References of "Beudels-Jamar, Roseline"
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See detailDistribution assessment of endangered Lepilemur in northwestern Madagascar
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline

Scientific conference (2013, October 21)

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See detailLocal perceptions and attitudes towards synanthrope long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) living in Padangtegal Monkey forest, Bali (Indonesia)
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Paquay, Leila; Wandia, I.Nengah et al

Conference (2013, October 03)

The sympatric relationship between humans and other primates in interface zones is a contemporary widespread phenomenon. The expanding landscapes anthropization leads to an intensification of human-other ... [more ▼]

The sympatric relationship between humans and other primates in interface zones is a contemporary widespread phenomenon. The expanding landscapes anthropization leads to an intensification of human-other primate interactions ranging from conflict to co-operation scenarios. Our study investigated the commensal relationships between long-tailed macaques and humans at the tourist Padangtegal Monkey Forest. We present here results related to human-macaque interactions and local people’s perceptions and attitudes towards the latter. We used ethological methods to quantify the nature of the interactions and we conducted a questionnaire survey to identify the macaques’ status in local public opinion. 99 respondents (62 males and 37 females) were selected in a radius of 2km around the Monkey Forest. Perceptions and attitudes were explicitly measured on self-reports and were attributed to a 4 point score. Macaques interacted with humans for 1.1% of their activity budget and these interactions were mostly aggressive (0.6%), food-related (0.4%) or neutral (0.1%). 80% of the aggressive interactions were initiated by humans but the majority aimed at protecting crops and properties from macaques’ incursions. Overall, most of the respondents had positive perceptions and attitudes towards macaques, except neighbouring landowner farmers who suffered from crop damage. Despite nuisances caused by macaques, the majority of the interviewees reported to derive compensatory economic and cultural benefits from their relationships with macaques. The religious and economic contexts might explain the high tolerance level towards macaques that represents a source of hope for a sustainable coexistence, although some management strategies minimizing crop damage still need to be reinforced. [less ▲]

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See detailCould bonobos, Pan paniscus, influence forest re(colonization) in a forest-savana mosaic?
Trolliet, Franck ULg; Serckx, Adeline ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013, September 12)

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See detailImpacts of a recent Streptococcus outbreak in a commensal population of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Bali, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Wandia, I. Nengah; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

Conference (2013, September 11)

The quest for coexistence between humans and primates requires an extensive analysis of the impacts of the growing commensalism phenomenon. In South-east Asia, the long-tailed macaque adapts successfully ... [more ▼]

The quest for coexistence between humans and primates requires an extensive analysis of the impacts of the growing commensalism phenomenon. In South-east Asia, the long-tailed macaque adapts successfully to anthropogenic habitats. The low predation pressure in zones of human-macaque interface and the inclusion of human food in macaques’ diet can lead to local overpopulation. On the other hand, the risk of epidemic disease simultaneously increases with high primate density and proximity with human vectors. Data presented here represent 25 years-population dynamics of a commensal-living population of macaques in Ubud Monkey Forest (Indonesia). Over this period, the population experienced a dramatic growth with an average 11% annual increase rate. In June 2012, we counted 615 individuals divided in 5 groups with a very high density of 61 macaques per hectare. However, two Streptococcus outbreaks have also been reported over the same period, temporarily limiting the steep positive demographic trend of this population. The first epidemic episode appeared in 1994 and the second in July 2012, the last one resulting in 14% mortality in 3 out of 5 groups of the population (563 macaques in October 2012). The comparison between the pre- and post-outbreak periods in 2011-2012 shows changes in macaques’ ranging and behaviour. After the outbreak, the affected groups used smaller and more peripheral home ranges, while the non-affected groups centred their home ranges on the human provisioning places. Besides anthropic factors promoting population growth, epidemic diseases play a significant role in shaping the dynamics and behaviour of this synanthropic population and could have important implications in the future both in terms of management and local conservation status. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecies richness and speciation in the genus Lepilemur in northwestern Madagascar
Wilmet, Leslie ULg; Vermeulen, Cédric ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

Conference (2013, August 05)

