References of "Bhardwaj, A"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailStudy of the Forbidden Oxygen Lines in Comets at Different Heliocentric and Nucleocentric Distances
Decock, Alice ULg; Rousselot, P.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULg et al

in Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society (2013, October 01), 45

Oxygen is an important element in the chemistry of the solar system objects given its abundance and its presence in many molecules including H2O 80% of cometary ices). The analysis of oxygen atoms in ... [more ▼]

Oxygen is an important element in the chemistry of the solar system objects given its abundance and its presence in many molecules including H2O 80% of cometary ices). The analysis of oxygen atoms in comets can provide information not only on the comets themselves but also on the solar system. These atoms have been analyzed using the 3 forbidden oxygen lines [OI] observed in emission in the optical region at 5577.339 Å (the green line), 6300.304 Å and 6363.776 Å (the red lines) (Swings, 1962). Our analysis is based on a sample of 12 comets of various origins. The observing material is made of 53 high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the high-resolution UVES spectrograph at the ESO VLT from 2002 to 2012 (Manfroid et al, 2009). After noticing that the green line is blended with one C2 line, we built synthetic spectra of C2 for each observing circumstances and we subtracted its contribution to the cometary spectra in order to ensure the decontamination of the 5577 Å line. Then, we measured the intensity of the 3 [OI] lines at different heliocentric distances. By comparing the green to red lines ratio (G/R) with the Bhardwaj & Raghuram (2012) effective excitation rates, we found that H2O is the main parent molecule when the comet is observed at 1 au. When the comet is located beyond 2.5 au from the Sun, CO2 also contributes to the production of oxygen. Studying forbidden oxygen lines could be a new way to estimate the abundances of CO2 in comets, a very difficult task from the ground (Decock et al. 2013). In order to estimate the effect of the quenching on our results, we analyzed the evolution of the G/R ratio at different nucleocentric distances. For nearby comets, we divided the extended 2D spectrum into several zones in order to analyze the oxygen lines as close as possible to the nucleus (down to ~10 km for the closest comets). Their analysis will allow us to study the link of the oxygen lines with the nucleocentric distance. We found a clear variation of the G/R ratio close to the comet nucleus that is in agreement with a contribution from CO2 as predicted by Raghuram & Bhardwaj (2013). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe electron excited ultraviolet spectrum of HD: Cross sections and transition probabilities
Ajello, J.; Palle, P. V.; Abgrall, H. et al

in Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series (2005), 159(2), 314-330

We have analyzed the high-resolution ultraviolet (UV) emission spectrum of molecular deuterium hydride (HD) excited by electron impact at 100 eV under optically thin, single-scattering experimental ... [more ▼]

We have analyzed the high-resolution ultraviolet (UV) emission spectrum of molecular deuterium hydride (HD) excited by electron impact at 100 eV under optically thin, single-scattering experimental conditions. The high-resolution spectrum (FWHM = 160 m angstrom) spans the wavelength range from 900 to 1650 angstrom and contains the two Rydberg series of HD: (1)Sigma(u)(+) 1s sigma, np sigma(B, B', B '', n = 2, 3, 4) --> X (1)Sigma(g)(+) and (1)Pi(u)(+)1s sigma, np pi(C, D', D '', D '', n = 2, 3, 4, 5) --> X (1)Sigma(g)(+). A model spectrum of HD, based on newly calculated transition probabilities and line positions including rovibrational coupling for the strongest band systems, B 1 Sigma(u)(+)- X (1)Sigma(+)(g), B' (1)Sigma(u)(+)- X (1)Sigma(g)(+), C (1)Pi(u) - X (1)Sigma(g)(+), and D (1)Pi(u) X (1)Sigma(g)(+), is in excellent agreement with observed intensities. The cross sections for direct excitation at 100 eV of the B (1)Sigma(u)(+), B' (1)Sigma(u)(+), C (1)Pi(u), and D (1)Pi(u) states were derived from a model analysis of the experimental fluorescence spectrum to the ground state. The absolute cross section values for excitation to the B (1)Sigma(u)(+), B' (1)Sigma(u)(+), C (1)Pi(u), and D (1)Pi(u) states were found to be (2.57 +/- 0.26) x 10(-17), (0.22 +/- 0.06) x 10(-17), (2.54 +/- 0,25) x 10(-17), and (0.17 +/- 0.04) x 10(-17) cm(2), respectively. We have also determined the dissociative excitation cross sections at 100 eV for the emission of Ly alpha at 1216 angstrom and Ly beta at 1025 angstrom lines, which are (7.98 +/- 1.12) x 10(-18) and (0.40 +/- 0.10) x 10(-18) cm(2), respectively. The summed excitation function of the closely spaced pair of lines, H Ly alpha and D Ly alpha, resulting from dissociative excitation of HD, has been measured from the threshold to 800 eV and is analytically modeled with a semiempirical relation. The model cross sections are in good agreement with the corrected Ly alpha cross sections of Mohlmann et al. up to 2 keV. Based on measurements of H, D (2s) production cross section values by Mohlmann et al., the H, D (n = 2) cross section is estimated to be 1.6 x 10(-17) cm(2) at 100 eV. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSimultaneous Chandra X ray, Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet, and Ulysses radio observations of Jupiter's aurora
Elsner, Ronald F.; Lugaz, N.; Waite, J. H. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2005), 110(A1),

