References of "Bernard, Claire"
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See detailLesion size effect on variability in PET quantification in multicenter trials
Guiot, Thomas; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Seret, Alain ULg et al

Poster (2013, May 25)

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See detailBrain dead yet mind alive: A positron emission tomography case study of brain metabolism in Cotard’s syndrome
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49(7), 1997-1999

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See detailOrthanc - A lightweight, RESTful DICOM server for healthcare and medical research
JODOGNE, Sébastien ULg; Bernard, Claire ULg; DEVILLERS, Magali ULg et al

in Proceedings, IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: from Nano to Macro (2013, April)

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See detailAutomated platform for the quality control of PET-CT scanners following AFCN/FANC recommendations
Bernard, Claire ULg; Paulus, Cyril; JODOGNE, Sébastien ULg et al

in Proceedings of the Belgian Hospital Physicists Association Symposium (2013, February)

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See detail(111)Indium-oxine labelling for evaluating the homing process of autologous osteoblasts implanted percutaneously in atrophic nonunion fractures.
Hauzeur, Jean-Philippe; Bernard, Claire ULg; Egrise, Dominique et al

in International Orthopaedics (2013), 37(1), 131-6

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to control the in vivo localisation of implanted cells in cell-based therapies. Labelling cells with (111)indium-oxine is one of the most interesting methods proposed. We ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to control the in vivo localisation of implanted cells in cell-based therapies. Labelling cells with (111)indium-oxine is one of the most interesting methods proposed. We evaluated this method in the setting of autologous osteoblast implantation in nonunion fractures. METHODS: An in vitro study of osteoblasts was conducted after (111)indium-oxine labelling. Radioactivity retention and viability, proliferation and the ability to produce alkaline phosphatase were evaluated in a seven-day culture. In vivo labelling of implanted osteoblastic cells was conducted during a therapeutic trial of atrophic nonunion fractures, with the leakage outside the nonunion site and local uptake evolution at four, 24 and 48 hour being studied. RESULTS: The mean labelling efficiency for osteoprogenitors was 78.8 +/- 4.6 %. The intracellular retention was 89.4 +/- 2.1 % at three hours and 67.3 +/- 4.7 % at 18 hours. The viability assessed at three hours was 93.7 +/- 0.6 %. After seven days of culture, morphology and alkaline phosphatase staining were similar for both labelled and unlabelled control cells, although the proliferation rate was decreased in the labelled cells. Some local intraosseous leakage was observed in four of 17 cases. All patients showed uptake at the injection site, with four having no other uptake. Four patients showed additional uptake in the bladder, liver and spleen, while 11 patients had additional uptake in the lungs in addition to the bladder, liver and spleen. The activity ratios (injection site/body) were 48 +/- 28 % at four hours, 40 +/- 25 % at 24 hours and 35 +/- 25 % at 48 hours. After correcting for decay, the activity within the injection site was 82 +/- 15 % at 24 hours and 69 +/- 11 % at 48 hours compared with the activity measured at four hours. No relationship was found between uptake and radiological bone repair. CONCLUSIONS: The (111)indium-oxine labelling appears to be a good method for monitoring the behaviour of the osteoblastic cells after their implantation in atrophic nonunion fractures. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative capabilities of four state-of-the-art SPECT-CT cameras
Seret, Alain ULg; Nguyen, Daniel ULg; BERNARD, Claire ULg

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research (2012), 2

Background. Four state-of-the-art single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) systems, namely Philips Brightview, General Electric Discovery NM/CT 670 and Infinia Hawkeye 4 ... [more ▼]

