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See detailMatrix metalloproteinase-9, but not tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, increases in the sputum from allergic asthmatic patients after allergen challenge
Cataldo, Didier ULg; Bettiol, J.; Noël, Agnès ULg et al

in CHEST (2002), 122(5), 1553-1559

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether allergen inhalation modulates the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metallloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in the ... [more ▼]

Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether allergen inhalation modulates the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metallloproteinase (TIMP)-1 in the induced sputum recovered from patients during a late-phase reaction. Method: Eight allergic asthma patients and five healthy control subjects inhaled a dose of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extract corresponding to the provocative concentration of the allergen causing a 20% fall in FEV1 and saline solution. Lung function was carefully monitored for 6 h, and an induced sputum test was performed at 6 h after sham challenge or allergen challenge. The total and differential cell counts were analyzed, and the levels of MMP-9 (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and zymography), TIMP-1 (by ELISA), and albumin (by rocket immunoelectrophoresis) were measured. Results: The sputum eosinophil counts (p < 0.01) and MMP-9 levels (p < 0.05) increased significantly in atopic asthma patients after undergoing the allergen challenge but did not in the control subjects. By contrast, TIMP-1 and albumin levels were not significantly increased in any group. MMP-9 levels, measured after the allergen challenge in asthmatic patients, were significantly correlated with FEV1 variations after allergen inhalation (r = 0.51; p < 0.05) and with the sputum neutrophil percentage (r = 0.71; p < 0.01). Conclusion: The levels of MMP-9, but not TIMP-1, increase after inhaled allergen challenge in the sputum of allergic asthmatic patients. This protease increase may lead to a transient imbalance between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 favoring proteolytic extracellular matrix degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailClinique et cytologie sputaire de l'asthme intrinseque
Bettiol, J.; Radermecker, Maurice ULg; Louis, Renaud ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2002), 57(4), 223-7

The diagnosis of intrinsic asthma is evoked in patients with clinical criteria of asthma but, who contrarily to atopic asthmatics, lack history of allergy, specific IgE and skin positive reaction towards ... [more ▼]

The diagnosis of intrinsic asthma is evoked in patients with clinical criteria of asthma but, who contrarily to atopic asthmatics, lack history of allergy, specific IgE and skin positive reaction towards common aeroallergens of the environment. While the bronchial cytology of these two types of asthma is comparable, the immunological mechanisms of intrinsic asthma remain poorly understood because the factors responsible for the bronchial inflammation are unknown. Intrinsic asthma normally begins in adulthood and carries often a more severe prognosis. This disease is more frequent in women and is often associated to nasal polyposis and/or aspirin hypersensitivity. In this work, we have retrospectively studied the demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as the lung function and the sputum cell counts of intrinsic asthmatic outpatients seen during the period of 1996 to 1998 in the Pneumology Department of the CHU Sart Tilman. [less ▲]

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See detailCytokine Production from Peripheral Whole Blood in Atopic and Nonatopic Asthmatics: Relationship with Blood and Sputum Eosinophilia and Serum Ige Levels
Bettiol, J.; Bartsch, Pierre ULg; Louis, Renaud ULg et al

in Allergy (2000), 55(12), 1134-41

BACKGROUND: The cytokine network is thought to be essential in orchestrating airway inflammation in asthma. Although evidence has accumulated to suggest that atopic asthma is a Th2 disease, much less is ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The cytokine network is thought to be essential in orchestrating airway inflammation in asthma. Although evidence has accumulated to suggest that atopic asthma is a Th2 disease, much less is known about nonatopic asthma. METHODS: We have compared the production of IL-4, IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha from peripheral blood leukocytes between atopic (n=21) and nonatopic (n=22) asthmatics and healthy nonatopic subjects (n=20). Peripheral blood was incubated for 24 h either without stimulus or with LPS or PHA. Cytokines were measured by the immunotrapping technique (Dynamic Immunoassay). RESULTS: When compared to healthy nonatopic subjects, both atopic and nonatopic asthmatics showed increased blood and sputum eosinophilia associated with raised total serum IgE levels. Similarly, both asthma groups displayed spontaneous, endotoxin-induced overproduction of IL-6. Enhanced spontaneous, endotoxin-induced release of IL-4 combined with reduced spontaneous IFN-gamma production was seen only in atopic asthma. In this group of patients, the production of IL-4 was related to the extent of blood and sputum eosinophilia. In nonatopic asthmatics, serum levels of IgE were inversely related to the production of IFN-gamma. CONCLUSIONS: Both atopic and intrinsic asthma display raised blood and airway eosinophilia, raised total serum IgE, and overproduction of IL-6 from peripheral blood. Atopic asthma is also characterized by impaired spontaneous release of IFN-gamma and increased production of IL-4 that correlates with the magnitude of eosinophilic inflammation. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of a 4-Week Treatment with Theophylline on Sputum Eosinophilia and Sputum Eosinophil Chemotactic Activity in Steroid-Naive Asthmatics
Louis, Renaud ULg; Bettiol, J.; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in Clinical & Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology (2000), 30(8), 1151-60

BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism of action of theophylline in asthma is not fully understood but recent data have drawn attention to its potential anti-inflammatory effect. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The precise mechanism of action of theophylline in asthma is not fully understood but recent data have drawn attention to its potential anti-inflammatory effect. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of theophylline on sputum eosinophilia and sputum eosinophil chemotactic activity in steroid-naive asthmatics. METHOD: We performed a 4-week randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study in 21 mild to moderate steroid-naive asthmatics whose sputum eosinophilia was found twice > 5% during the run in period. Eleven subjects received 600 mg/24 h theophylline for the first 2 weeks and 900 mg/24 h for the last 2 weeks while 10 subjects took a placebo for 4 weeks. Sputum was induced after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment and 1 week after stopping the treatment. The sputum samples were compared for their cell counts, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels and eosinophil chemotactic activity using micro-Boyden chambers. RESULTS: Serum theophylline concentrations reached 7 and 11 microg/mL at V3 and V4, respectively. Intragroup comparisons showed that theophylline, but not placebo, caused a significant reduction in sputum eosinophil counts at V3 (62 +/- 10% from baseline, P < 0.01) and a strong trend at V4 (67 +/- 16% from baseline, P = 0.07) when compared to baseline. The intergroup difference obtained after comparing the area under the curve over the 4 week treatment period only approached the statistical significance (P = 0.08). At baseline the fluid phase of the sputum contained a significant eosinophil chemotactic activity which was inhibited after a 4-week treatment by theophylline (P < 0. 01) but not by placebo. The mean sputum theophylline levels after 4 weeks of treament (1.7 microg/mL) was lower than that required to cause significant inhibition of eosinophil chemotaxis in vitro. CONCLUSION: Theophylline decreases the natural sputum eosinophil chemotactic activity present in asthmatics. However, when using a small sample size, the 35% reduction in sputum eosinophilia achieved by theophylline failed to reach statistical significance when compared to that seen after placebo. [less ▲]

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See detailTheophylline Decreases Sputum Eosinophilia of Asthmatics
Louis, Renaud ULg; Bettiol, J.; Cataldo, Didier ULg et al

in International Archives of Allergy & Immunology (1999), 118(2-4, Feb-Apr), 343-4

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See detailLes cysteinyl-leucotrienes: des mediateurs importants dans l'asthme
Louis, Renaud ULg; Neven, I.; Quaedvlieg, Valérie ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(9), 598-602

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