References of "Belkacem, K"
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See detailThe PLATO 2.0 Mission
Rauer, H.; Catala, C.; Aerts, C. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014)

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental ... [more ▼]

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, including potentially habitable planets? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes (32 with 25 s readout cadence and 2 with 2.5 s candence) providing a wide field-of-view (2232 deg 2) and a large photometric magnitude range (4–16 mag). It focusses on bright (4–11 mag) stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for these bright stars to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2 %, 4–10 % and 10 % for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The planned baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2–3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars and an additional step-and-stare phase to cover in total about 50 % of the sky. PLATO 2.0 will observe up to 1,000,000 stars and detect and characterize hundreds of small planets, and thousands of planets in the Neptune to gas giant regime out to the HZ. It will therefore provide the first large-scale catalogue of bulk characterized planets with accurate radii, masses, mean densities and ages. This catalogue will include terrestrial planets at intermediate orbital distances, where surface temperatures are moderate. Coverage of this parameter range with statistical numbers of bulk characterized planets is unique to PLATO 2.0. The PLATO 2.0 catalogue allows us to e.g.: - complete our knowledge of planet diversity for low-mass objects, - correlate the planet mean density-orbital distance distribution with predictions from planet formation theories,- constrain the influence of planet migration and scattering on the architecture of multiple systems, and - specify how planet and system parameters change with host star characteristics, such as type, metallicity and age. The catalogue will allow us to study planets and planetary systems at different evolutionary phases. It will further provide a census for small, low-mass planets. This will serve to identify objects which retained their primordial hydrogen atmosphere and in general the typical characteristics of planets in such low-mass, low-density range. Planets detected by PLATO 2.0 will orbit bright stars and many of them will be targets for future atmosphere spectroscopy exploring their atmosphere. Furthermore, the mission has the potential to detect exomoons, planetary rings, binary and Trojan planets. The planetary science possible with PLATO 2.0 is complemented by its impact on stellar and galactic science via asteroseismology as well as light curves of all kinds of variable stars, together with observations of stellar clusters of different ages. This will allow us to improve stellar models and study stellar activity. A large number of well-known ages from red giant stars will probe the structure and evolution of our Galaxy. Asteroseismic ages of bright stars for different phases of stellar evolution allow calibrating stellar age-rotation relationships. Together with the results of ESA’s Gaia mission, the results of PLATO 2.0 will provide a huge legacy to planetary, stellar and galactic science. [less ▲]

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See detailSolar-like oscillations in distant stars as seen by CoRoT : the special case of HD 42618, a solar sister
Barban, C.; Deheuvels, S.; Goupil, M. J. et al

in Journal of Physics: Conference Series (2013), 440

We report the observations of a main-sequence star, HD 42618 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5765 K, G3V) by the space telescope CoRoT. This is the closest star to the Sun ever observed by CoRoT in term of its ... [more ▼]

We report the observations of a main-sequence star, HD 42618 (T[SUB]eff[/SUB] = 5765 K, G3V) by the space telescope CoRoT. This is the closest star to the Sun ever observed by CoRoT in term of its fundamental parameters. Using a preliminary version of CoRoT light curves of HD 42618, p modes are detected around 3.2 mHz associated to l = 0, 1 and 2 modes with a large spacing of 142 μHz. Various methods are then used to derive the mass and radius of this star (scaling relations from solar values as well as comparison between theoretical and observationnal frequencies) giving values in the range of (0.80 - 1.02)M[SUB]solar[/SUB] and (0.91 - 1.01)R[SUB]solar[/SUB]. A preliminary analysis of l = 0 and 1 modes allows us also to study the amount of penetrative convection at the base of the convective envelope. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-radial, non-adiabatic solar-like oscillations in RGB and HB stars
Grosjean, Mathieu ULg; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Belkacem, K. et al

in EPJ Web of Conferences (2013, March 01), 43

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum of two red giants in ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler observations of red giants reveal rich spectra of non-radial solar-like oscillations allowing to probe their internal structure. We compare the theoretical spectrum of two red giants in the same region of the HR diagram but in different evolutionary phases. We present here our first results on the inertia, lifetimes and amplitudes of the oscillations and discuss the differences between the two stars. [less ▲]