[1] Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) instrument over 24 - 26 February 2003 show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission ... [more ▼]

[1] Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-S) instrument over 24 - 26 February 2003 show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of precipitating ions, and not a continuum as might be expected from bremsstrahlung. The part of the spectrum due to oxygen peaks around 650 eV, which indicates a high fraction of fully stripped oxygen in the precipitating ion flux. A combination of the OVIII emission lines at 653 eV and 774 eV, as well as the OVII emission lines at 561 eV and 666 eV, are evident in the measure auroral spectrum. There is also line emission at lower energies in the spectral region extending from 250 to 350 eV, which could be from sulfur and/or carbon. The Jovian auroral X-ray spectra are significantly different from the X-ray spectra of comets. The charge state distribution of the oxygen ions implied by the measured auroral X-ray spectra strongly suggests that independent of the source of the energetic ions, magnetospheric or solar wind, the ions have undergone additional acceleration. This spectral evidence for ion acceleration is also consistent with the relatively high intensities of the X rays compared with the available phase space density of the (unaccelerated) source populations of solar wind or magnetospheric ions at Jupiter, which are orders of magnitude too small to explain the observed emissions. The Chandra X-ray observations were executed simultaneously with observations at ultraviolet wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope and at radio wavelengths by the Ulysses spacecraft. These additional data sets suggest that the source of the X rays is magnetospheric in origin and that the precipitating particles are accelerated by strong field-aligned electric fields, which simultaneously create both the several-MeV energetic ion population and the relativistic electrons observed in situ by Ulysses that are correlated with similar to 40 min quasi-periodic radio outbursts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (10 ULg)
See detailAuroral and Non-auroral X-ray Emissions from Jupiter: A Comparative View
Bhardwaj, A.; Elsner, R.; Gladstone, R. et al

Poster (2004)

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from ... [more ▼]

Jovian X-rays can be broadly classified into two categories: (1) "auroral" emission, which is confined to high-latitudes ( ˜>60° ) at both polar regions, and (2) "dayglow" emission, which originates from the sunlit low-latitude ( ˜<50° ) regions of the disk (hereafter called "disk" emissions). Recent X-ray observations of Jupiter by Chandra and XMM-Newton have shown that these two types of X-ray emission from Jupiter have different morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics. In particular: 1) contrary to the auroral X-rays, which are concentrated in a spot in the north and in a band that runs half-way across the planet in the south, the low-latitude X-ray disk is almost uniform; 2) unlike the ˜40±20-min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations; 3) the disk emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum; and 4) the disk X-ray emission show time variability similar to that seen in solar X-rays. These differences and features imply that the processes producing X-rays are different at these two latitude regions on Jupiter. We will present the details of these and other features that suggest the differences between these two classes of X-ray emissions from Jupiter, and discuss the current scenario of the production mechanism of them. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULg)
See detailSimultaneous Chandra X-ray, HST UV, and Ulysses Radio Observations of Jupiter's Aurora
Elsner, R. F.; Bhardwaj, A.; Waite, J. H. et al