Sportive lemurs of the genus Lepilemur are small, nocturnal folivorous lemurs that are exclusively arboreal and generally have small distribution ranges. Owing to these characteristics, they are ... [more ▼]

Sportive lemurs of the genus Lepilemur are small, nocturnal folivorous lemurs that are exclusively arboreal and generally have small distribution ranges. Owing to these characteristics, they are particularly negatively affected by deforestation and habitat fragmentation, which is reflected by the recent uplisting of many of the 26 Lepilemur species into one of the threatened categories of the IUCN Red List. The main aim of this study is to understand the evolutionary mechanisms underlying species richness and speciation processes of the genus Lepilemur in northwestern Madagascar, and to test the predictions of the Inter-River-System biogeographic model of lemur distribution patterns proposed by Olivieri et al. (2007). This study focuses particularly on three Lepilemur taxa: L. sahamalazensis, L. dorsalis and L. mittermeieri, which have their distribution ranges in the northwestern regions of Sofia and Diana. The objectives are to determine their exact distributions, currently unknown; to assess the allopatry or parapatry for L. dorsalis and L. mittermeieri; and to explain the barrier between these two taxa if it exists. A second fundamental aspect of the project consists in the development of noninvasive tools, based on species-specificity of bio-acoustic structures, which will allow species identification in the field. This paper discusses the results from a two-month preliminary field season, conducted from 1st April to 31st May 2013 in order to explore the mainland forests located between the Andranomalaza (Maetsamalaza) and Maevarano rivers. We established the presence/absence of Lepilemur in different forest fragments of this poorly-known area and collected information about land use classes and land use change using remote sensing techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailDemographic trends and Streptococcus outbreaks in a synanthropic population of macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Bali (Indonesia)
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Wandia, I. Nengah; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

Poster (2013, July 22)

The sympatric relationship between humans and primates is a contemporary widespread phenomenon. Several primate species are capable for exploiting human-modified habitats in association with people, but ... [more ▼]

The sympatric relationship between humans and primates is a contemporary widespread phenomenon. Several primate species are capable for exploiting human-modified habitats in association with people, but the most successful species in South-east Asia is probably the long-tailed macaque (M. fascicularis). The low predation pressures in zones of interface and the inclusion of human food in macaques’ diet can lead to local overpopulations. On the other hand, the risk of epidemic disease is simultaneously increased by the high primate density and the proximity with human vectors. Data presented here represent 25 years-population dynamics of a long term commensal-living population of macaques in Ubud Monkey Forest (Indonesia). This population experienced a dramatic growth with an 11% annual increase rate. In June 2012, we counted 615 individuals divided in 5 groups with a very high density of 61 macaques per hectare. However, two Streptococcus outbreaks have also been reported over the same 25 years period, temporarily limiting the steep positive demographic trend of this population. The last epidemic event in July 2012 resulted in a 14% mortality affecting 3 out of 5 groups of the population. Besides the anthropic factors promoting population growth, epidemic diseases play a significant role in shaping the dynamics of this synanthropic population and could have important implications in the future both in terms of local management and local conservation status. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Enhancement of Secondary Succession by Western Lowland Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in a Moist Tropical Forest of Southeast Cameroon
Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Haurez, Barbara ULg; Tagg, Nikki et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013), 84

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See detailBehavioural Ecology of Bonobos (Pan paniscus) in the Forest-Savannah Mosaics of Western Democratic Republic of Congo
Vimond, Marie; Serckx, Adeline ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013)

The long-term survival of the Endangered bonobo (IUCN, 2012) will depend on well thought out conservation programmes that need to be built both upon the species’ ecological requirements and local socio ... [more ▼]

