References of "Berndt, Sarah"
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See detailEvidence for cross-talk between the LH receptor and LH during implantation in mice
Gridelet, Virginie ULg; Tsampalas, Marie; Berndt, Sarah et al

in Reproduction, Fertility and Development (2013), 25

The present study investigated the first interaction that occurs between the blastocyst and endometrium during implantation. Given the ethical objections to studying implantation in humans, a mouse model ... [more ▼]

The present study investigated the first interaction that occurs between the blastocyst and endometrium during implantation. Given the ethical objections to studying implantation in humans, a mouse model was used to study the dialogue between luteinising hormone (LH) and luteinising hormone receptor (LHCGR). Several studies performed on LHCGR-knockout mice have generated controversy regarding the importance of the dialogue between LH and LHCGR during implantation. There has been no demonstration of a bioactive LH-like signal produced by the murine blastocyst. The first aim of the present study was to examine and quantify, using radioimmunoassay, the generation of a bioactive LH signal by the murine blastocyst. We went on to examine and quantify endometrial Lhcgr expression to validate the mouse model. Expression of LHCGR in mouse uteri was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. To quantify the expression of Lh in the mouse blastocyst and Lhcgr in the endometrium, reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative (q) RT-PCR were performed. The results demonstrate that Lhcgr expression in BALB/c mouse endometrial epithelium is increased at the time of implantation and indicate that LHCGR may contribute to the implantation process. In support of this hypothesis, we identified a bioactive LH signal at the time of murine blastocyst implantation. [less ▲]

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See detailHyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin stimulates angiogenesis through TGF-beta receptor activation.
Berndt, Sarah; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Munaut, Carine ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2013), 27(4), 1309-21

Embryo implantation requires extensive angiogenesis at the maternal-fetal interface. Hyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG-H), a trophoblast invasive signal produced by extravillous ... [more ▼]

Embryo implantation requires extensive angiogenesis at the maternal-fetal interface. Hyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG-H), a trophoblast invasive signal produced by extravillous cytotrophoblasts and by choriocarcinoma, was evaluated for its angiogenic role. hCG-H was purified by HPLC from choriocarcinoma supernatant, and the glycosylation pattern was determined by 2D gel analysis. Angiogenesis models used were aortic ring assay with wild-type and LHCGR-knockout mice, endothelial and mural cell proliferation, and migration assays. The TGF-beta signaling pathway was studied by coimmunoprecipitation, competitive binding, TGF-beta reporter gene assays, and Smad immunoblotting. hCG-H displayed a potent angiogenic effect [3.2-fold increase of number of vessel intersections in wild-type aortic rings (11.406 to 36.964)]. hCG-H-induced angiostimulation was independent of the classic hCG signaling pathway since it persisted in LHCGR-knockout mice [4.73-fold increase of number of vessel intersections (10.826 to 51.288)]. Using TGF-beta signaling inhibitors, Tbeta-RII was identified as the hCG-H receptor responsible for its angiogenic switch. hCG-H exposure enhanced phosphorylation of Smad 2 in endothelial and mural cells and genomic activation of Smad-responsive elements. Interaction between hCG-H and Tbeta-RII was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and binding competition with (125)I-TGF-beta. This new paracrine interaction between trophoblast and endothelial cells through the hCG-H and the TGF-beta receptor complex plays a key role in angiogenesis associated with placental development and tumorigenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailAbnormal vascular architecture at the placental-maternal interface in placenta increta
CHANTRAINE, Frédéric ULg; Blacher, Silvia ULg; Berndt, Sarah et al

in American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2012), 207(3), 1881-9

Objective The objective of the study was to characterize the vascular architecture at the placental-maternal interface in pregnancies complicated by placenta increta and normal pregnancies. Study Design ... [more ▼]

Objective The objective of the study was to characterize the vascular architecture at the placental-maternal interface in pregnancies complicated by placenta increta and normal pregnancies. Study Design Vessel numbers and cross-section area density and spatial and area distributions in 13 placenta-increta placental beds were compared with 9 normal placental beds using computer-assisted image analysis of whole-slide CD31 immunolabeled sections. Results The total areas occupied by vessels in normal and placenta-increta placental beds were comparable, but vessels were significantly sparser and larger in the latter. Moreover, placenta-increta–vessel distributions (area and distance from the placental–myometrial junction) were more heterogeneous. Conclusion Size and spatial organization of the placenta-increta vascular architecture at the placental-maternal interface differed from normal and might partially explain the severe hemorrhage observed during placenta-increta deliveries. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Antiangiogenic 16K Prolactin Impairs Functional Tumor Neovascularization by Inhibiting Vessel Maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(11), 27318-27318

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal ... [more ▼]

