References of "Bindelle, Jérôme"
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See detailNutritive value of three tropical forgae legumes and their influence on growth performance, carcass traits and organ weights of pigs
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Kalala Bolokango, Gaetan ULg; Dochain, Denis et al

in Tropical Animal Health and Production (in press)

The effects of tropical forage legumes on feed intake, growth performance and carcass traits were investigated in 16 groups of two Large White × Duroc pigs. The diets consisted of a commercial ... [more ▼]

The effects of tropical forage legumes on feed intake, growth performance and carcass traits were investigated in 16 groups of two Large White × Duroc pigs. The diets consisted of a commercial corn–soybean meal diet as the basal diet and three forage-supplemented diets. Four groups of control pigs received daily 4 % of body weight of the basal diet, and 12 groups of experimental pigs were fed the basal diet at 3.2 % of body weight completed with fresh leaves of one of the three forage legumes (Psophocarpus scandens, Stylosanthes guianensis and Vigna unguiculata) ad libitum. The study lasted 90 days. The in vitro digestion and fermentation of the forage legumes were also determined. The in vitro digestible energy content of the legumes was between 0.72 and 0.77 that of the basal diet (14.4 MJ/kg dry matter (DM)). V. unguiculata was the most digestible forage legume expected for crude protein digestibility. Feeding forage legumes lowered the dry matter intake by 4.5 to 9.6 % (P< 0.05), final body weight (P= 0.013), slaughter weight, average daily gain and hot carcass weight (P< 0.05) without affecting the feed conversion ratio (FCR), dressing percentage and back fat thickness. In conclusion, using forage to feed pig could be interesting in pig smallholder productionwith limited access to concentrate, as FCR was not significantly affected. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of new potential prebiotics on Salmonella Thyphimurium in pigs
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham; Everaert, Nadia ULg; Boudry, Christelle et al

Conference (2016, April 15)

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See detailImpact of wheat bran supplementation to sows on their milk quality, their performances and their progeny’s
Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

Conference (2016, April 15)

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See detailEarly life programming of pigs' intestinal microbiota, intestinal functioning and hepatic metabolism by maternal wheat bran supplementation
Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

Poster (2016, February 05)

The gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota plays many roles on the host’s health, acting as a barrier against pathogens and influencing the development and maturation of the mucosa, important for host’s ... [more ▼]

The gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota plays many roles on the host’s health, acting as a barrier against pathogens and influencing the development and maturation of the mucosa, important for host’s immunity. Microbial colonization occurs pre- and postnatally, via maternal transfer i.e. by milk and by the contact with sows faeces. Hence, the early establishment of a beneficial gastrointestinal microbiota in piglets was investigated by supplementing the sows with wheat bran that we consider as a prebiotic (rich in non-starch polysaccharides). Sows were fed either a wheat bran-enriched diet (25% in gestation, 14% in lactation) either a control diet. Piglets were suckling during 4 weeks, receiving a standard creep feed containing no pre- or probiotic from the second week until weaning. The direct effect of wheat bran on the fecal microbial composition of the sow has been analyzed as well as the chemical composition and immunoglobulins content of the colostrum and milk. Sows and piglets growth performances have been recorded at different time points to verify that wheat bran doesn’t impair performances. At weaning, piglets have been euthanized and the impact of the maternal treatment was investigated at different levels: growth performances, ileal and colonic microbiota, intestinal physiology and immunological response and metabolism. A second animal experiment will be performed next year including a metabolic challenge by giving half of the piglets a high-energy diet post-weaning. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro evaluation of protein precipitation capacity of temperate browse species
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Leblois, Julie ULg; Ramírez-Restrepo, Carlos Alberto et al

Poster (2016, February 05)

European agri-environmental policies are promoting the establishment of shrubs and trees on grasslands. The use of browse as fodder requires knowledge on their nutritive value since intensive production ... [more ▼]