The long-term survival of the Endangered bonobo (IUCN, 2012) will depend on well thought out conservation programmes that need to be built both upon the species’ ecological requirements and local socio-economics realities. Yet there is still a lot to find out, including information on the species geographical distribution. In 2005, the presence of a western population was confirmed in the forest-savannah mosaic in the south-western part of the Lake Tumba Landscape. With the exception of an early study carried out in Lukuru, the species is mainly known from lowland rainforest research sites in the Cuvette Centrale. The western forest-savannah mosaic is an ecotone with a marked seasonal pattern, a high variability of habitats and monthly variations in fruit production. All this leads to spatio-temporal variation of food availability. In order to increase studies and monitoring of this unique population, WWF initiated a habituation process of two groups of bonobos 6 years ago. The groups are now semi-habituated, making the collection of direct daily observations possible. Our objective is to describe the behavioural strategies developed by this population in order to cope with spatio-temporal variations of food availability. This will be approached by identifying daily activity, ranging and grouping patterns, in order to understand how they affect social structure. It should also allow us to define the use of savannahs. Our findings will help determine specific conservations measures for this endangered species. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimizing scale search in species distribution models
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Folia Primatologica : International Journal of Primatology = Internationale Zeitschrift für Primatologie = Journal international de Primatologie (2013), 84

The influence of spatial scale on ecological processes and pattern formation, such as species distribution is a major research topic since decades. It has become even more relevant in the context of ... [more ▼]

The influence of spatial scale on ecological processes and pattern formation, such as species distribution is a major research topic since decades. It has become even more relevant in the context of global change. In many studies the influence of a predictor on a response derived over multiple and discrete spatial scales is evaluated. Due to inherent issue of multiple testing, this approach can be problematic. In this study on bonobos distribution, we suggest a 3-steps procedure that overcomes this problem. It takes into account the decay of a predictor by using a weighting function of distance to the observation of interest. We use variables to account for human pressure, food availability, patchy structure of the forest and nesting sites re-use. In a first step, we run a model with a fixed scale for every predictor based on expert opinion. For significant variables, we derive then in a second step the distance weighted influence over a range of scales. This helps to narrow down the search for the final model parameter estimates. Findings indicate that bonobo distribution is driven on the intermediate scale by forest patches structure. Food availability explains their abundance only at smaller scales. Those results demonstrate the sadly well-known influence of habitat fragmentation on animals’ density and distribution but also highlight the importance to understand influences of scale, the animal perceptions of their environment, by using appropriate statistical procedures. Our method can be particularly useful to formulate specific management hypotheses for conservation. Furthermore, its principles can be of use to other types of studies, such as behavior. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in seed dispersal in tropical forests and implications of its decline
Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Tagg, Nikki; Haurez, Barbara ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2013), 17(3), 517-526

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See detailPlant-animal mutualistic interaction: the case of the Uapaca trees and the western lowland gorilla (G. g. gorilla)
Petre, Charles-Albert ULg; Tagg, Nikki; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

in Primate Tidings (2012), 27

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See detailRanging behaviour and sleeping sites of Macaca fascicularis in Bali Barat National Park, Indonesia
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Maslarov, Cindy; Dosogne, Thibaut et al

Conference (2012, August 15)

Ranging behaviour and sleeping site selection are important primate behavioural traits likely to vary under environmental changes. We tested the role of ecological (predation avoidance) and anthropic ... [more ▼]

Ranging behaviour and sleeping site selection are important primate behavioural traits likely to vary under environmental changes. We tested the role of ecological (predation avoidance) and anthropic (human proximity) factors in Macaca fascicularis range use, an edge species known to prefer living along forests borders and in the vicinity of human settlements. Data result from 56 day follows of one group of Macaca fascicularis exploiting a human-modified landscape within Bali Barat National Park (Indonesia). Observations allowed identifying and describing 17 sleeping sites and the characteristics of 37 sleeping trees. Despite a large forest area available, the group’s home range centred around human settlements. The home range size, average daily range and daily travel decreased over the study period, while the human presence inside the park increased over the corresponding months. The proximity with humans also influenced the pattern of sleeping sites use; macaques slept more than expected close to human settlements and this tendency increased over the study period. In contradiction with the predation avoidance assumption, macaques did not choose sleeping trees significantly taller and larger than other trees available. We conclude that the observed sleeping site strategy (sleeping near humans) could be advantageous in terms of predator avoidance and proximity with human food, but additional influences should not be neglected. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing hurdle models to create maps of prey densities in southeastern of Norway
Bouyer, Yaëlle ULg; Rigot, Thibaud; Panzacchi, Manuela et al