Background. Four state-of-the-art single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) systems, namely Philips Brightview, General Electric Discovery NM/CT 670 and Infinia Hawkeye 4, and Siemens Symbia T6, were investigated in terms of accuracy of attenuation and scatter correction, contrast recovery for small hot and cold structures, and quantitative capabilities when using their dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction with attenuation and scatter corrections and resolution recovery. Methods. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-2 1994 phantom with cold air, water, and Teflon inserts, and a homemade contrast phantom with hot and cold rods were filled with 99mTc and scanned. The acquisition parameters were chosen to provide adequate linear and angular sampling and high count statistics. The data were reconstructed using Philips Astonish, General Electric Evolution for Bone, or Siemens Flash3D, eight subsets, and a varying number of iterations. A procedure similar to the one used in positron emission tomography (PET) allowed us to obtain the factor to convert counts per pixel into activity per unit volume. Results. Edge and oscillation artifacts were observed with all phantoms and all systems. At 30 iterations, the residual fraction in the inserts of the NEMA phantom fell below 3.5%. Contrast recovery increased with the number of iterations but became almost saturated at 24 iterations onwards. In the uniform part of the NEMA and contrast phantoms, a quantification error below 10% was achieved. Conclusions. In objects whose dimensions exceeded the SPECT spatial resolution by several times, quantification seemed to be feasible within 10% error limits. A partial volume effect correction strategy remains necessary for the smallest structures. The reconstruction artifacts nevertheless remain a handicap on the road towards accurate quantification in SPECT and should be the focus of further works in reconstruction tomography. [less ▲]

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See detailNodal staging of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas : impact of a dedicated PET/CT protocol.
MINON, AL.; CABAY, Jean-Evrard ULg; DEMEZ, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2012), 53(SUPPL), 1354

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See detailMetabolic activity in external and internal awareness networks in severely brain-damaged patients.
Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Chatelle, Camille ULg et al

in Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine (2012), 44(6), 487-94

OBJECTIVE: An extrinsic cerebral network (encompassing lateral frontoparietal cortices) related to external/sensory awareness and an intrinsic midline network related to internal/self-awareness have been ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: An extrinsic cerebral network (encompassing lateral frontoparietal cortices) related to external/sensory awareness and an intrinsic midline network related to internal/self-awareness have been identified recently. This study measured brain metabolism in both networks in patients with severe brain damage. DESIGN: Prospective [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised assessments in a university hospital setting. SUBJECTS: Healthy volunteers and patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS), minimally conscious state (MCS), emergence from MCS (EMCS), and locked-in syndrome (LIS). RESULTS: A total of 70 patients were included in the study: 24 VS/UWS, 28 MCS, 10 EMCS, 8 LIS and 39 age-matched controls. VS/UWS showed metabolic dysfunction in extrinsic and intrinsic networks and thalami. MCS showed dysfunction mostly in intrinsic network and thalami. EMCS showed impairment in posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortices. LIS showed dysfunction only in infratentorial regions. Coma Recovery Scale-Revised total scores correlated with metabolic activity in both extrinsic and part of the intrinsic network and thalami. CONCLUSION: Progressive recovery of extrinsic and intrinsic awareness network activity was observed in severely brain-damaged patients, ranging from VS/UWS, MCS, EMCS to LIS. The predominance of intrinsic network impairment in MCS could reflect altered internal/self-awareness in these patients, which is difficult to quantify at the bedside. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional neuroanatomy underlying the clinical subcategorization of minimally conscious state patients.
Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Boly, Mélanie ULg et al

in Journal of Neurology (2012), 259(6), 1087-98

Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) show restricted signs of awareness but are unable to communicate. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism in MCS patients and tested the hypothesis that this ... [more ▼]

Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) show restricted signs of awareness but are unable to communicate. We assessed cerebral glucose metabolism in MCS patients and tested the hypothesis that this entity can be subcategorized into MCS- (i.e., patients only showing nonreflex behavior such as visual pursuit, localization of noxious stimulation and/or contingent behavior) and MCS+ (i.e., patients showing command following).Patterns of cerebral glucose metabolism were studied using [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET in 39 healthy volunteers (aged 46 +/- 18 years) and 27 MCS patients of whom 13 were MCS- (aged 49 +/- 19 years; 4 traumatic; 21 +/- 23 months post injury) and 14 MCS+ (aged 43 +/- 19 years; 5 traumatic; 19 +/- 26 months post injury). Results were thresholded for significance at false discovery rate corrected p < 0.05.We observed a metabolic impairment in a bilateral subcortical (thalamus and caudate) and cortical (fronto-temporo-parietal) network in nontraumatic and traumatic MCS patients. Compared to MCS-, patients in MCS+ showed higher cerebral metabolism in left-sided cortical areas encompassing the language network, premotor, presupplementary motor, and sensorimotor cortices. A functional connectivity study showed that Broca's region was disconnected from the rest of the language network, mesiofrontal and cerebellar areas in MCS- as compared to MCS+ patients.The proposed subcategorization of MCS based on the presence or absence of command following showed a different functional neuroanatomy. MCS- is characterized by preserved right hemispheric cortical metabolism interpreted as evidence of residual sensory consciousness. MCS+ patients showed preserved metabolism and functional connectivity in language networks arguably reflecting some additional higher order or extended consciousness albeit devoid of clinical verbal or nonverbal expression. [less ▲]

