly(α-hydroxyacid)/Bioglass® composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. I: preparation and in vitro characterisation
Maquet, Véronique; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Pravata, Laurent et al

in Biomaterials (2004), 25(18), 4185-4194

Highly porous composites scaffolds of poly-D,L-lactide (PDLLA) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) containing different amounts (10, 25 and 50wt%) of bioactive glass (45S5 bioglass®) were prepared by ... [more ▼]

Highly porous composites scaffolds of poly-D,L-lactide (PDLLA) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) containing different amounts (10, 25 and 50wt%) of bioactive glass (45S5 bioglass®) were prepared by thermally induced solid-liquid phase separation (TIPS) and subsequent solvent sublimation. The addition of increasing amounts of bioglass® into the polymer foams decreased the pore volume. Conversely, the mechanical properties of the polymer materials were improved. The composites were incubated in phosphate buffer saline at 37°C to study the in vitro degradation of the polymer by measurement of water absorption, weight loss as well as changes in the average molecular weight of the polymer and in the pH of the incubation medium as a function of the incubation time. The addition of bioglass®to polymer foams increased the water absorption and weight loss compared to neat polymer foams. However, the polymer molecular weight, determined by size exclusion chromatography, was found to decrease more rapidly and to a larger extent in absence of bioglass®. The presence of the bioactive filler was therefore found to delay the degradation rate of the polymer as compared to the neat polymer foams. Formation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of composites, as an indication of their bioactivity, was recorded by EDXA, X-ray diffractometry and confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo characterisation of a novel bioresorbable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) tubular foam scaffold for tissue engineering applications
Day, Richard M; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2004), 15(6), 729-734

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase ... [more ▼]

Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) foams of tubular shape were assessed for their use as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Porous membranes were fabricated by a thermally induced phase separation process of PLGA solutions in dimethylcarbonate. The parameters investigated were the PLGA concentration and the casting volume of solution. Membranes produced from 5 wt/v % polymer solutions and a 6 ml casting volume of polymer solution were selected for fabricating tubes of 3 mm diameter, 20 mm length and a nominal wall thickness of 1.5 mm. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the tubularfoams consisted of radially oriented and highly interconnected pores with a large size distribution (50-300 µm). Selected tubes were implanted subcutaneously into adult male Lewis rats. Although the lumen of the tubes collapsed within one week of implantation, histological examination of the implanted scaffolds revealed that the foam tubes were well tolerated. Cellular infiltration into the foams, consisting mainly of fibrovascular tissue, was evident after two weeks and complete within eight weeks of implantation. The polymer was still evident in the scaffolds after eight weeks of implantation. The results from this study demonstrate that the PLGA tubular foams may be useful as soft-tissue engineering scaffolds with modification holding promise for the regeneration of tissues requiring a tubular shape scaffold such as intestine. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparation, characterization, and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable and bioactive composites based on Bioglass (R)-filled polylactide foams
Maquet, Véronique; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Pravata, Laurent et al

in Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Part A (2003), 66A(2), 335-346

Highly porous poly(D,L-lactide)/Bioglass composites scaffolds were prepared by thermally induced phase separation process of polymer solutions and subsequent solvent sublimation. A series of composite ... [more ▼]

Highly porous poly(D,L-lactide)/Bioglass composites scaffolds were prepared by thermally induced phase separation process of polymer solutions and subsequent solvent sublimation. A series of composite foams with different polymer/Bioglass weight ratios was prepared to study the influence of Bioglass content on the foam characteristics such as porous structure, density, and pore volume. The pore volume was decreased from 9.5 to 5.7 cm(3)/g when the Bioglass content was increased up to 40 wt %, but the overall pore morphology was not affected very much by changing the polymer/glass composition ratio. The composites foams were then incubated in phosphate-buffered saline at 37 degrees C to study the in vitro degradation of the polymer and to detect hydroxyapatite (HA) formation as an indication of their bioactivity. The addition of Bioglass to polymer foams increased the water absorption and weight loss as compared with pure polymer foams. However, the polymer molecular weight, determined by size exclusion chromatography, was found to decrease more rapidly and to a larger extent in absence of Bioglass. This delayed degradation rate in the composite foams was probably caused by the dissolution of alkaline ions from the Bioglass, resulting in a buffering effect of the incubation medium. After incubation for 7 days, HA was detected by X-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy and confirmed by environmental scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The porous composites developed here are promising materials for bone regeneration applications because the formation of HA on the surface of the pore walls should provide good environment for the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts and osteoprogenitor cells. [less ▲]

