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See detailEffects of Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) levels in non-invasive ventilated patients: titrating NAVA levels with electric diaphragmatic activity and tidal volume matching
Chiew, YS; Chase, JG; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in BioMedical Engineering OnLine (2013)

BACKGROUND: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers pressure in proportion to diaphragm electrical activity (Eadi). However, each patient responds differently to NAVA levels. This study aims ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) delivers pressure in proportion to diaphragm electrical activity (Eadi). However, each patient responds differently to NAVA levels. This study aims to examine the matching between tidal volume (Vt) and patients' inspiratory demand (Eadi), and to investigate patient-specific response to various NAVA levels in non-invasively ventilated patients. METHODS: 12 patients were ventilated non-invasively with NAVA using three different NAVA levels. NAVA100 was set according to the manufacturer's recommendation to have similar peak airway pressure as during pressure support. NAVA level was then adjusted ±50% (NAVA50, NAVA150). Airway pressure, flow and Eadi were recorded for 15 minutes at each NAVA level. The matching of Vt and integral of Eadi (ʃEadi) were assessed at the different NAVA levels. A metric, Range90, was defined as the 5-95% range of Vt/ʃEadi ratio to assess matching for each NAVA level. Smaller Range90 values indicated better matching of supply to demand. RESULTS: Patients ventilated at NAVA50 had the lowest Range90 with median 25.6 uVs/ml [Interquartile range (IQR): 15.4-70.4], suggesting that, globally, NAVA50 provided better matching between ʃEadi and Vt than NAVA100 and NAVA150. However, on a per-patient basis, 4 patients had the lowest Range90 values in NAVA100, 1 patient at NAVA150 and 7 patients at NAVA50. Robust coefficient of variation for ʃEadi and Vt were not different between NAVA levels. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-specific matching between ʃEadi and Vt was variable, indicating that to obtain the best possible matching, NAVA level setting should be patient specific. The Range90 concept presented to evaluate Vt/ʃEadi is a physiologic metric that could help in individual titration of NAVA level. [less ▲]

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See detailNAVA enhances tidal volume and diaphragmatic electro-myographic activity matching: a Range90 analysis of supply and demand
Moorhead, K. T.; Piquilloud, L.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing (2013), 27(1)

Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a ventilation assist mode that delivers pressure in proportionality to electrical activity of the diaphragm (Eadi). Compared to pressure support ventilation ... [more ▼]

Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) is a ventilation assist mode that delivers pressure in proportionality to electrical activity of the diaphragm (Eadi). Compared to pressure support ventilation (PS), it improves patient-ventilator synchrony and should allow a better expression of patient's intrinsic respiratory variability. We hypothesize that NAVA provides better matching in ventilator tidal volume (Vt) to patients inspiratory demand. 22 patients with acute respiratory failure, ventilated with PS were included in the study. A comparative study was carried out between PS and NAVA, with NAVA gain ensuring the same peak airway pressure as PS. Robust coefficients of variation (CVR) for Eadi and Vt were compared for each mode. The integral of Eadi (sh{phonetic}Eadi) was used to represent patient's inspiratory demand. To evaluate tidal volume and patient's demand matching, Range90 = 5-95 % range of the Vt/sh{phonetic}Eadi ratio was calculated, to normalize and compare differences in demand within and between patients and modes. In this study, peak Eadi and sh{phonetic}Eadi are correlated with median correlation of coefficients, R > 0.95. Median sh{phonetic}Eadi, Vt, neural inspiratory time (Ti_ <br /> Neural), inspiratory time (Ti) and peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) were similar in PS and NAVA. However, it was found that individual patients have higher or smaller sh{phonetic}Eadi, Vt, Ti_ <br /> Neural, Ti and PIP. CVR analysis showed greater Vt variability for NAVA (p < 0.005). Range90 was lower for NAVA than PS for 21 of 22 patients. NAVA provided better matching of Vt to sh{phonetic}Eadi for 21 of 22 patients, and provided greater variability Vt. These results were achieved regardless of differences in ventilatory demand (Eadi) between patients and modes. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) improves patient-ventilator interaction during non-invasive ventilation delivered by face mask
Piquilloud, L; Tassaux, D; Bialais, E et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2012)

