References of "Bindelle, Jérôme"
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See detailAdding mucins to an in vitro batch fermentation model of the large intestine induces changes in microbial population isolated from porcine feces depending on the substrate
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in FEMS Microbiology Ecology (in press)

Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine showed that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosa layers to ... [more ▼]

Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine showed that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosa layers to increase their activity. This study investigates whether this dependence on mucus is substrate-dependent and to which extend other genera are impacted by the presence of mucus. Inulin and cellulose were fermented in vitro by a fecal inoculum from pig in the presence or not of mucin-beads in order to compare fermentation patterns and bacterial communities. Mucins increased final gas production with inulin and shifted short-chain fatty acids molar ratios (P<0.001). QPCR analyses revealed that Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. decreased with mucins, but Bacteroides spp. increased when inulin was fermented. A more in-depth community analysis indicated that the mucins increased Proteobacteria (0.55 vs. 0.25 %, P=0.013), Verrucomicrobia (5.25 vs. 0.03 %, P=0.032), Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Akkermansia spp.. Proteobacteria (5.67 vs. 0.55 %, P<0.001) and Lachnospiraceae (33 vs. 10.4 %) were promoted in the mucuscompared to the broth, while Ruminococcaceae decreased. The introduction of mucins affected many microbial genera and fermentation patterns, but from PCA results, the impact of mucus was independent from the fermentation substrate. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of shrubs and trees in intensive ruminant systems in temperate areas
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Ramìrez-Restrepo, Carlos Alberto; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

Conference (2016, January)

Using shrubs and trees as forage for ruminants is common in extensive production systems in the tropics, as well as the Mediterranean region and mountain areas. In temperate Europe, the intensification of ... [more ▼]

Using shrubs and trees as forage for ruminants is common in extensive production systems in the tropics, as well as the Mediterranean region and mountain areas. In temperate Europe, the intensification of agriculture led to a decline in the numbers of woody perennials on farmlands. A review of the potential uses of shrubs and trees in temperate intensive systems shows that this concept is rather recent. Few studies have been investigating the potential outputs and limitations of shrubs and trees forage in production systems, while in Belgium and other European countries, agro-environmental policies are promoting the establishment of hedgerows and woody strips that provide shelter to animals against variable climate conditions. Furthermore, it has been found that ruminant species browse the plants, or alternatively, the forage is harvested and fed fresh or preserved as hay, silages or pellets. In both cases, consequences on feed intake control, woody plant survival, dry matter (DM) production and forage quality in terms of crude protein content reduction have been documented. In addition, depending on the plant species and the preservation method, bio-active plant metabolites such as condensed tannins (CT) are also present in the range of less than 1 to more than 100 g/kg foliage DM. Overall, CT may reduce ruminal N degradation, methanogenesis and nematode parasites infestation, while enhancing microbial-protein synthesis, feed use efficiency and systemic animal physiology. Planting shrubs and trees into the agricultural landscape (i.e. silvopastoral system) can further improve biodiversity and environmental services. Nevertheless, agronomic practices, farm management or environmental policy limitations may reduce the use of this fodder resource. Therefore, although silvopastoral systems seem promising in temperate ruminant systems, the current knowledge to their introduction and efficient management need to be cautiously considered. [less ▲]

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See detailIntra-cultivar potential of Desmanthus spp. as a greenhouse gas mitigation strategy for tropical livestock pastoral systems
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Ramírez-Restrepo, Carlos Alberto; Singh, Sultan et al

Poster (2015, November)

Improved agricultural efficiency and reduction in the impacts of tropical livestock farming on habitat degradation require global approaches that enhance ruminant farming functionality in terms of feed ... [more ▼]

Improved agricultural efficiency and reduction in the impacts of tropical livestock farming on habitat degradation require global approaches that enhance ruminant farming functionality in terms of feed use efficiency, emissions and food security. This study evaluated the in vitro mitigation potential of the prostrate to erect, herbaceous Desmanthus spp. pasture legume adapted to semiarid clay soil land types in northern Australia. D. bicornutus, D. leptophyllus and D. virgatus were seasonally harvested from commercial plots by Agrimix Pty. Ltd. Samples of the legumes and the control Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana) using ruminal fluid from grazing Brahman (Bos indicus) steers were incubated in vitro (Ankom RF1 Technology) for 24, 48 and 72 h. Overall, the in vitro organic matter degradability (OMD) and methane production between Desmanthus species differed (P < 0.001). Compared to the control (0.656 ± 0.027 proportion of total OM) at 48 h of incubation, D. leptophyllus showed lower OMD (0.479 ± 0.016), while D. bicornutus (0.688 ± 0.016) and D. virgatus (0.619 ± 0.015) were different from each other, but similar to the control. Methane production (ml/g OM) was 15.7 ± 1.54, 3.7 ± 0.89, 12.0 ± 0.95 and 11.7 ± 0.95, respectively. It is suggested that the impact of these attributes may benefit household farmers in developing economies to expand productivity, improve livelihoods and meet the growing food consumption. Further analyses of the intra-cultivar characteristics of Desmanthus spp. will complement the design of sustainable and efficient interventions across tropical pastoral feeding systems, with a particular emphasis on large-scale grazing operations. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in biting characteristics recorded using the inertial measurement unit of a smartphone reflect differences in sward attributes
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