European agri-environmental policies are promoting the establishment of shrubs and trees on grasslands. The use of browse as fodder requires knowledge on their nutritive value since intensive production systems are still relying on expensive and environment-costing protein sources. However, information on the influence of temperate condensed tannins (CT)-containing browse forage on rumen protein metabolism is elusive. The study aimed to assess the protein precipitation capacity (PPC) of 10 temperate browse species and establish the correlation between PPC values and plants CT content. PPC of foliage of 3 individuals per woody plants was measured using 2 model proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The N content in protein solutions (4.6g/L; pH=6.8) was determined before and after adding each forage sample. Extractable CT concentration was quantified by spectrophotometry. The PPC varied across plant species (P<0.001). Corylus avellana had the highest ability to precipitate casein (52.4%). In contrast, the BSA precipitation (18.3%) of this plant was similar to Cornus sanguinea (12.7%), Quercus robur (12.1%) and Crataegus monogyna (11.0%). CT content ranged from 1.4 in Fraxinus excelsior to 82.7g/kg of depigmented sample in Corylus avellana (P<0.001) and was correlated to BSA (r=0.70; P<0.001) and casein PC (r=0.51; P<0.01). It was concluded that woody species could play a significant role in modifying protein metabolism, but further in vivo trials are required. [less ▲]

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See detailLINKING CATTLE GRAZING BEHAVIOR TO METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE DYNAMICS
Blaise, Yannick ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2016, February), 81(1), 107-112

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well ... [more ▼]

Various methods are presently used to measure methane (CH4) emissions of ruminants on pasture. Those measurements are essential to evaluate nutritional strategies to mitigate enteric CH4 emissions as well as addressing the selection of low producing individuals. On pasture and in the barn, variations in CH4 emissions are observed depending on the time of the day. However, no studies have been made to link these diurnal fluctuations to behavioural phases, especially on pasture. The aim of this study was to understand the individual dynamics of CH4 production and their links to the grazing behaviour. For this purpose, a new tool was specifically developed. Five red-pied dry cows were equipped with infrared CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors measuring concentrations in the exhaled air at 4 Hz. The animals were equipped with a heart rate belt (HR) and motion sensors to detect their feeding behaviours (grazing vs. rumination) for periods of 8 h/d. Wind speed (WS) was also monitor to verify interference with sampled gas concentrations. Results showed that using the CH4:CO2 ratio reduced the interference with WS that was observed on raw CH4 and CO2 concentration signals. CH4:CO2 ratio average over 5 min periods indicated that CH4 emissions were lower during grazing than rumination (P<0.01). The eructation frequency during grazing (0.48 eructation/min, P<0.01) was also lower than during rumination (0.65 eructation/min). HR was higher during grazing that rumination. Because HR is usually linked to metabolic CO2 production intensity, hence influencing the denominator of the CH4:CO2 ratio, further investigation should focus on the quantification of changes in fermentative and metabolic CO2 emissions along the day to estimate total CH4 production more accurately and the relationship between CH4 emissions patterns and post-feeding times. [less ▲]

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See detailOUTDOOR MEASUREMENT OF CATTLE METHANE EMISSIONS USING THE EDDY-COVARIANCE TECHNIQUE IN COMBINATION WITH GEOLOCALIZATION DEVICES
Dumortier, Pierre ULg; Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Aubinet, Marc ULg et al

Poster (2016, February)

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options ... [more ▼]

Methane emissions account for 8% of the EU-15 GHG emissions and livestock generates approximately half of these emissions [1]. In order to improve emissions reporting and properly test mitigation options, techniques for measuring methane emissions from cattle must be developed and adapted to each management system. Among available micrometeorological methods, the use of eddy-covariance is still in its infancy [2] and its relevance and robustness for cattle flux estimation has still to be proved. On one hand, it is well adapted to seasonal grazing systems, is non-invasive, needs little animal handling and allows detection of daily emission patterns. On the other hand, it has the drawback of requiring cattle geo-localization and long periods of measurements (typically one month). In this study, we combined measured CH4 fluxes with a footprint model [3] and cattle positions (GPS devices) over several one-month campaigns at key periods in the grazing season in order to obtain CH4 emissions per cow at herd scale. Accelerometers were also added to the system for behaviour detection, opening the possibility of linking emissions to feeding behaviour. Measurements were performed and are still ongoing at the Dorinne Terrestrial Observatory in 2014/2015. The first campaign provided a mean emission per cow of 65±6 kg CH4.LSU-1.year-1. Cattle emission pattern was tightly linked with behaviour pattern, emissions being higher during and shortly after grazing (i.e. at dawn and dusk). Uncertainties linked to the method will be discussed and quantified (footprint model validity, geo-localization precision, eddy covariance corrections and filtering specificities linked to CH4 measurements). Compilation of data from multiple campaigns will allow quantification of the effects of forage quality, animal weight and lactating state on emissions per cow. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of shrubs and trees in intensive ruminant systems in temperate areas
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Ramìrez-Restrepo, Carlos Alberto; Beckers, Yves ULg et al