Poster (2004)

Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra ACIS-S instrument over 24-26 February, 2003, show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of ... [more ▼]

Observations of Jupiter carried out by the Chandra ACIS-S instrument over 24-26 February, 2003, show that the auroral X-ray spectrum consists of line emission consistent with high-charge states of precipitating ions, and not a continuum as might be expected from bremsstrahlung. The part of the spectrum due to oxygen peaks around 650 eV, which indicates a high fraction of fully-stripped oxygen in the precipitating ion flux. The OVIII emission lines at 653 eV and 774 eV, as well as the OVII emission lines at 561 eV and 666 eV, are clearly identified. There is also line emission at lower energies in the spectral region extending from 250 to 350 eV for which sulfur and carbon lines are possible candidates. The Jovian auroral spectra differ significantly from measured cometary X-ray spectra. The charge state distribution of the oxygen ion emission evident in the measured auroral spectra strongly suggests that, independent of the source of the energetic ions (magnetospheric or solar wind) the ions have undergone additional acceleration. For the magnetospheric case, acceleration to energies exceeding 10 MeV is apparently required. The ion acceleration also helps to explain the high intensities of the X-rays observed. The phase space densities of unaccelerated source populations of either solar wind or magnetospheric ions are orders of magnitude too small to explain the observed emissions. The Chandra X-ray observations were executed simultaneously with observations at ultraviolet wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope and at radio wavelengths by the Ulysses spacecraft. These additional data sets provide interesting hints as to the location of the source region and the acceleration characteristics of the generation mechanism. The combined observations suggest that the source of the X rays is magnetospheric in origin, and that strong field-aligned electric fields are present which simultaneously create both the several-MeV energetic ion population and the relativistic electrons believed to be responsible for the generation of 40 minute quasi-periodic radio outbursts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
See detailPreliminary Results from Recent Simultaneous Chandra/HST Observations of Jupiter Auroral Zones
Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H. et al

Poster (2003)

Jupiter was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in late February, 2003, for 144 ks, using both the ACIS-S and HRC-I imaging x-ray cameras. Five orbits of HST STIS observations of the planet's ... [more ▼]

Jupiter was observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory in late February, 2003, for 144 ks, using both the ACIS-S and HRC-I imaging x-ray cameras. Five orbits of HST STIS observations of the planet's northern auroral zone were obtained during the ACIS-S observations. These data are providing a wealth of information about Jupiter's auroral activity, including the first x-ray spectra from the x-ray hot spots inside the auroral ovals. We will also discuss time variability in the auroral x-ray emission and a possible phase relation between the emission from the northern and southern x-ray aurora. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)
See detailChandra X-ray Observations of the Jovian System
Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. et al

Conference (2002)

High-spatial resolution Chandra x-ray obsrvations have demonstrated that most of Jupiter's northern auroral x-rays come from a hot spot located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the ... [more ▼]

High-spatial resolution Chandra x-ray obsrvations have demonstrated that most of Jupiter's northern auroral x-rays come from a hot spot located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. This hot spot appears fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and coincides with a region exhibiting anomalous ultraviolet and infrared emissions. The hot spot also exhibited approximately 45 minute quasi-periodic oscillations, a period similar to those reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft. These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral x-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the x-rays appear to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths. The Chandra observations also revealed for the first time x-ray emission (about 0.1 GW) from the Io Plasma Torus, as well as very faint x-ray emission (about 1-2 MW) from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is almost certainly due to Kalpha emission of surface atoms (and possibly impact atoms) excited by the impact of highly energetic protons, oxygen, and sulfur atoms and ions from the Torus. The Torus emission is less well understood at present, although bremsstrahlung from the non-thermal tail of the electron distribution may provide a significant fraction. In any case, further observations, already accepted and in the process of being planned, with Chandra, some with the moderate energy resolution of the CCD camera, together with simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope observations and hopefully ground-based IRTF observations should soon provide greater insight into these various processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
See detailSoft X-ray emissions from planets, moons, and comets
Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F. et al