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See detailQuantitative capabilities of current commercial SPECT-CT systems
Bernard, Claire ULg; Nguyen, Daniel ULg; Seret, Alain ULg

Poster (2011, October 27)

Aim: To assess the quantitative capabilities of commercial SPECT-CT systems with their full 3D iterative reconstruction which includes resolution recovery, attenuation and scatter corrections. Materials ... [more ▼]

Aim: To assess the quantitative capabilities of commercial SPECT-CT systems with their full 3D iterative reconstruction which includes resolution recovery, attenuation and scatter corrections. Materials and methods: A NEMA NU2-1994 attenuation and scatter correction accuracy phantom, a cylindrical phantom with uniform part, cold and hot rods (diameter 4-25 mm), three uniform cylindrical phantoms of different sizes were scanned on a Siemens Symbia T6, a Philips BrightView XCT and a GE Infinia Hawkeye 4. For each phantom, activity concentration was obtained from the technetium-99m activity measured with an activimeter and its water volume. Emission projections were collected for 128 angles over 360 in 128*128 matrix (pixel size of 2.7 mm) using the 140 keV system usual energy window, and standard CT attenuation protocol was executed. Full 3D iterative reconstructions (Siemens Flash3D, Philips Astonish, GE Evolution) were performed. Residual fraction (RF) in the cold inserts of the NEMA phantom, contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) in the cold and hot rods were computed from the images. Regions of interest (ROI) of different sizes (60-100% of the phantom physical size) were drawn on the three uniform phantoms to obtain a calibration factor (CF). Results: RF dropped below 4% and CRC almost stabilized after 18 iterations. Hot rod CRC were above 90% for the rods with a diameter larger than 16 mm rising above 100% in some cases. Accurate quantification was shown feasible to within 5% or even less on some systems. CF was found to depend on both the phantom and the ROI sizes used for its determination, with variation of a few percents to more than 10%. The best phantom/ROI combination was also dependent on the system. Conclusion: With a careful design of the calibration procedure, quantification with these SPECT-CT systems and 3D iterative reconstruction seems to be feasible. However partial volume effect will remain a concern when object size drops below 2 cm. [less ▲]

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See detailPhantom program analysis to assess the variability in PET image quantification between different PET-CT centres
Guiot, Thomas; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Wimana, Zéna et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2011, October), 38(S2), 172

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See detailViability for the Siemens Ecat HR+ of the new stability test of PET scanners elaborated by the Belgian Hospital Physicist Association
Nguyen, Daniel ULg; Dalemans, Christophe; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2011, October), 38(S2), 174

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See detailQuantitative capabilities of the Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT-CT system with iterative Flash3D reconstruction
Nguyen, Daniel ULg; Seret, Alain ULg; Bernard, Claire ULg

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2011, October), 38(S2), 223

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See detailPotentialités quantitatives et qualité d'image de la camera TEMP/TDM Siemens Symbia T6
Seret, Alain ULg; Nguyen, Daniel ULg; HUSTINX, Roland ULg et al

in Médecine Nucléaire : Imagerie Fonctionnelle et Métabolique (2011, May 07), 35

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See detailViabilité pour le Siemens ECAT EXACT HR+ du test de stabilité des tomographes TEP élaboré par la société belge des physiciens d'hôpitaux
Seret, Alain ULg; Dalemans, Christophe ULg; Nguyen, Daniel ULg et al

in Médecine Nucléaire : Imagerie Fonctionnelle et Métabolique (2011, May 07), 35

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See detailImpact of the attenuation and scatter correction methods on hot and cold contrasts obtained with the Philips Gemini PET-scanner.
Seret, Alain ULg; Nguyen, T.; Bernard, Claire ULg

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2006), 33(S2), 316

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