Conference (2016, January)

Using shrubs and trees as forage for ruminants is common in extensive production systems in the tropics, as well as the Mediterranean region and mountain areas. In temperate Europe, the intensification of ... [more ▼]

Using shrubs and trees as forage for ruminants is common in extensive production systems in the tropics, as well as the Mediterranean region and mountain areas. In temperate Europe, the intensification of agriculture led to a decline in the numbers of woody perennials on farmlands. A review of the potential uses of shrubs and trees in temperate intensive systems shows that this concept is rather recent. Few studies have been investigating the potential outputs and limitations of shrubs and trees forage in production systems, while in Belgium and other European countries, agro-environmental policies are promoting the establishment of hedgerows and woody strips that provide shelter to animals against variable climate conditions. Furthermore, it has been found that ruminant species browse the plants, or alternatively, the forage is harvested and fed fresh or preserved as hay, silages or pellets. In both cases, consequences on feed intake control, woody plant survival, dry matter (DM) production and forage quality in terms of crude protein content reduction have been documented. In addition, depending on the plant species and the preservation method, bio-active plant metabolites such as condensed tannins (CT) are also present in the range of less than 1 to more than 100 g/kg foliage DM. Overall, CT may reduce ruminal N degradation, methanogenesis and nematode parasites infestation, while enhancing microbial-protein synthesis, feed use efficiency and systemic animal physiology. Planting shrubs and trees into the agricultural landscape (i.e. silvopastoral system) can further improve biodiversity and environmental services. Nevertheless, agronomic practices, farm management or environmental policy limitations may reduce the use of this fodder resource. Therefore, although silvopastoral systems seem promising in temperate ruminant systems, the current knowledge to their introduction and efficient management need to be cautiously considered. [less ▲]

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See detailAdding mucins to an in vitro batch fermentation model of the large intestine induces changes in microbial population isolated from porcine feces depending on the substrate
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in FEMS Microbiology Ecology (2016), 92(2), 13

Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine showed that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosa layers to ... [more ▼]

Adding mucus to in vitro fermentation models of the large intestine showed that some genera, namely lactobacilli, are dependent on host-microbiota interactions and that they rely on mucosa layers to increase their activity. This study investigates whether this dependence on mucus is substrate-dependent and to which extend other genera are impacted by the presence of mucus. Inulin and cellulose were fermented in vitro by a fecal inoculum from pig in the presence or not of mucin-beads in order to compare fermentation patterns and bacterial communities. Mucins increased final gas production with inulin and shifted short-chain fatty acids molar ratios (P<0.001). QPCR analyses revealed that Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. decreased with mucins, but Bacteroides spp. increased when inulin was fermented. A more in-depth community analysis indicated that the mucins increased Proteobacteria (0.55 vs. 0.25 %, P=0.013), Verrucomicrobia (5.25 vs. 0.03 %, P=0.032), Ruminococcaceae, Bacteroidaceae, and Akkermansia spp.. Proteobacteria (5.67 vs. 0.55 %, P<0.001) and Lachnospiraceae (33 vs. 10.4 %) were promoted in the mucuscompared to the broth, while Ruminococcaceae decreased. The introduction of mucins affected many microbial genera and fermentation patterns, but from PCA results, the impact of mucus was independent from the fermentation substrate. [less ▲]