in Guarino, Marcella; Berckmans, Daniel (Eds.) Precision Livestock Farming '15 (2015, September)

Accurate monitoring of grazing activity at individual cow level would provide useful information to farmers to improve the management of their animals and pastures in intensive dairy systems. Pasture ... [more ▼]

Accurate monitoring of grazing activity at individual cow level would provide useful information to farmers to improve the management of their animals and pastures in intensive dairy systems. Pasture attributes, starting with sward height, influence grazing behaviour and bites characteristics. In an attempt to link sward height to an individual automated detection of biting behaviour, a series of recording sessions of 4×3 days were realized on a ryegrass pasture with two contrasting heights (5 and 15 cm) over the grazing season (from July to October) with 4 dry red-pied cows equipped with the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of a smartphone on a halter, recording acceleration data at 100Hz. The behaviours were video-recorded. The number of grazing bouts performed during grazing trends to increase when the grass is highest. Fourier transforms of acceleration data showed that grazing bouts were characterized by a distinctive acceleration peak which frequency ranged between 1.02Hz and 1.46Hz whatever the sward height. It corresponded to the uprooting of grass frequency in the biting movement when compared with the observation in the video recordings and it could be used to improve automated grazing behaviour detection and to remotely characterize bites. These results show that some bite characteristics are influenced by sward height and automated individual monitoring of grazing behaviour is possible. An extension of this methodology should allow analysing more deeply the grazing behaviour of cattle in order to determine number of bites and possibly to link it to biomass intake. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of inulin and wheat bran in the creep feed of neonatal piglets
Li, Bing ULg; Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 22)

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See detailIn vitro evaluation of fermentation characteristics of two types of insects, as potential novel protein feeds for pigs
POELAERT, Christine ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Despret, Xavier et al

in 13th International Symposium on Digestive Physiology of Pigs (2015, May)

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See detailImproving knowledge on Forest elephant’s ecophysiology (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) for better wildlife conservation
Ngama, Steeve ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Poster (2015, March 21)

Conservation of large wildlife species is currently a major issue in Africa. Protected areas dedicated for biodiversity conservation unfortunately do not suffice and conservation practices must be ... [more ▼]

Conservation of large wildlife species is currently a major issue in Africa. Protected areas dedicated for biodiversity conservation unfortunately do not suffice and conservation practices must be extended to man-used areas. But in those areas conservation actions are limited because of conflicts between human and wildlife especially due to damages on crops. The worst crop raiders known are elephants because they can destroy the yearly harvest of a field in a single visit. This threatens not only people livelihoods but also elephants themselves when angry farmers retaliate by shooting or trapping them. After decades of investigations crop raiding drivers related to elephants’ ecophysiology remain largely unknown. A pilot study was conducted between July and November 2014 in Monts de Cristal National Park (Gabon, central Africa) to have a first view on environmental drivers to crop raiding. While the presence of some fruiting trees around crop fields lead to more damages, high slopes discouraged elephants. In further experiments, the link between the nutritive value of raided plants and the animal’s physiological requirements and status will be assessed through hormones and parasites measurements; while tracking of individual elephants’ movements using DNA analyses in feces will be done. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro assessment of novel carbohydrates prebiotic potential in a co-inoculation model of the pig intestines
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible carbohydrates (CHO) were investigated for their prebiotic potential and their influence on Salmonella thyphimurium in a co-inocu¬lation in vitro fermentation model of the pig intestines. Inulin, cellobiose, pecto- (POS), iso-malto- (IMOS), xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), and gluconic acid (GLU) were fermented by fecal microbes for 72h. Salmonella (7.3 log CFU/ml) were co-inoculated after 6h . Fer¬mentation kinetics was modeled and after 6, 12, 24 h, broth was analysed for short-chain fatty acid using HPLC and bacterial population using q-PCR. Results and discussion: Cellobiose was the fastest fermenting CHO followed by inulin and IMOS (P<0.01). After 6h, cellobiose yielded the highest SCFA production (684 mg/g) and lactate molar ratio (0.484). POS fermented slower. XOS and GLU were little fermented (150 and 175 mg SCFA/g after 24h). Nonetheless, GLU yielded the highest butyrate molar ratio (0.290 at 12h) (P<0.01). Although Salmonella counts did not differ, some CHO dis¬played obvious prebiotic properties, namely inulin and IMOS since they supported the highest growth of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations after 6 and 12h of fermen¬tation (8.18 to 8.56 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). Cellobiose and GLU scored well for Lactobacilli too, but poorly for Bifidobacteria (6.41 to 6.92 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). It is concluded that IMOS seem the most promising prebiotic but owing to their fermentation patterns yield¬ing high levels of lactate or butyrate, also cellobiose and GLU deserve further investigation in in vivo models. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of forage legumes on nutritive value and growth performance in pigs reared in traditional farming systems in tropical Africa
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Kalala, Gaetan; Mafwila, Jacques et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Forage legumes (FL) are used in tropical countries to feed pigs, either by reducing allowance of well-balanced diets and supplementing with FL or by incorporating FL in unbalanced fibre-rich diets. The ... [more ▼]