Background: Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from existing vasculature, plays an essential role in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. 16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling. Conclusions/Significance: Taken together, our data show that 16K hPRL impairs functional tumor neovascularization by inhibiting vessel maturation and for the first time that an endogenous antiangiogenic agent disturbs Notch signaling. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic 16K prolactin disturbs functional tumor neovascularization by affecting vessel maturation
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Castermans, Karolien; Berndt, Sarah et al

Poster (2011, May)

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K ... [more ▼]

16K hPRL, the antiangiogenic 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin was shown to prevent tumor growth and metastasis by modifying tumor vessel morphology. Here we investigated the effect of 16K hPRL on tumor vessel maturation and on the related signaling pathways. We show that 16K hPRL treatment leads, in a murine B16-F10 tumor model, to a dysfunctional tumor vasculature with reduced pericyte coverage, and disruption of the PDGF-B/PDGFR-B, Ang/Tie2, and Delta/Notch pathways. In an aortic ring assay, 16K hPRL impairs endothelial cell and pericyte outgrowth from the vascular ring. In addition, 16K hPRL prevents pericyte migration to endothelial cells. This event was independent of a direct inhibitory effect of 16K hPRL on pericyte viability, proliferation, or migration. In endothelial cell-pericyte cocultures, we found 16K hPRL to disturb Notch signaling, this being the first time such an effect is observed with an endogenous antiangiogenic agent. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of 16K hPRL action and highlight its potential for use in anticancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailTGFbeta-receptor-dependent angiostimulation through the hyperglycosylated isoform of human chorionic gonadotropin.
Berndt, Sarah; Detilleux, Julien; Blacher, Silvia et al

in Placenta (2011), 32(9), 44

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See detailSoluble forms of VEGF receptor-1 and -2 promote vascular maturation via mural cell recruitment.
LORQUET, Sophie ULg; Berndt, Sarah; Blacher, Silvia ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2010), 24(10), 3782-95

Two soluble forms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, are physiologically released and overproduced in some pathologies. They are known to act as anti-VEGF ... [more ▼]

Two soluble forms of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, sVEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-2, are physiologically released and overproduced in some pathologies. They are known to act as anti-VEGF agents. Here, we report that these soluble receptors contribute to vessel maturation by mediating a dialogue between endothelial cells (EC) and mural cells that leads to blood vessel stabilization. Through a multidisciplinary approach, we provide evidences that these soluble VEGF receptors promote mural cell migration through a paracrine mechanism involving interplay in EC between VEGF/VEGFR-2 and sphingosine-1- phosphate type-1 (S1P)/S1P1 pathways that leads to endothelial nitric oxyde synthase (eNOS) activation. This new paradigm is supported by the finding that sVEGFR-1 and -2: 1) induce an eNOS-dependent outgrowth of a mural cell network in an ex vivo model of angiogenesis, 2) increase the mural cell coverage of neovessels in vitro and in vivo, 3) promote mural cell migration towards EC, 4) stimulate endothelial S1P1 overproduction and eNOS activation that promote the migration and the recruitment of neighboring mural cells. These findings provide new insights into mechanisms regulating physiological and pathological angiogenesis and vessel stabilization. [less ▲]

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See detailChorionic Gonadotropin Stimulation of Angiogenesis and Pericyte Recruitment
Berndt, Sarah; Blacher, Silvia ULg; PERRIER d'HAUTERIVE, Sophie ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2009), 94(11), 4567-74

During the periimplantation period, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays a key role by increasing the uterine blood flow through uterine vessel vasodilatation but also through angiogenesis. Indeed, we ... [more ▼]

During the periimplantation period, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays a key role by increasing the uterine blood flow through uterine vessel vasodilatation but also through angiogenesis. Indeed, we previously demonstrated that hCG contributes to endothelial cell recruitment and vessel formation. OBJECTIVE: In this study, hCG was proposed as an arteriogenic factor that could promote perivascular cell recruitment and vessel stabilization. DESIGN: The aortic ring assay, a three-dimensional ex vivo angiogenesis system mimicking all the steps of the angiogenesis process was used to study the impact of hCG on pericyte recruitment and vessel maturation. SETTING: The study was conducted at a university hospital laboratory. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Perivascular cell proliferation, migration, and apposition were quantified by computerized image analysis. RESULTS: Physiological concentrations of hCG (10-400 IU/ml) significantly enhanced pericyte sprouting and migration and gave rise to the maturation and coverage of endothelial capillaries. In a three-dimensional coculture model of endothelial and perivascular cells, hCG enhanced vessel tube formation and endothelial/mural cell adhesion. In addition, hCG stimulated the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The specificity of these effects was determined by using an anti-hCG blocking antibody. Signaling pathways implicated on this hCG effect is protein kinase A and phospholipase C/protein kinase C dependent for the proliferative effect but only phospholipase C/protein kinase C for the migrative process. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight a novel paracrine role of this early embryonic signal in vessel maturation by stimulating perivascular cell recruitment, migration, and proliferation. [less ▲]

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