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See detailMode lifetime and associated scaling relations
Belkacem, K.; Appourchaux, T.; Baudin, F. et al

in EPJ Web of Conferences (2013, March 01), 43

Thanks to the CoRoT and Kepler spacecrafts, scaling relations (linking seismic indices and global stellar parameters) are becoming the cornerstone of ensemble asteroseismology. Among them, the relation ... [more ▼]

Thanks to the CoRoT and Kepler spacecrafts, scaling relations (linking seismic indices and global stellar parameters) are becoming the cornerstone of ensemble asteroseismology. Among them, the relation between the cut-off frequency and the frequency of the maximum in the power spectrum of solar-like pulsators as well as the relation between mode lifetime and the effective temperature remain poorly understood. However, a solid theoretical background is essential to assess the accuracy of those relations and subsequently of the derived stellar parameters. We will thus present recent advances on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing those relations and show that the physics of mode lifetime (thus of mode damping) plays a major role. [less ▲]

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See detailAmplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red giants: Departures from the quasi-adiabatic approximation
Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in European Physical Journal Web of Conferences (2013, March 01), 43

CoRoT and Kepler measurements reveal us that the amplitudes of solar-like oscillations detected in red giant stars scale from stars to stars in a characteristic way. This observed scaling relation is not ... [more ▼]

CoRoT and Kepler measurements reveal us that the amplitudes of solar-like oscillations detected in red giant stars scale from stars to stars in a characteristic way. This observed scaling relation is not yet fully understood but constitutes potentially a powerful diagnostic about mode physics. Quasi-adiabatic theoretical scaling relations in terms of mode amplitudes result in systematic and large differences with the measurements performed for red giant stars. The use of a non-adiabatic intensity-velocity relation derived from a non-adiabatic pulsation code significantly reduces the discrepancy with the CoRoT measurements. The origin of the remaining difference is still unknown. Departure from adiabatic eigenfunction is a very likely explanation that is investigated in the present work using a 3D hydrodynamical model of the surface layers of a representative red giant star. [less ▲]

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See detailAmplitudes of solar-like oscillations in red giant stars. Evidence for non-adiabatic effects using CoRoT observations
Samadi, R.; Belkacem, K.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 543

Context. A growing number of solar-like oscillations has been detected in red giant stars thanks to the CoRoT and Kepler space-crafts. In the same way as for main-sequence stars, mode driving is ... [more ▼]

Context. A growing number of solar-like oscillations has been detected in red giant stars thanks to the CoRoT and Kepler space-crafts. In the same way as for main-sequence stars, mode driving is attributed to turbulent convection in the uppermost convective layers of those stars. <BR /> Aims: The seismic data gathered by CoRoT on red giant stars allow us to test the mode driving theory in physical conditions different from main-sequence stars. <BR /> Methods: Using a set of 3D hydrodynamical models representative of the upper layers of sub- and red giant stars, we computed the acoustic mode energy supply rate ({p_max}). Assuming adiabatic pulsations and using global stellar models that assume that the surface stratification comes from the 3D hydrodynamical models, we computed the mode amplitude in terms of surface velocity. This was converted into intensity fluctuations using either a simplified adiabatic scaling relation or a non-adiabatic one. <BR /> Results: From L and M (the luminosity and mass), the energy supply rate {p_max} is found to scale as (L/M)[SUP]2.6[/SUP] for both main-sequence and red giant stars, extending previous results. The theoretical amplitudes in velocity under-estimate the Doppler velocity measurements obtained so far from the ground for red giant stars by about 30%. In terms of intensity, the theoretical scaling law based on the adiabatic intensity-velocity scaling relation results in an under-estimation by a factor of about 2.5 with respect to the CoRoT seismic measurements. On the other hand, using the non-adiabatic intensity-velocity relation significantly reduces the discrepancy with the CoRoT data. The theoretical amplitudes remain 40% below, however, the CoRoT measurements. <BR /> Conclusions: Our results show that scaling relations of mode amplitudes cannot be simply extended from main-sequence to red giant stars in terms of intensity on the basis of adiabatic relations because non-adiabatic effects for red giant stars are important and cannot be neglected. We discuss possible reasons for the remaining differences. [less ▲]