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See detailIntra-cultivar potential of Desmanthus spp. as a greenhouse gas mitigation strategy for tropical livestock pastoral systems
Vandermeulen, Sophie ULg; Ramírez-Restrepo, Carlos Alberto; Singh, Sultan et al

Poster (2015, November)

Improved agricultural efficiency and reduction in the impacts of tropical livestock farming on habitat degradation require global approaches that enhance ruminant farming functionality in terms of feed ... [more ▼]

Improved agricultural efficiency and reduction in the impacts of tropical livestock farming on habitat degradation require global approaches that enhance ruminant farming functionality in terms of feed use efficiency, emissions and food security. This study evaluated the in vitro mitigation potential of the prostrate to erect, herbaceous Desmanthus spp. pasture legume adapted to semiarid clay soil land types in northern Australia. D. bicornutus, D. leptophyllus and D. virgatus were seasonally harvested from commercial plots by Agrimix Pty. Ltd. Samples of the legumes and the control Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana) using ruminal fluid from grazing Brahman (Bos indicus) steers were incubated in vitro (Ankom RF1 Technology) for 24, 48 and 72 h. Overall, the in vitro organic matter degradability (OMD) and methane production between Desmanthus species differed (P < 0.001). Compared to the control (0.656 ± 0.027 proportion of total OM) at 48 h of incubation, D. leptophyllus showed lower OMD (0.479 ± 0.016), while D. bicornutus (0.688 ± 0.016) and D. virgatus (0.619 ± 0.015) were different from each other, but similar to the control. Methane production (ml/g OM) was 15.7 ± 1.54, 3.7 ± 0.89, 12.0 ± 0.95 and 11.7 ± 0.95, respectively. It is suggested that the impact of these attributes may benefit household farmers in developing economies to expand productivity, improve livelihoods and meet the growing food consumption. Further analyses of the intra-cultivar characteristics of Desmanthus spp. will complement the design of sustainable and efficient interventions across tropical pastoral feeding systems, with a particular emphasis on large-scale grazing operations. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in biting characteristics recorded using the inertial measurement unit of a smartphone reflect differences in sward attributes
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

in Guarino, Marcella; Berckmans, Daniel (Eds.) Precision Livestock Farming '15 (2015, September)

Accurate monitoring of grazing activity at individual cow level would provide useful information to farmers to improve the management of their animals and pastures in intensive dairy systems. Pasture ... [more ▼]

Accurate monitoring of grazing activity at individual cow level would provide useful information to farmers to improve the management of their animals and pastures in intensive dairy systems. Pasture attributes, starting with sward height, influence grazing behaviour and bites characteristics. In an attempt to link sward height to an individual automated detection of biting behaviour, a series of recording sessions of 4×3 days were realized on a ryegrass pasture with two contrasting heights (5 and 15 cm) over the grazing season (from July to October) with 4 dry red-pied cows equipped with the inertial measurement unit (IMU) of a smartphone on a halter, recording acceleration data at 100Hz. The behaviours were video-recorded. The number of grazing bouts performed during grazing trends to increase when the grass is highest. Fourier transforms of acceleration data showed that grazing bouts were characterized by a distinctive acceleration peak which frequency ranged between 1.02Hz and 1.46Hz whatever the sward height. It corresponded to the uprooting of grass frequency in the biting movement when compared with the observation in the video recordings and it could be used to improve automated grazing behaviour detection and to remotely characterize bites. These results show that some bite characteristics are influenced by sward height and automated individual monitoring of grazing behaviour is possible. An extension of this methodology should allow analysing more deeply the grazing behaviour of cattle in order to determine number of bites and possibly to link it to biomass intake. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of inulin and wheat bran in the creep feed of neonatal piglets
Li, Bing ULg; Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 22)

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See detailIn vitro evaluation of fermentation characteristics of two types of insects, as potential novel protein feeds for pigs
POELAERT, Christine ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Despret, Xavier et al

in 13th International Symposium on Digestive Physiology of Pigs (2015, May)

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See detailImproving knowledge on Forest elephant’s ecophysiology (Loxodonta africana cyclotis) for better wildlife conservation
Ngama, Steeve ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

Poster (2015, March 21)

