References of "Beguin, Yves"
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See detailThe use of mesenchymal stromal cells in solid organ transplantation
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; Jouret, François ULg et al

in The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (in press)

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See detailThe role of mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease
GREGOIRE, Céline ULg; Louis, Edouard ULg; BRIQUET, Alexandra ULg et al

in The Biology and Therapeutic Applications of Mesenchymal Cells (in press)

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See detailValidation of a multicolor staining to monitor phosphoSTAT5 levels in regulatory T-cell subsets
Ehx, Grégory ULg; Hannon, Muriel ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg et al

in Oncotarget (2015)

BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key players in immune tolerance. They express the transcription factor FOXP3 and are dependent of the STAT5 signaling for their homeostasis. So far, the study of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key players in immune tolerance. They express the transcription factor FOXP3 and are dependent of the STAT5 signaling for their homeostasis. So far, the study of phosphorylated epitopes by flow cytometry required treating the cells with methanol, which is harmful for several epitopes. METHODS: Here we assessed whether the PerFix EXPOSE reagent kit (PFE) (Beckman Coulter) allowed monitoring the phosphorylation level of STAT5 in Treg subpopulations together with complex immunophenotyping. Results observed with the PFE kit were compared to those observed without cell permeabilization for surface markers, with paraformaldehyde permeabilization for non-phosphorylated intracellular epitopes, and with methanol-based permeabilization for phosphoSTAT5 staining. RESULTS: In human PBMCs, the PFE kit allowed the detection of surface antigens, FOXP3, KI67 and phosphoSTAT5 in similar proportions to what was observed without permeabilization (for surface antigens), or with PFA or methanol permeabilizations for FOXP3/KI67 and phosphoSTAT5, respectively. Comparable observations were made with murine splenocytes. Further, the PFE kit allowed determining the response of different human and murine Treg subsets to IL-2. It also allowed demonstrating that human Treg subsets with the highest levels of phosphoSTAT5 had also the highest suppressive activity in vitro, and that anti-thymocyte glogulin (ATG) induced Treg independently of the STAT5 pathway, both in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: We have validated a multicolor staining method that allows monitoring phosphoSTAT5 levels in Treg subsets. This staining could be useful to monitor responses of various Treg subsets to IL-2 therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailFamilial thyrogastric autoimmune syndrome : a study of 22 kindreds
Sid, Sélim ULg; LUTTERI, Laurence ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg et al

in Abstract book - 20th Annual Congress of the Belgian Society of Internal Medicine (2015, December)

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See detailL'Azacytidine comme traitement de la maladie du greffon contre l'hôte de type chronique sclérodermique expérimentale.
Fransolet, Gilles ULg; Ehx, Grégory ULg; SOMJA, Joan ULg et al

Conference (2015, November 19)

Introduction: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has remained a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the last decades. Following unmanipulated peripheral-blood ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has remained a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for the last decades. Following unmanipulated peripheral-blood stem cell transplantation, 60% of the patients experience chronic GVHD while approximately 15% of them develop a sclerodermic form of chronic GVHD characterized by multiple organ fibrosis and loss of skin elasticity. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal protective role in the pathogenesis of chronic GVHD by inhibiting alloreactive conventional T cells (Tconvs). Several studies have shown that hypomethylating agents such as azacytidine (Aza) can demethylate the master transcription factor of Treg (Forkhead box protein 3 factor, FoxP3), thus promoting Treg differentiation from Tconvs. This work investigates the impact of Aza in a classical murine model of sclerodermic chronic GVHD (B10.D2  BALB/cJ). Methods: In vitro analyses have been performed to determine the impact of Aza on collagen production. NIH-3T3 fibroblastic cells were plated and stimulated with 50 ng of PDGF or 10 ng of TGF-beta. Cells were then cultured with various concentrations of Aza for 48 hours. After culture, cells were stained with Sirius Red before quantification of collagen amount by absorbance at 490 nm. For in vivo experiments, lethally irradiated (7 Gy) BALB/cJ recipient mice were injected with 107 bone marrow cells + 7.107splenocytes from B10.D2 donor mice to induce scl-cGVHD. Recipients were injected with either 0,5 or 2 mg/kg of Aza every 48 hours from day 10 to 30 following transplantation. GVHD was scored using a five criteria scale (weight loss, activity, fibrosis, hair loss and mice posture; 0-1-2 points/criteria). Mice were sacrificed at a score of 8/10 (or > 20% weight loss) or at day 52 after transplantation (end of experiment). Results: Concerning in vitro analyses, results suggest a decreased production of collagen at higher concentration of Aza with both stimulations (seen by a gradual diminution of absorbance). For in vivo experiments, mice treated with Aza 0.5 mg/kg (n = 14) or 2 mg/kg (n = 25) had significant lower clinical scores of GVHD compared to control ones (n = 23) after treatment. FACS analysis showed a higher proportion of Treg among CD4+ T cells in the blood of Aza 2 mg/kg mice than in control mice at day 35 following transplantation (P = 0.047), as well as a higher percentage of Tregs expressing the KI67 proliferative marker on the same time point (P = 0.0005). Finally, analyses of the cellular blood components with Cell-dyn demonstrated that Aza 2 mg/kg treated mice were significantly lymphopenic as compared to control mice at day 35 after transplantation (P = 0.05). Conclusion : Aza prevented sclerodermic GVHD in this classical murine model of chronic GVHD. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-party mesenchymal stem cell infusion in kidney transplant recipient: 6-month safety interim analysis
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 223-224278