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See detailDamping rates of solar-like oscillations across the HR diagram. Theoretical calculations confronted to CoRoT and Kepler observations
Belkacem, K.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg; Baudin, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2012), 540

The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are providing a rich harvest of high-quality constraints on solar-like pulsators. Among the seismic parameters, mode damping rates remains poorly understood and ... [more ▼]

The space-borne missions CoRoT and Kepler are providing a rich harvest of high-quality constraints on solar-like pulsators. Among the seismic parameters, mode damping rates remains poorly understood and are thus barely used to infer the physical properties of stars. Nevertheless, thanks to the CoRoT and Kepler spacecrafts it is now possible to measure damping rates for hundreds of main-sequence and thousands of red-giant stars with unprecedented precision. By using a non-adiabatic pulsation code including a time-dependent convection treatment, we compute damping rates for stellar models that are representative of solar-like pulsators from the main-sequence to the red-giant phase. This allows us to reproduce the observations of both CoRoT and Kepler, which validates our modeling of mode damping rates and thus the underlying physical mechanisms included in the modeling. By considering the perturbations of turbulent pressure and entropy (including the perturbation of the dissipation rate of turbulent energy into heat) by the oscillation in our computation, we succeed in reproducing the observed relation between damping rates and effective temperature. Moreover, we discuss the physical reasons for mode damping rates to scale with effective temperature, as observationally exhibited. Finally, this opens the way for the use of mode damping rates to probe turbulent convection in solar-like stars. [less ▲]

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See detailMixed modes in red-giant stars observed with CoRoT
Mosser, B.; Barban, C.; Montalban Iglesias, Josefa ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 532

Context. The CoRoT mission has provided thousands of red-giant light curves. The analysis of their solar-like oscillations allows us to characterize their stellar properties. <BR /> Aims: Up to now, the ... [more ▼]

Context. The CoRoT mission has provided thousands of red-giant light curves. The analysis of their solar-like oscillations allows us to characterize their stellar properties. <BR /> Aims: Up to now, the global seismic parameters of the pressure modes have been unable to distinguish red-clump giants from members of the red-giant branch. As recently done with Kepler red giants, we intend to analyze and use the so-called mixed modes to determine the evolutionary status of the red giants observed with CoRoT. We also aim at deriving different seismic characteristics depending on evolution. <BR /> Methods: The complete identification of the pressure eigenmodes provided by the red-giant universal oscillation pattern allows us to aim at the mixed modes surrounding the ℓ = 1 expected eigenfrequencies. A dedicated method based on the envelope autocorrelation function is proposed to analyze their period separation. <BR /> Results: We have identified the mixed-mode signature separation thanks to their pattern that is compatible with the asymptotic law of gravity modes. We have shown that, independent of any modeling, the g-mode spacings help to distinguish the evolutionary status of a red-giant star. We then report the different seismic and fundamental properties of the stars, depending on their evolutionary status. In particular, we show that high-mass stars of the secondary clump present very specific seismic properties. We emphasize that stars belonging to the clump were affected by significant mass loss. We also note significant population and/or evolution differences in the different fields observed by CoRoT. The CoRoT space mission, launched 2006 December 27, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Programs of ESA, ESAŠs RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany, and Spain.Apeendix A is available in electronic form at <A href="http://www.aanda.org">http://www.aanda.org</A> [less ▲]