Conservation of large wildlife species is currently a major issue in Africa. Protected areas dedicated for biodiversity conservation unfortunately do not suffice and conservation practices must be ... [more ▼]

Conservation of large wildlife species is currently a major issue in Africa. Protected areas dedicated for biodiversity conservation unfortunately do not suffice and conservation practices must be extended to man-used areas. But in those areas conservation actions are limited because of conflicts between human and wildlife especially due to damages on crops. The worst crop raiders known are elephants because they can destroy the yearly harvest of a field in a single visit. This threatens not only people livelihoods but also elephants themselves when angry farmers retaliate by shooting or trapping them. After decades of investigations crop raiding drivers related to elephants’ ecophysiology remain largely unknown. A pilot study was conducted between July and November 2014 in Monts de Cristal National Park (Gabon, central Africa) to have a first view on environmental drivers to crop raiding. While the presence of some fruiting trees around crop fields lead to more damages, high slopes discouraged elephants. In further experiments, the link between the nutritive value of raided plants and the animal’s physiological requirements and status will be assessed through hormones and parasites measurements; while tracking of individual elephants’ movements using DNA analyses in feces will be done. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vitro assessment of novel carbohydrates prebiotic potential in a co-inoculation model of the pig intestines
Tran, Thi Hanh Tham ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Everaert, Nadia ULg et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Innovative plant biomass fractionation methods produce new feed additives that could modulate the pig intestinal microbial population. Material and methods: Such novel indigestible carbohydrates (CHO) were investigated for their prebiotic potential and their influence on Salmonella thyphimurium in a co-inocu¬lation in vitro fermentation model of the pig intestines. Inulin, cellobiose, pecto- (POS), iso-malto- (IMOS), xylo-oligosaccharides (XOS), and gluconic acid (GLU) were fermented by fecal microbes for 72h. Salmonella (7.3 log CFU/ml) were co-inoculated after 6h . Fer¬mentation kinetics was modeled and after 6, 12, 24 h, broth was analysed for short-chain fatty acid using HPLC and bacterial population using q-PCR. Results and discussion: Cellobiose was the fastest fermenting CHO followed by inulin and IMOS (P<0.01). After 6h, cellobiose yielded the highest SCFA production (684 mg/g) and lactate molar ratio (0.484). POS fermented slower. XOS and GLU were little fermented (150 and 175 mg SCFA/g after 24h). Nonetheless, GLU yielded the highest butyrate molar ratio (0.290 at 12h) (P<0.01). Although Salmonella counts did not differ, some CHO dis¬played obvious prebiotic properties, namely inulin and IMOS since they supported the highest growth of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria populations after 6 and 12h of fermen¬tation (8.18 to 8.56 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). Cellobiose and GLU scored well for Lactobacilli too, but poorly for Bifidobacteria (6.41 to 6.92 log CFU/ml) (P<0.01). It is concluded that IMOS seem the most promising prebiotic but owing to their fermentation patterns yield¬ing high levels of lactate or butyrate, also cellobiose and GLU deserve further investigation in in vivo models. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of forage legumes on nutritive value and growth performance in pigs reared in traditional farming systems in tropical Africa
Kambashi Mutiaka, Bienvenu ULg; Kalala, Gaetan; Mafwila, Jacques et al

in Book of Abstracts (2015)

Forage legumes (FL) are used in tropical countries to feed pigs, either by reducing allowance of well-balanced diets and supplementing with FL or by incorporating FL in unbalanced fibre-rich diets. The ... [more ▼]