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) have immunomodulating properties and could be used as immunosuppressive agents. We report the 6- month safety results for the 5 first patients treated with MSC after kidney transplantation (KTx). Here, we address 3 specific safety issues: immunization against MSC and engraftment syndrome defined as acute graft dysfunction not related to rejection and over-immunosuppression. Patients and method: MSC production was carried out locally. MSC were not matched with kidney recipients’ HLA. Included patients were non-immunized, first transplant recipients from deceased donors. MSC (1.5–3.0 9 106/kg) infusion was planned 3 to 5 days post KTx. Patients with cardiovascular instability post KTx were excluded. All patients were treated with Basiliximab induction, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil and Steroid. We prospectively screened for anti-HLA antibodies at month 1, 3 and 6. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. The local ethical committee approved the protocol. Results: Collectively there were 23/50 and 29/50 HLA mismatches (MM) with kidney and MSC donor respectively, out of which 5 were shared MM. One patient developed de novo DSA, 2 patients anti-HLA antibodies against shared kidney/MSC MM and 1 patient developed 2 specific antibodies against MSC (MSCSA) at month 6. All antibodies were anti HLA class I except for 1. We did not observe any “engraftment” syndrome. Three patients experienced non- severe opportunistic infections: 1 CMV reactivation and 2 polyoma-BK virus viremia.Conclusion: We did not observe any strong safety signal. We did however observe some degree of immunization in 3 patients: 2 developed antibodies against shared kidney/MSC donor HLA MM and 1 MSCSA. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 1027

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Methods: 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third party MSC on post-operative day 3 ` 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. This study is in part supported by an ESOT Senior Clinical Research Grant and by the University of Liege. [less ▲]

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See detailPrise en charge actuelle du lymphome de la zone marginale
Bonnet, Christophe ULg; LEJEUNE, Marie ULg; VAN KEMSEKE, Catherine ULg et al

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2015)

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See detailImmune Recovery after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation following Flu-TBI versus TLI-ATG Conditioning
HANNON, Muriel ULg; BEGUIN, Yves ULg; Ehx, Grégory ULg et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2015), 21(14), 3131-9

Purpose: A conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) combining total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) plus anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been develop to induce graft ... [more ▼]

Purpose: A conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) combining total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) plus anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been develop to induce graft-versus-tumor effects without graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Experimental Design: We compared immune recovery in 53 patients included in a phase II randomized study comparing nonmyeloablative HCT following either fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI arm, n=28) or 8 Gy TLI plus anti-thymocyte globulin (TLI arm, n=25). Results: In comparison to TBI patients, TLI patients had a similarly low 6-month incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD, a lower incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD (P=0.02), a higher incidence of CMV reactivation (P<0.001), and a higher incidence of relapse (P=0.01). While recovery of total CD8+ T cells was similar in the two groups, with median CD8+ T cell counts reaching the normal values 40-60 days after allo-HCT, TLI patients had lower percentages of naïve CD8 T cells. Median CD4+ T cell counts did not reach the lower limit of normal values the first year after allo-HCT in the two groups. Further, CD4+ T cell counts were significantly lower in TLI than in TBI patients the first 6 months after transplantation. Interestingly, while median absolute regulatory T cell (Treg) counts were comparable in TBI and TLI patients, Treg/naïve CD4+ T cell ratios were significantly higher in TLI than in TBI patients the 2 first years after transplantation. Conclusions: Immune recovery differs substantially between these two conditioning regimens possibly explaining the different clinical outcomes observed (NCT00603954). [less ▲]

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See detailThird-party mesenchymal stem cell infusion in kidney transplant recipient: 6-month safety interim analysis
WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; ERPICUM, Pauline ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg et al

in American Journal of Transplantation (2015, May), 15(suppl 3),

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stromal cells after liver transplantation: a phase 1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 27)

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases ... [more ▼]

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing bone marrow progenitors that have been shown both in vitro and in vivo as capable of (i) immunomodulation, (ii) anti-inflammation in case of ischemia/reperfusion injury, and (ii) stimulation of tissue repair. MSC could therefore be very interesting in organ recipients to limit chronic graft damage and to allow tolerance. This study aimed to be the first clinical evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled, phase I study. Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post- operative day 3 ± 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. This phase I study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging myeloma and related monoclonal plasma cell disorders using MRI, low dose whole-body CT and FDG PET/CT
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; NANNI, C.; SIMONI, Paolo ULg et al

in Clinical and Translational Imaging (2015)

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial ... [more ▼]

A majority of multiple myeloma patients present with osteolytic bone lesions that can cause bone pain, fractures or hypercalcaemia. Correct identification of these lesions is important in the initial assessment of the disease. <br />Although the radiological skeletal survey is the gold standard to detect bone osteolytic lesions, it may miss small bone lesions or lesions located in the spine or pelvis due to the superimposed images of soft tissues. These limitations propelled newer imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. In addition, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT and MRI have prognostic value and can be used to monitor disease. <br />This review discusses the additional value of PET/CT and MRI in the management of MM. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 29

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Patients & Methods: Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (2 ULg)