Forage legumes (FL) are used in tropical countries to feed pigs, either by reducing allowance of well-balanced diets and supplementing with FL or by incorporating FL in unbalanced fibre-rich diets. The impact of both strategies on animal and economical performances was studied in 2 growth experiments. In Exp. 1, 4 groups of 8 growing pigs (25.5 +- 4.2 kg) were fed under one of 4 dietary treatment: a well-balanced diet (CONTROL) ad libitum or 80% of the ad libitum level of CONTROL + ad libitum freshly cut foliage of one of 3 FL species (Vigna unguiculata, Stylosanthes guinanensis, or Psophocarpens scandens). Similarly, in Exp. 2, 4 groups of 6 pigs (22.6 +- 3.7 kg) were fed one of 4 experimental diets: the well-balanced diet (CONTROL), an unbalanced traditional diet rich in fibre and made of bran, brewers grain, and corn (TRAD) or 80% TRAD diet supplemented with 20% of one of 2 FL hays (V. unguiculata or S. guinanensis). Animals were regularly weighed and feed intake was monitored. After 90d, animals were slaughtered and carcass composition and economic traits were recorded to calculate production costs and economical value. In addition, nutritive value of the FL and the diets was assessed by means of an in vitro model of the pig digestive tract combining an enzymatic hydrolysis to a fermentation with a fecal inoculum. Results indicate that pigs fed diets with FL (Exp.1) and TRAD with and without FL (Exp.2) had reduced ADG, final live and carcass weights (P<0.05) compared to CONTROL pigs. Surprisingly , dry matter intake (DMI) was also reduced by 10% with those diets compared to CONTROL (P<0.001) in both experiments. In Exp. 1, FCR and carcass dressing were not affected by the 20% reduction in CONTROL diet and supplementation with fresh FL, while in Exp. 2 those parameters were negatively affected in TRAD with and without FL compared to CONTROL pigs. In vitro data showed that differences in nutritive values explained most differences in growth performances and carcass traits, but not the decrease in intake, since passage rate and voluntary intake are not taken into account in the in vitro model. Economical assessment showed that fresh foliage of FL could increase incomes, as long as their production costs remain marginal, but the incorporation of FL hays could not improve economical performances in pigs fed traditional unbalanced fibre-rich diets. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical characterisation and in vitro assessment of the nutritive value of co-products yield from the corn wet-milling process
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Roiseux, Olivier et al

in Food Chemistry (2015), 166

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability ... [more ▼]

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability value determined using a 2 steps in vitro digestibility and fermentation model of the pig digestive tract. Five co-products differing in their chemical composition were collected and analysed. These co-products differed in their in vitro dry matter Digestibility and in their kinetic of fermentation. High coefficients of digestibility were observed for starchy samples, while low coefficients of digestibility were observed for samples rich in lignocellulosic components. Fermentation patterns of samples analysed were different as well as the profile of volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation. The production of straight-chain fatty acids produced was significantly correlated with the proportion of starch in the sample, while branched-chain fatty acids were correlated to proteins concentration of samples. [less ▲]

