References of "Beer, Martin"
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See detailDetection of Usutu virus in a bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) and a great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) in north-west Europe
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Marlier, Didier ULg; Tenner-Racz, Klara et al

in Veterinary Journal (2014), 199

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were ... [more ▼]

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were found 4 km from each other and 5 days apart in the Meuse Valley, Belgium. Non-suppurative encephalitis and mild degeneration and necrosis were identified in the brain and cerebellum, and Usutu virus antigen and RNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, respectively. The two cases reported here represent the most western distribution of clinical disease in birds due to Usutu virus. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Usutu virus in a bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) and a great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) in north-west Europe
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Marlier, Didier ULg; Tenner-Racz, Klara et al

in Veterinary Journal (2014), 199

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were ... [more ▼]

In October 2012, a 3-year-old bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) held in captivity for its entire lifespan and a wild adult great spotted woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), both with neurological signs, were found 4 km from each other and 5 days apart in the Meuse Valley, Belgium. Non-suppurative encephalitis and mild degeneration and necrosis were identified in the brain and cerebellum, and Usutu virus antigen and RNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, respectively. The two cases reported here represent the most western distribution of clinical disease in birds due to Usutu virus. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in wild boars, Belgium, 2010-2012
Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Beer, Martin et al

in Lecoq, Yves (Ed.) 31th Congress of the International Union of Game Biologists (2013, August 27)

In the summer/fall of 2011, a nonspecific febrile syndrome characterized by hyperthermia and drop in milk production with occasional reports of watery diarrhea and abortion was reported among dairy cows ... [more ▼]

In the summer/fall of 2011, a nonspecific febrile syndrome characterized by hyperthermia and drop in milk production with occasional reports of watery diarrhea and abortion was reported among dairy cows on farms in northwestern Europe. Further, in November 2011, an enzootic outbreak of malformed neonates emerged in several European countries, with stillbirth and birth at term of lambs, kids and calves with neurological signs or malformations of the head, spine, or limbs. Both syndromes were associated with the presence in the blood (adults) or in the central nervous system (newborns) of a new Shamonda/Sathuperi-like orthobunyavirus, provisionally named Schmallenberg virus (SBV) after the town in Germany where the first positive clinical samples were identified. Defining as precisely as possible the host range of the newcomer is a key point to predict the outcome of the emergence of SBV disease in Europe. In this respect, it must be pointed out that orthobunyaviruses infect more animal species than those in which the foetus is damaged. Recently, serological evidence for SBV infection in wild ruminant species (Cervus elaphus and Capreolus capreolus) was reported (Linden et al., 2012). In the present study, the objective was to seek after serological evidence of SBV infection among wild boars living in a geographical area where exposure to infected insect vectors was high in 2011, as judged from the very high seroprevalence reported among cattle in that region. About 700 animals were sampled during the 2010-2012 hunting seasons. All serum samples collected during the fall of 2010 were seronegative. On the contrary, apparent seroprevalence among wild boars in 2011 was ~27% and started to decline in 2012 (~11%). Acquired immunity against the new virus was thus already very high in the wild boar populations sampled in the fall 2011, suggesting that the new virus had quickly spread throughout the region since its emergence about 250 km northeast in the late summer 2011. The drop in seroprevalence recorded in 2012 suggests that the virus was no more circulating in the region. [less ▲]

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See detailEpizootic spread of emerging Schmallenberg virus in wild cervids, Belgium, fall 2011
Linden, Annick ULg; Desmecht, Daniel ULg; Volpe, Rosario ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(12), 2006-2008

The Schmallenberg virus emerged in summer-fall 2011 in North-West Europe. During the fall of 2011, the virus widely spread in red and roe deer populations living about 250 km from the emergence location.

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See detailSchmallenberg virus in calf born at term with porencephaly, Belgium
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULg; Hoffmann, Bernd; Dive, Marc et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2012), 18(6), 1005-1006

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (15 ULg)