Forage legumes (FL) are used in tropical countries to feed pigs, either by reducing allowance of well-balanced diets and supplementing with FL or by incorporating FL in unbalanced fibre-rich diets. The impact of both strategies on animal and economical performances was studied in 2 growth experiments. In Exp. 1, 4 groups of 8 growing pigs (25.5 +- 4.2 kg) were fed under one of 4 dietary treatment: a well-balanced diet (CONTROL) ad libitum or 80% of the ad libitum level of CONTROL + ad libitum freshly cut foliage of one of 3 FL species (Vigna unguiculata, Stylosanthes guinanensis, or Psophocarpens scandens). Similarly, in Exp. 2, 4 groups of 6 pigs (22.6 +- 3.7 kg) were fed one of 4 experimental diets: the well-balanced diet (CONTROL), an unbalanced traditional diet rich in fibre and made of bran, brewers grain, and corn (TRAD) or 80% TRAD diet supplemented with 20% of one of 2 FL hays (V. unguiculata or S. guinanensis). Animals were regularly weighed and feed intake was monitored. After 90d, animals were slaughtered and carcass composition and economic traits were recorded to calculate production costs and economical value. In addition, nutritive value of the FL and the diets was assessed by means of an in vitro model of the pig digestive tract combining an enzymatic hydrolysis to a fermentation with a fecal inoculum. Results indicate that pigs fed diets with FL (Exp.1) and TRAD with and without FL (Exp.2) had reduced ADG, final live and carcass weights (P<0.05) compared to CONTROL pigs. Surprisingly , dry matter intake (DMI) was also reduced by 10% with those diets compared to CONTROL (P<0.001) in both experiments. In Exp. 1, FCR and carcass dressing were not affected by the 20% reduction in CONTROL diet and supplementation with fresh FL, while in Exp. 2 those parameters were negatively affected in TRAD with and without FL compared to CONTROL pigs. In vitro data showed that differences in nutritive values explained most differences in growth performances and carcass traits, but not the decrease in intake, since passage rate and voluntary intake are not taken into account in the in vitro model. Economical assessment showed that fresh foliage of FL could increase incomes, as long as their production costs remain marginal, but the incorporation of FL hays could not improve economical performances in pigs fed traditional unbalanced fibre-rich diets. [less ▲]

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See detailChemical characterisation and in vitro assessment of the nutritive value of co-products yield from the corn wet-milling process
Malumba Kamba, Paul ULg; Boudry, Christelle ULg; Roiseux, Olivier et al

in Food Chemistry (2015), 166

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability ... [more ▼]

The chemical characteristics of co-products recovered during a laboratory-scale wet milling procedure as well as that of whole corn flour were characterised and their digestibility and fermentability value determined using a 2 steps in vitro digestibility and fermentation model of the pig digestive tract. Five co-products differing in their chemical composition were collected and analysed. These co-products differed in their in vitro dry matter Digestibility and in their kinetic of fermentation. High coefficients of digestibility were observed for starchy samples, while low coefficients of digestibility were observed for samples rich in lignocellulosic components. Fermentation patterns of samples analysed were different as well as the profile of volatile fatty acids produced during the fermentation. The production of straight-chain fatty acids produced was significantly correlated with the proportion of starch in the sample, while branched-chain fatty acids were correlated to proteins concentration of samples. [less ▲]

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See detailDigestibilité et fermentation intestinale de deux sources de protéines animales, soumises ou non à un traitement thermique, chez le rat en croissance
POELAERT, Christine ULg; Despret, Xavier; Thewis, André ULg et al

in Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme (2014, December), 28(Supplement 1), 176-177

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See detailAccurate monitoring of the rumination behaviour of cattle using IMU signals from a mobile device
Andriamandroso, Andriamasinoro ULg; Lebeau, Frédéric ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg

in Hopkins, A; Collins, RP; Fraser, MD (Eds.) et al EGF at 50: The Future of European Grasslands. Proceedings of the 25th General Meeting of the European Grassland Federation. (2014, September)

Improving the monitoring of rumination in cattle could help in assessing of the welfare status and their risk of acidosis. In this work, the monitoring of cattle’s behaviour was performed using the ... [more ▼]

Improving the monitoring of rumination in cattle could help in assessing of the welfare status and their risk of acidosis. In this work, the monitoring of cattle’s behaviour was performed using the inertial measurement unit (IMU) present in smartphones mounted on the neck of cows. The processing of both time and frequency domains of the IMU signals was capable to detect accurately the main behaviours (grazing, rumination and other) and highlight the characteristics of the rumination process. The algorithm for analysis of rumination was more accurate for grazing cattle than for silage-fed cattle in stables. [less ▲]

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