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See detailDigestibilité et fermentation intestinale de deux sources de protéines animales, soumises ou non à un traitement thermique, chez le rat en croissance
POELAERT, Christine ULg; Despret, Xavier; Thewis, André ULg et al

in Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme (2014, December), 28(Supplement 1), 176-177

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See detailAccurate monitoring of the rumination behaviour of cattle using IMU signals from a mobile device
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

in Hopkins, A; Collins, RP; Fraser, MD (Eds.) et al EGF at 50: The Future of European Grasslands. Proceedings of the 25th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation. (2014, September)

Improving the monitoring of rumination in cattle could help in assessing of the welfare status and their risk of acidosis. In this work, the monitoring of cattle’s behaviour was performed using the ... [more ▼]

Improving the monitoring of rumination in cattle could help in assessing of the welfare status and their risk of acidosis. In this work, the monitoring of cattle’s behaviour was performed using the inertial measurement unit (IMU) present in smartphones mounted on the neck of cows. The processing of both time and frequency domains of the IMU signals was capable to detect accurately the main behaviours (grazing, rumination and other) and highlight the characteristics of the rumination process. The algorithm for analysis of rumination was more accurate for grazing cattle than for silage-fed cattle in stables. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of Inertial Measurement Unit of a Mobile Device to Discriminate Cattle Grazing and Ruminating Behaviours on Pasture
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg

in Animal Production in Australia (2014, September)

Precision livestock farming is emerging in the wake of the technological developments in remote sensing and motion monitoring. Tools are developed to allow accurate real time monitoring of the individual ... [more ▼]

Precision livestock farming is emerging in the wake of the technological developments in remote sensing and motion monitoring. Tools are developed to allow accurate real time monitoring of the individual cattle behaviour in a quest to improve the management of pastures. Studies have shown the relevancy of accelerometers in the analysis of behaviour using dedicated devices. Accelerometers are located either close to the mouth or jaw of the animal or on its forehead or neck. Records are usually performed at low frequency (<1Hz) and most studies classify behaviours using neuronal networks or multivariate statistical approaches, with little consideration to the animals’ actual movements. Inertial measurement units (IMU) in consumer mobile devices are specifically developed to record accurately user movements. Besides 3D-accelerometer, they can include 3-D rotational speed sensors, 3-D magnetometers and GPS. Optimised power consumption offers significant autonomy. Data directly acquired from the sensors and IMU signals from build-in proprietary algorithms can be recovered using user-friendly low-cost applications. Moreover, mobile devices can store or communicate information by wireless in real time at high frequency. As movements of cattle are in the same range as humans, this study investigates the relevancy of mobile devices IMU signals to discriminate main behaviours of cattle on pasture. [less ▲]

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See detailForage plants as alternative feed resource for sustainable pig production in the tropics: a review
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Animal (2014), 8(8), 1298-1311

Globally, pressure on concentrate feed resources is increasing, especially in the tropics where many countries are net importers of food. Forage plants are a possible alternative but their use as feed ... [more ▼]

Globally, pressure on concentrate feed resources is increasing, especially in the tropics where many countries are net importers of food. Forage plants are a possible alternative but their use as feed ingredients for pigs raises several issues related to their higher fibre and plant secondary metabolites contents as well as their lower nutritive value. In this paper, the nutritive value of several forage species as well as the parameters that influence this nutritive value in relationship to the plant family, the physiological stage, the plant part and the preservation method (fresh, hay and silage) are reviewed. The influence of the breed and the physiological status of the animal on animal voluntary intake of fibre-rich ingredients, digestibility as related to gastrointestinal volume and transit time and growth performances are also discussed. The final section highlights the assets and drawbacks of forage plants in pig diets and stresses the need for proper economic evaluation to conclude on the benefits of the use of forage plants in pig feed. [less ▲]

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See detailFeeding value of hays of tropical forage legumes in pigs: Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Boudry, Christelle; Picron, Pascale ULg et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (2014), 46(8),

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were ... [more ▼]

he effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were studied in growing pigs using a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing varying proportions of forage legume hays (0, 10, 20 and 40 % or 0, 12.5 and 25 % for VFI and nutritive value determination, respectively). There was no difference in VFI between species (P > 0.20), but a linear response to forage inclusion level (P < 0.05) was observed decreasing from 126 for 0 % to approximately 84 g/kg of body weight for the 40 % forage diets, except for V. unguiculata, where the response was quadratic (P = 0.01). All four forage species linearly decreased the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) from 0.76 to 0.61, 0.80 to 0.68, 0.54 to 0.40 and 0.58 to 0.31 except for S. guianensis (0.44) for DM, N, NDF and N retention, respectively. Differences in digestibility (P < 0.05) between species were also observed. Due to their negative influence on the overall digestibility, the contribution of hays should not exceed 12.5 %, except for S. guianensis, in which N retention remained quite high (0.44) at the highest inclusion level (25 %). P. phaseoloides hay should be avoided in pigs as it combines the lowest VFI with the lowest nutrient digestibility [less ▲]