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See detailBioresorbable and bioactive composite materials based on polylactide foams filled with and coated by Bioglass (R) particles for tissue engineering applications
Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Notingher, I.; Maquet, Véronique et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2003), 14(5), 443-450

Poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams and bioactive glass (Bioglass®) particles were used to form bioresorbable and bioactive composite scaffolds for applications in bone tissue engineering. A thermally induced ... [more ▼]

Poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams and bioactive glass (Bioglass®) particles were used to form bioresorbable and bioactive composite scaffolds for applications in bone tissue engineering. A thermally induced phase separation process was applied to prepare highly porous PDLLA foams filled with 10wt% Bioglass® particles. Stable and homogeneous layers of Bioglass® particles on the surface of the PDLLA/Bioglass® composite foams as well as infiltration of Bioglass® particles throughout the porous network were achieved using a slurry-dipping technique. The quality of the bioactive glass coatings was reproducible in terms of thickness and microstructure. In vitro studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) were performed to study the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) on the surface of the PDLLA/Bioglass® composites, as an indication of the bioactivity of the materials. Formation of the HA layer after immersion in SBF was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The rate of HA formation in Bioglass®-coated samples was higher than that observed in non-coated samples. SEM analysis showed that the HA layer thickness rapidly increased with increasing time in SBF in the Bioglass®-coated samples. The high bioactivity of the developed composites suggests that the materials are attractive for use as bioactive, resorbable scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel bioresorbable and bioactive composites based on bioactive glass and polylactide foams for bone tissue engineering
Roether, J. A.; Gough, J. E.; Boccaccini, Aldo R. et al

in Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine (2002), 13(12), 1207-1214

Bioresorbable and bioactive tissue engineering scaffolds based on bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass®) particles and macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams were fabricated. A slurry dipping technique in ... [more ▼]

Bioresorbable and bioactive tissue engineering scaffolds based on bioactive glass (45S5 Bioglass®) particles and macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams were fabricated. A slurry dipping technique in conjunction with pretreatment in ethanol was used to achieve reproducible and well adhering bioactive glass coatings of uniform thickness on the internal and external surfaces of the foams. In vitro studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) demonstrated rapid hydroxyapatite (HA) formation on the surface of the composites, indicating their bioactivity. For comparison, composite foams containing Bioglass® particles as filler for the polymer matrix (in concentration of up to 40 wt%) were prepared by freeze-drying, enabling homogenous glass particle distribution in the polymer matrix. The formation of HA on the composite surfaces after immersion in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) was investigated to confirm the bioactivity of the composites. Human osteoblasts (HOBs) were seeded onto as-fabricated PDLLA foams and onto PDLLA foams coated with Bioglass® particles to determine early cell attachment and spreading. Cells were observed to attach and spread on all surfaces after the first 90 min in culture. The results of this study indicate that the fabricated composite materials have potential as scaffolds for guided bone regeneration. (C) 2002 Kluwer Academic Publishers. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and in vitro characterisation of novel bioresorbable and bioactive composite materials based on polylactide foams and Bioglass (R) for tissue engineering applications
Roether, J. A.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Hench, L. L. et al

in Biomaterials (2002), 23(18), 3871-3878

Bioactive and bioresorbable composite materials were fabricated using macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams coated with and impregnated by bioactive glass (Bioglass®) particles. Stable and ... [more ▼]

Bioactive and bioresorbable composite materials were fabricated using macroporous poly(DL-lactide) (PDLLA) foams coated with and impregnated by bioactive glass (Bioglass®) particles. Stable and homogeneous Bioglasss coatings on the surface of PDLLA foams as well as infiltration of Bioglass® particles throughout the porous network were achieved using a slurry-dipping technique in conjunction with pre-treatment of the foams in ethanol. The quality of the bioactive glass coatings was reproducible in terms of thickness and microstructure. Additionally, electrophoretic deposition was investigated as an alternative method for the fabrication of PDLLA foam/Bioglass® composite materials. In vitro studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) were performed to study the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA) on the surface of PDLLA/Bioglass® composites. SEM analysis showed that the HA layer thickness rapidly increased with increasing time in SBF. The high bioactivity of the PDLLA foam/Bioglasss composites indicates the potential of the materials for use as bioactive, resorbable scaffolds in bone tissue engineering. [less ▲]

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