Conference (2012, August 15)

Knowing prey distribution and density in areas where carnivores are present is an important condition to have a better understanding of carnivore movements (Karanth et al. 2004 ; Herfindal et al. 2005 ... [more ▼]

Knowing prey distribution and density in areas where carnivores are present is an important condition to have a better understanding of carnivore movements (Karanth et al. 2004 ; Herfindal et al. 2005). Southeastern of Norway has recently been recolonized by the European Lynx (Lynx lynx) and the wolf (Canis lupus) and in order to be able to predict these carnivore movements, it is important to produce detailed models of their prey abundance and habitat use. Roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus), moose (Alces alces) and mountain hare (Lepus timidus) are commonly hunted by lynx and wolf in Norway (Odden et al. 2006, Wikenros 2001, Müller 2006) but even if these species are well present in the southeastern, no distribution maps are available yet. Using hurdle models, we create the prey maps and test the extent of predictive modeling. Finally, we discuss the limits existing when trying to develop and use predictive maps at large scale. [less ▲]

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See detailPopulation dynamics and ranging behaviour of a highly provisioned population of Macaca fascicularis in Bali: implications for management
Brotcorne, Fany ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg

Conference (2012, May 22)

In response to the global landscape anthropization caused by the extensive urbanization and the recruitment of forestlands for cropping, the primate-human commensalism is growing as well as the related ... [more ▼]

In response to the global landscape anthropization caused by the extensive urbanization and the recruitment of forestlands for cropping, the primate-human commensalism is growing as well as the related interspecific conflict. In zones of interface, humans and primates are sympatric and compete for food and spatial resources. Today, we still poorly know the proportion of synanthrope primates and the impact of anthropic pressures. We present here data on 25 years-population dynamics and ranging behaviour of a long-term commensal-living population of long-tail macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Ubud Monkey Forest, Bali (Indonesia). This population has experienced a dramatic growth over 25 years with an annual increase rate of 11%. In 2011, we counted 614 macaques split in 5 social groups and using an overall home range of 10ha with a 2.41ha core area centred on human provisioning places. We derived a very high population density of 61 macaques per hectare and concluded that this site is overpopulated. Moreover, the conflict between humans and macaques is increasing and requires specific management. As the natural food supply is low in Ubud Monkey Forest, we assume that the high carrying capacity of the site mainly depends on the artificial food supply. The abundance and the quality of artificial food may be the major factor determining such a high population density. The low predation pressure and the habitat compression by destruction of adjacent forests could also influence the positive demographic trend. As a tentative program of population control, we suggest both to lower the caloric content of the food provisioned to macaques and to conduct a sterilization programme. This strategy aims at reducing the conflict with humans and at promoting a sustainable coexistence by reducing birth rates and limiting the macaques’ population growth. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes edge effect influence Bonobos, Pan paniscus, forest use dynamics: a case study in a forest-savannah mosaic of West DR Congo
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg

Conference (2012)

Our study helps understand how fragmented forests affect bonobos forest use. Previous studies already reveal that habitat types influence bonobos’ densities, but forests’ spatial structure could also have ... [more ▼]

Our study helps understand how fragmented forests affect bonobos forest use. Previous studies already reveal that habitat types influence bonobos’ densities, but forests’ spatial structure could also have an impact. In the current context of deforestation and increasing illegal concessions, approaching such questions should help orient future conservation programs. We focus on the influence of edge effect on bonobos forest use, presuming that they avoid areas with non mature forests and increased human pressure. We travelled along transects (113km total) to define habitat types and to record bonobos indices (tracks, food remains and nesting sites) in 200km² of forests in Southwestern Lake Tumba Region. Our results show that bonobos clearly prefer specific habitats for nesting, and, within these nest-forest types, an understory of Marantaceae Haumania sp. is preferentially chosen. To evaluate edge effect on nesting behavior, we counted nesting sites in 100m distance classes from the forest edge. Our results indicate a uniform distribution of nesting sites, but with a negative edge effect in the first 100m. When we analyzed tracks and food remains distribution, we didn’t find any habitat type preferences or any edge effect. These results indicate that, although bonobos are known to favor dense forests, they can also adapt to fragmented forests environment. Habitat types appear to be more relevant to understand their distribution and range. [less ▲]