Conference (2002)

A wide variety of solar system bodies are now known to radiate in the soft X-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, Mars): bodies having thick atmospheres, with ... [more ▼]

A wide variety of solar system bodies are now known to radiate in the soft X-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn, Mars): bodies having thick atmospheres, with or without intrinsic magnetic field; planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede): bodies with thin or no atmospheres; and comets and Io plasma torus: bodies having extended tenuous atmospheres. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of soft X-rays from these objects, whereas in the hard X-ray energy range (>10 keV) X-rays mainly result from the electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the X-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
See detailObservations of the Jovian System with the Chandra X-ray Observatory
Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Lewis, W. S. et al

Conference (2002)

Sensitive, very high spatial-resolution x-ray observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed that Jupiter's northern x-ray aurora originates at a spot fixed in a coordinate system rotating ... [more ▼]

Sensitive, very high spatial-resolution x-ray observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed that Jupiter's northern x-ray aurora originates at a spot fixed in a coordinate system rotating with the planet at latitude (60-70 deg north) and longitude (160-180 deg System III). The northern auroral x-ray emission varies with a period about 45 minute and has an average power of about 1 GW. Jupiter's disk also emits x-rays with a power of about 2 GW, perhaps resulting from reprocessing of solar x-rays in its atmosphere. These observations reveal for the first time x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus, with a power of about 0.1 GW. Finally, we report the discovery of very faint (about 1-2 MW) soft x-ray emission from the Galilean satellites Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA pulsating auroral X-ray hot spot on Jupiter
Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

in Nature (2002), 415(6875), 1000-1003

Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions(1-3). Here we report high-spatial ... [more ▼]

Jupiter's X-ray aurora has been thought to be excited by energetic sulphur and oxygen ions precipitating from the inner magnetosphere into the planet's polar regions(1-3). Here we report high-spatial-resolution observations that demonstrate that most of Jupiter's northern auroral X-rays come from a 'hot spot' located significantly poleward of the latitudes connected to the inner magnetosphere. The hot spot seems to be fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and occurs in a region where anomalous infrared(4-7) and ultraviolet(8) emissions have also been observed. We infer from the data that the particles that excite the aurora originate in the outer magnetosphere. The hot spot X-rays pulsate with an approximately 45-min period, a period similar to that reported for high-latitude radio and energetic electron bursts observed by near-Jupiter spacecraft(9,10). These results invalidate the idea that jovian auroral X-ray emissions are mainly excited by steady precipitation of energetic heavy ions from the inner magnetosphere. Instead, the X-rays seem to result from currently unexplained processes in the outer magnetosphere that produce highly localized and highly variable emissions over an extremely wide range of wavelengths. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (11 ULg)
See detailChandra HRC Observations of X-rays from the Jupiter System
Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2001, June 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
See detailX-Ray Emissions from Jupiter
Gladstone, G.; Waite, J.; Grodent, Denis ULg et al

Conference (2001, May 29)

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at ... [more ▼]

X-ray emissions from Jupiter have been observed for over 20~years. Jovian x-ray emissions are associated with the high-latitude aurora and with solar fluorescence and/or an energetic particle source at low-latitudes as identified by past Einstein and ROSAT observations. Enhanced auroral x-rays were also observed to be associated with the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy~9. The high-latitude x-ray emissions are best explained by energetic sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation from the Jovian magnetosphere, a suggestion that has been confirmed by recent Chandra ACIS observations. Exciting new information about Jovian x-ray emissions has been made possible with Chandra's High Resolution Camera. We report here for the first time the detection of a forty minute oscillation associated with the Jovian x-ray aurora. With the help of ultraviolet auroral observations from Hubble Space Telescope, we pinpoint the auroral mapping of the x-rays and provide new information on the x-ray source mechanism. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 ULg)