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See detailThe performance of mobile devices' inertial measurement unit for the detection of cattle's behaviors on pasture
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Dumont, Benjamin ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg et al

Conference (2014, July 21)

Over the past decade, the Precision Livestock Farming (PLF) concept has taken a considerable place in the development of accurate methods for a better management of farm animals, as Precision Agriculture ... [more ▼]

Over the past decade, the Precision Livestock Farming (PLF) concept has taken a considerable place in the development of accurate methods for a better management of farm animals, as Precision Agriculture has done for crop production. Mass consumption mobile devices have nowadays the possibility to record accurately user movements with their Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). We used iPhone 4S to detect accurately cattle behaviors such as grazing and ruminating with the aim of performing a precision grazing management on the near future. Results showed accuracies ranging between 84% and 100% when detecting these two major behaviors by analyzing recorded raw signals in the time-domain. Ongoing research tries to link these behaviors to different pasture characteristics and performs a refined signal processing analysis for a better monitoring of some possible behavioral changes. [less ▲]

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See detailIssues related to protein fermentation in the intestines of pigs
Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Scientific conference (2014, March 27)

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See detailIs the behaviour of grazing cattle influenced by the presence of a hedge in the pasture?
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Yando, Emile; Marche, Christian et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

The interest in using shrubs and trees as forage for cattle is raising in temperate regions, along with the environmental measures promoting hedges along pasture. This study aimed at determining the ... [more ▼]

The interest in using shrubs and trees as forage for cattle is raising in temperate regions, along with the environmental measures promoting hedges along pasture. This study aimed at determining the influence of the presence of a woody hedge on grazing cattle behavior as well as the evolution of this behavior during the grazing season. Twelve heifers were set to graze a standard ryegrass and clover meadow during the grazing season of 2013. The animals were divided in 2 groups : one with a free access to a hedge composed by 10 temperate shrub and tree species, the other with no access to a hedge (control). Their behavior (grazing, browsing and other activities) was monitored during 14h d-1 replicated 3d week-1 during 3 periods (May, July and September). Results suggest that both season and presence of a hedge have an influence on the behavior of heifers. Grazing, resting and rumination varied between the two groups in each period (P<0.05). The time spent browsing was influenced by the season (P<0.001); the heifers with an access to the hedge could browse 19.3% of the total time in May against 5.9 and 5.4% in July and September. Both control and experimental heifers grazed more with the progressing season, but the animals without the hedge grazed always more than the heifers that could graze and browse (49.6 vs 43.0%). In conclusion, browsing woody species represents a significant part of the time spent for forage ingestion, and variation in this behavior over the whole grazing season requires to investigate the influence of both pasture and browse availability and composition. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated farming systems in Kinshasa (DRC) Diversity of agricultural practices
Mafwila Kinkela, Patrick ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; WILLEMS, E, Emilie et al

Poster (2014, February 07)

In Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo, integrated farming of livestock and fish farming is little documented while it is an interesting way of ecological intensification systems. After ... [more ▼]

In Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo, integrated farming of livestock and fish farming is little documented while it is an interesting way of ecological intensification systems. After identifying the density of fish ponds in the territory of the city using satellite images, about 200 farms with at least one pond and located in 2 in peri-urban and rural areas were surveyed to characterize the practical integration of the agricultural system. The preliminary results in one of the valleys indicate that the practice of agriculture in synergy with the pig and fish farming is a common practice although flow of components are still insufficiently integrated and some of them are not optimized . The fish - pig farming associations with or without vegetable production are 44 % of the sample. The identification of flow on farms showed that the manure of pigs is mainly used for crops (51%) or sold (28%), while a small part is used to fertilize the ponds. This may be explained by the predominant share of income (67%) devoted to vegetable production while sludge of ponds is rarely used to fertilize area of vegetable production. Residues of vegetable crops are rarely used to feed pigs and fish because of their limited availability. Feeding pigs and fish is based primarily on agro-industrial by-products such as wheat bran (81%) and the spent brewery grains (62%) and forages (62%). The presentation will analyze the results obtained in the three sites visited and outline opportunities for improvement. [less ▲]

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