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See detailBonobos, Pan paniscus, in the forest-savannah mosaics of West DR Congo: does spatial structure influence the forest use dynamics?
Serckx, Adeline ULg; Huynen, Marie-Claude ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline

Conference (2012)

Bonobos, Pan paniscus, are endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) but the species’ range is still not precisely known. For example, the populations from West DRC have only been identified in ... [more ▼]

Bonobos, Pan paniscus, are endemic to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) but the species’ range is still not precisely known. For example, the populations from West DRC have only been identified in 2005, following inventories conducted by WWF. This region is characterized by a forest-savannah mosaic, a particular ecotone with naturally fragmented forests, in which bonobos have hardly ever been studied in comparison with those evolving in central DRC rainforests. The area also increasingly includes numerous anthropogenic activities including logging and cattle ranching. Effective long-term conservation programs are then essential for the survival of bonobos’ populations. We decided to focus our study on bonobos’ forest use dynamics, testing spatial structure influence on bonobos’ density and forest use. This hypothesis is based on a landscape ecology theory, the pattern-process paradigm, establishing a triangular link between the structure, the composition and the ecological processes of a landscape. We used the interior-to-edge ratio to classify our study area (200km² of forests) in 5 categories of forest patches: (i) corridors (0.1 to 5.5km², ratio of 0), (ii) small patches (3.4 to 4.3km², ratios between 0.23 and 0.33), (iii) middle patch with edge area predominant (13.8km², ratio of 0.7), (iv) middle patch with interior area predominant (22.3km², ratio of 1.17), (v) big patch (122.2km², ratio of 1.43). We walked transects (total effort: 126km) to identify habitats (landscape composition) and bonobos’ use indices (nests and food remains – landscape ecological process). Results unexpectedly showed that bonobos use all forest patches, even corridors, mostly used for feeding. Small patches even include higher nest density than the big patch. Moreover, habitats with predominant Marantaceae understory are correlated with higher nest density. The study is still in process and sampling areas will be increased in further field work. The first results however already indicate that we could elaborate a model predicting bonobos’ presence according to habitats and spatial structure and designate forest patches to protect as a priority. This information should allow formulating specific management recommendations for regional conservation programs and logging concessions [less ▲]

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See detailModeling the potential for Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) return in lowland Western Europe
Bouyer, Yaëlle ULg; Poncin, Pascal ULg; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline et al

Poster (2011, December 06)

In the last forty years, tolerance of anthropic environment has allowed large carnivores to recolonize and expand their distribution in Western Europe. To assess the full potential and consequences of ... [more ▼]

In the last forty years, tolerance of anthropic environment has allowed large carnivores to recolonize and expand their distribution in Western Europe. To assess the full potential and consequences of this return, habitat use and landscape modeling are particularly useful tools that allow conservationists to come up with reliable prediction, and policy makers to anticipate management planning. The considerable power of dispersal and important space requirements of these species necessitate large-scale modeling, but it is essential to work in parallel at very fine scale, as carnivores’ impact on human societies is mostly felt at local level. Management of large carnivores must therefore be multi-scalar, with different decisions taken at multiple levels. With the return of the Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) to lowland Western Europe, in regions of relatively high human densities, conservation- planning decisions must be knowledge based. Different approaches will be followed to analyze data at finer and larger scales. These include differential distribution and tolerance of lynx to fragmentation and anthropization, influence of landscape on lynx predation and the development of a conceptual model aiming at responding efficiently to conflicts with human populations. Results will permit the development of a lowland Western Europe habitat model, and to propose conservation measures adapted to the return of this emblematic carnivore. Results will permit the development of a lowland Western Europe habitat model, and to propose conservation measures adapted to the return of this emblematic carnivore. [less ▲]

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