References of "Bisteau, Emmanuelle"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTesting coexistence of extinction debt and colonization credit in fragmented calcareous grasslands with complex historical dynamics
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Cristofoli, Sara; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

in Landscape Ecology (2011), 26

Calcareous grasslands are among the most species-rich ecosystems in temperate countries. However, these ecosystems have suffered from fragmentation and destruction during the last century. We studied the ... [more ▼]

Calcareous grasslands are among the most species-rich ecosystems in temperate countries. However, these ecosystems have suffered from fragmentation and destruction during the last century. We studied the response of calcareous grassland plant diversity to landscape changes in Belgium. Results indicated that high area loss (since 1965) old habitat patches exhibited an extinction debt inverse to low area loss old habitat patches, little depending on the area loss threshold (60%, 70%, 80% or 90%) considered for the distinction between the high and low area loss patches. However, human activities also created new habitat patches in the landscape and therefore provided opportunities for calcareous grassland plant species to colonize new habitats. This also provided opportunities to study species colonization abilities in the context of habitat restoration. We analyzed species richness in new patches compared to old patches in order to detect colonization credit. We detected the presence of a colonization credit in new patches when using high loss old patches (area loss>80%, exhibiting an extinction debt) or all old patches as a reference. However, when the reference was low loss old patches alone (area loss<80%, less likely to exhibit an extinction debt), no colonization credit was detected. In addition, species composition was similar between new patches and old patches. These results are encouraging for restoration programs. However, the results indicated that the presence of an extinction debt in reference habitats could lead to inaccurate conclusions in restoration monitoring. Therefore, extinction debt should be considered when choosing reference habitats to evaluate restoration success. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlant species extinction debt in a temperate biodiversity hotspot: community, species and functional traits approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

in Biological Conservation (2011), 144

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the ... [more ▼]

Destruction and fragmentation of (semi-) natural habitats are considered the main causes of biodiversity loss worldwide. Plant species may exhibit a slow response to fragmentation, resulting in the development of an extinction debt in fragmented plant communities. The detection of extinction debt is of primary importance in habitat conservation strategies. We applied two different approaches proposed in the literature to identify extinction debt in Southeast Belgium calcareous grasslands. The first method compared species richness between stable and fragmented habitat patches. The second explored correlations between current species richness and current and past landscape configurations using multiple regression analyses. We subsequently examined results generated by both methods. In addition, we proposed techniques to identify species that are more likely to support extinction debt and associated functional traits. We estimated a respective extinction debt of approximately 28% and 35% of the total and specialist species richness. Similar results were obtained from both methods. We identified 15 threatened specialist species under the current landscape configuration. It is likely the landscape configuration no longer supports the species habitat requirements. We demonstrated that non-clonal species are most threatened, as well as taxa that cannot persist in degraded habitats and form only sparsely distributed populations. We discussed our results in light of other studies in similar habitats, and the overall implications for habitat conservation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRapid restoration of a species-rich ecosystem assessed from soil and vegetation indicators: the case of calcareous grasslands restored from forest stands
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bottin, Gaëtan; Delescaille, Louis-Marie et al

in Ecological Indicators (2011), 11

Calcareous grasslands have long been recognized as biodiversity hotspots in Europe. However, in recent decades these ecosystems have seen rapid decline. In Belgium, more than 100 ha of calcareous ... [more ▼]

Calcareous grasslands have long been recognized as biodiversity hotspots in Europe. However, in recent decades these ecosystems have seen rapid decline. In Belgium, more than 100 ha of calcareous grasslands have been restored from oak coppices and pine forests since the 1990s. The aim of the present study was to provide a quantitative assessment of the success of these restoration efforts, using two sets of indicators: one related to soil conditions, the other related to vascular plant communities. Soil conditions were evaluated by comparing soil samples from pre-restoration forest stands, restored grasslands (3 age classes: 2-4 years; 5-8 years, 10-15 years) and reference grasslands. The analysis revealed no significant differences in soil N, P and K contents between pre-restoration forests and restored and reference grasslands. We observed a decrease in the mineralization rate indicators in both pre-restoration forests and recent grassland restorations, which was resorbed in older restorations. Floristic surveys revealed that plant species composition of older restorations was most like reference grasslands. However, some differences in species composition persisted after 15 years. Moreover, a few rare species did not colonise restored grasslands despite a close seed source. Non-recolonization by a set of species expected on calcareous grasslands may be due to dispersal limitation and higher cover by native invasive grasses in restored parcels. These results were discussed in term of implications for management. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (37 ULg)
See detailExtinction debt and colonization credit: When both phenomena are integrated
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Cristofoli, Sara; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

Conference (2010)

Calcareous grasslands are among the most species-rich ecosystems in temperate countries. These ecosystems suffered a high fragmentation process during the last century. Fragmentation can lead to the ... [more ▼]

Calcareous grasslands are among the most species-rich ecosystems in temperate countries. These ecosystems suffered a high fragmentation process during the last century. Fragmentation can lead to the creation of an extinction debt in remaining habitat patches. In our study site, it was shown in a previous study that Fragmented habitat patches (area loss since 1965 >80%) exhibited an extinction debt in comparison to Stable habitat patches (area loss since 1965 <80%). However, human activities also created new habitat patches in the landscape and provided therefore opportunities for calcareous grassland plant species to colonize new sites. They also provide opportunities for studying species colonization abilities in the context of habitat restoration. We analyzed species richness in these new patches in comparison to old patches in order to detect colonization credit. When taking as reference Fragmented patches (that exhibit an extinction debt) or all old patches (Fragmented and Stable), we concluded to the occurrence of a colonization credit in New patches. However, when the reference is Stable patches (the less likely to exhibit an extinction debt) alone, no colonization credit could be detected. Moreover, correspondence analysis revealed that New patches were similar to old patches in term of species composition. These results are encouraging for restoration programs. They also showed that the presence of an extinction debt in reference habitats can lead to mistaken conclusion in restoration monitoring. Extinction debt occurrence should be taken into account in the choice of reference habitats for evaluation of restoration success. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (10 ULg)
See detailPlant species extinction debt in a biodiversity hotspot: community and species approaches
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

Conference (2009, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailL'inventaire des sites de grand intérêt biologique en Région wallonne.
Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Baugnée, Jean-Yves; Dufrêne, Marc ULg et al

in Forêt Wallonne (2009), 103

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (2 ULg)
See detailDette d'extinction dans un hotspot de biodiversité: approches communauté et espèces
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bisteau, Emmanuelle; Cristofoli, Sara et al

Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (5 ULg)
See detailRestoration assessment of calcareous grasslands in Belgium : soil conditions and floristic diversity
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bottin, Gaëtan; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (4 ULg)
See detailEvaluation des restaurations de pelouses calcicoles en Belgique en termes de structure spatiale et de diversité botanique
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bottin, Gaëtan; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (7 ULg)
See detailRestoration assessment of calcareous grasslands in Belgium : spatial structure and plant species diversity
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bottin, Gaëtan; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

Poster (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULg)
See detailEVALUATION DES RESTAURATIONS DE PELOUSES CALCICOLES EN BELGIQUE : STRUCTURE SPATIALE, DIVERSITE BOTANIQUE ET CONDITIONS DE SOL
Piqueray, Julien ULg; Bottin, Gaëtan; Bisteau, Emmanuelle et al

Conference (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (7 ULg)