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See detailThe underlying physical meaning of the νmax - νc relation
Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.; Dupret, Marc-Antoine ULg et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 530

Asteroseismology of stars that exhibit solar-like oscillations are enjoying a growing interest with the wealth of observational results obtained with the CoRoT and Kepler missions. In this framework ... [more ▼]

Asteroseismology of stars that exhibit solar-like oscillations are enjoying a growing interest with the wealth of observational results obtained with the CoRoT and Kepler missions. In this framework, scaling laws between asteroseismic quantities and stellar parameters are becoming essential tools to study a rich variety of stars. However, the physical underlying mechanisms of those scaling laws are still poorly known. Our objective is to provide a theoretical basis for the scaling between the frequency of the maximum in the power spectrum (ν[SUB]max[/SUB]) of solar-like oscillations and the cut-off frequency (ν[SUB]c[/SUB]). Using the SoHO GOLF observations together with theoretical considerations, we first confirm that the maximum of the height in oscillation power spectrum is determined by the so-called plateau of the damping rates. The physical origin of the plateau can be traced to the destabilizing effect of the Lagrangian perturbation of entropy in the upper-most layers, which becomes important when the modal period and the local thermal relaxation time-scale are comparable. Based on this analysis, we then find a linear relation between ν[SUB]max[/SUB] and ν[SUB]c[/SUB], with a coefficient that depends on the ratio of the Mach number of the exciting turbulence to the third power to the mixing-length parameter. [less ▲]

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See detailAmplitudes and lifetimes of solar-like oscillations observed by CoRoT. Red-giant versus main-sequence stars
Baudin, F.; Barban, C.; Belkacem, K. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 529

Context. The advent of space-borne missions such as CoRoT or Kepler providing photometric data has brought new possibilities for asteroseismology across the H-R diagram. Solar-like oscillations are now ... [more ▼]

Context. The advent of space-borne missions such as CoRoT or Kepler providing photometric data has brought new possibilities for asteroseismology across the H-R diagram. Solar-like oscillations are now observed in many stars, including red giants and main-sequence stars. Aims: Based on several hundred identified pulsating red giants, we aim to characterize their oscillation amplitudes and widths. These observables are compared with those of main-sequence stars in order to test trends and scaling laws for these parameters for main-sequence stars and red giants. Methods: An automated fitting procedure is used to analyze several hundred Fourier spectra. For each star, a modeled spectrum is fitted to the observed oscillation spectrum, and mode parameters are derived. Results: Amplitudes and widths of red-giant solar-like oscillations are estimated for several hundred modes of oscillation. Amplitudes are relatively high (several hundred ppm) and widths relatively small (very few tenths of a μHz). Conclusions: Widths measured in main-sequence stars show a different variation with the effective temperature from red giants. A single scaling law is derived for mode amplitudes of red giants and main-sequence stars versus their luminosity to mass ratio. However, our results suggest that two regimes may also be compatible with the observations. [less ▲]

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See detailSolar-Like Oscillations in a Massive Star
Belkacem, K.; Samadi, R.; Goupil, M.-J. et al

in Science (2009), 324

Seismology of stars provides insight into the physical mechanisms taking place in their interior, with modes of oscillation probing different layers. Low-amplitude acoustic oscillations excited by ... [more ▼]

Seismology of stars provides insight into the physical mechanisms taking place in their interior, with modes of oscillation probing different layers. Low-amplitude acoustic oscillations excited by turbulent convection were detected four decades ago in the Sun and more recently in low-mass main-sequence stars. Using data gathered by the Convection Rotation and Planetary Transits mission, we report here on the detection of solar-like oscillations in a massive star, V1449 Aql, which is a known large-amplitude (beta Cephei) pulsator. [less ▲]

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