PURPOSE: To determine if, compared to pressure support (PS), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) reduces patient-ventilator asynchrony in intensive care patients undergoing noninvasive ventilation ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To determine if, compared to pressure support (PS), neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) reduces patient-ventilator asynchrony in intensive care patients undergoing noninvasive ventilation with an oronasal face mask. METHODS: In this prospective interventional study we compared patient-ventilator synchrony between PS (with ventilator settings determined by the clinician) and NAVA (with the level set so as to obtain the same maximal airway pressure as in PS). Two 20-min recordings of airway pressure, flow and electrical activity of the diaphragm during PS and NAVA were acquired in a randomized order. Trigger delay (T(d)), the patient's neural inspiratory time (T(in)), ventilator pressurization duration (T(iv)), inspiratory time in excess (T(iex)), number of asynchrony events per minute and asynchrony index (AI) were determined. RESULTS: The study included 13 patients, six with COPD, and two with mixed pulmonary disease. T(d) was reduced with NAVA: median 35 ms (IQR 31-53 ms) versus 181 ms (122-208 ms); p = 0.0002. NAVA reduced both premature and delayed cyclings in the majority of patients, but not the median T(iex) value. The total number of asynchrony events tended to be reduced with NAVA: 1.0 events/min (0.5-3.1 events/min) versus 4.4 events/min (0.9-12.1 events/min); p = 0.08. AI was lower with NAVA: 4.9 % (2.5-10.5 %) versus 15.8 % (5.5-49.6 %); p = 0.03. During NAVA, there were no ineffective efforts, or late or premature cyclings. PaO(2) and PaCO(2) were not different between ventilatory modes. CONCLUSION: Compared to PS, NAVA improved patient ventilator synchrony during noninvasive ventilation by reducing T(d) and AI. Moreover, with NAVA, ineffective efforts, and late and premature cyclings were absent. [less ▲]

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See detailRange90 as indicator for ventilator output versus patients demand: NAVA and pressure support for non-invasively ventilated patients
Chiew, YS; Piquilloud, L.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of the World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering 2012 (2012)

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See detailRespiratory variability in mechanically ventilated patients
Desaive, Thomas ULg; Piquilloud, L.; Moorhead, KT et al

in Critical Care (2011), 15 (Suppl 1)

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See detailNeurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) improves the matching of diaphragmatic electrical activity and tidal volume in comparison to pressure support (PS)
Piquilloud, L; Chiew, YS; Bialais, E et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2011), 37 (Suppl 1)

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See detailPatient-ventilator synchrony and tidal volume variability using NAVA and pressure support mechanical ventilation modes
Moorhead, K. T.; Piquilloud, L.; LAMBERMONT, Bernard ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 18th IFAC world congress, 2011 (2011)

Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a new ventilatory mode in which ventilator settings are adjusted based on the electrical activity detected in the diaphragm (Eadi). This mode offers ... [more ▼]

Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA) is a new ventilatory mode in which ventilator settings are adjusted based on the electrical activity detected in the diaphragm (Eadi). This mode offers significant advantages in mechanical ventilation over standard pressure support (PS) modes, since ventilator input is determined directly from patient ventilatory demand. A comparative study of 22 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in both PS and NAVA modes was conducted, and it was concluded that for a given variability in Eadi, there is greater variability in tidal volume and correlation between the tidal volume and the diaphragmatic electrical activity with NAVA compared to PS. These results are consistent with the improved patient-ventilator synchrony reported in the literature. © 2011 IFAC. [less ▲]

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See detailNAVA enhances ventilatory variability and diaphragmaticactivity/tidal volume coupling
Moorhead, K.; Piquilloud, L.; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2010), 36(2), 326-326

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See detailEffect of various Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) gains on the relationship between diaphragmatic activity (Eadi max) and tidal volume
Chiew, YS; Piquilloud, L.; Desaive, Thomas ULg et al

in Intensive Care Medicine (2010), 37 (Suppl 1)

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