References of "Beckers, Jean-Marie"
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See detailOceanBrowser: on-line visualization of gridded ocean data and in situ observations
Barth, Alexander ULg; Watelet, Sylvain ULg; Troupin, Charles et al

Conference (2016, October)

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See detailAnalysis of Ocean in Situ Observations and Web - Based Visualization: From Individual Measurements to an Integrated View
Barth, Alexander ULg; Watelet, Sylvain ULg; Troupin, Charles et al

in Diviacco, Paolo; Leadbetter, Adam; Glaves, Helen (Eds.) Oceanographic and Marine Cross-Domain Data Management for Sustainable Development (2016)

The sparsity of observations poses a challenge common to various ocean disciplines. Even for physical parameters where the spatial and temporal coverage is higher, current observational networks ... [more ▼]

The sparsity of observations poses a challenge common to various ocean disciplines. Even for physical parameters where the spatial and temporal coverage is higher, current observational networks undersample a broad spectrum of scales. This situation is generally more severe for chemical and biological parameters because such sensors are less widely deployed. The present chapter describes the analysis tool DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) which is designed to generate gridded fields from in situ observations. DIVA has been applied to various physical (temperature and salinity), chemical (concentration of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate) and biological parameters (abundance of a species). The chapter also shows the technologies used to visualize the gridded fields. Visualization of analyses from in situ observations provide a unique set of challenges since the accuracy of the analysed field is not spatially uniform as it strongly depends on the location of the observations. In addition, an adequate treatment of the depth and time dimensions is essential. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of SMOS sea surface salinity data using DINEOF
Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg; Parard, Gaëlle ULg et al

in Remote Sensing of Environment (2016), 180

n analysis of daily Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) at 0.15 ° × 0.15° spatial resolution from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission using DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal ... [more ▼]

n analysis of daily Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) at 0.15 ° × 0.15° spatial resolution from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission using DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions) is presented. DINEOF allows reconstructing missing data using a truncated EOF basis, while reducing the amount of noise and errors in geophysical datasets. This work represents a first application of DINEOF to SMOS SSS. Results show that a reduction of the error and the amount of noise is obtained in the DINEOF SSS data compared to the initial SMOS SSS data. Errors associated to the edge of the swath are detected in 2 EOFs and effectively removed from the final data, avoiding removing the data at the edges of the swath in the initial dataset. The final dataset presents a centered root mean square error of 0.2 in open waters when comparing with thermosalinograph data at their original spatial and temporal resolution. Constant biases present near land masses, large scale biases and latitudinal biases cannot be corrected with DINEOF because persistent signals are retained in high order EOFs, and therefore these need to be corrected separately. The signature of the Douro and Gironde rivers is detected in the DINEOF SSS. The minimum SSS observed in the Gironde plume corresponds to a flood event in June 2013, and the shape and size of the Douro river shows a good agreement with chlorophyll-a satellite data. These examples show the capacity of DINEOF to remove noise and provide a full SSS dataset at a high temporal and spatial resolution with reduced error, and the possibility to retrieve physical signals in zones with high initial errors. [less ▲]

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See detailData-Interpolating Variational Analysis (DIVA) software: recent development and application
Watelet, Sylvain ULg; Back, Örjan; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Poster (2016, April 20)

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See detailReconstruction and analysis of long-term satellite-derived sea surface temperature for the South China Sea
Huynh, Thi Hong Ngu ULg; Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

in Journal of Oceanography (2016)

Sea surface temperature (SST) is one of the key variables often used to investigate ocean dynamics, ocean-atmosphere interaction, and climate change. Unfortunately, the SST data sources in the South China ... [more ▼]

Sea surface temperature (SST) is one of the key variables often used to investigate ocean dynamics, ocean-atmosphere interaction, and climate change. Unfortunately, the SST data sources in the South China Sea (SCS) are not abundant due to sparse measurements of in situ SST and a high percentage of missing data in the satellite-derived SST. Therefore, SST data sets with low resolution and/or a short-term period have often been used in previous researches. Here we used Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions, a self-consistent and parameter-free method for filling in missing data, to reconstruct the daily nighttime 4-km AVHRR Pathfinder SST for the long-term period spanning from 1989 to 2009. In addition to the reconstructed field, we also estimated the local error map for each reconstructed image. Comparisons between the reconstructed and other data sets (satellite-derived microwave and in situ SSTs) show that the results are reliable for use in many different researches, such as validating numerical models, or identifying and tracking meso-scale oceanic features. Moreover, the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of the reconstructed SST and the reconstructed SST anomalies clearly shows the subseasonal, seasonal, and interannual variability of SST under the influence of monsoon and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), as well as reveals some oceanic features that could not be captured well in previous EOF analyses. The SCS SST often lags ENSO by about half a year. However, in this study, we see that the time lag changes with the frequencies of the SST variability, from 1 to 6 months. [less ▲]

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See detailDecline of the Black Sea oxygen inventory
Capet, Arthur; Stanev, Emil; Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg et al

in Biogeosciences (2016), 13

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See detailAssimilation of sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift in a model of the Southern Ocean
Barth, Alexander ULg; Canter, Martin ULg; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert et al

in Ocean Modelling (2015), 93

Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice ... [more ▼]

Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift. In the following it is also shown how surface winds in the Southern Ocean can be improved using sea ice drift estimated from infrared radiometers. Such satellite observations are available since the late seventies and have the potential to improve the wind forcing before more direct measurements of winds over the ocean are available using scatterometry in the late nineties. The model results are compared to the assimilated data and to independent measurements (the World Ocean Database 2009 and the mean dynamic topography based on observations). The overall improvement of the assimilation is quantified, in particular the impact of the assimilation on the representation of the polar front is discussed. Finally a method to identify model errors in the Antarctic sea ice area is proposed based on Model Output Statistics techniques using a series of potential predictors. This approach provides new directions for model improvements. [less ▲]

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See detailBenthic-Planktonic age biases: theoretical and modeling studies
Mouchet, Anne ULg; Deleersnijder, Eric; Delhez, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2015, June 25)

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See detailEMODnet regional gridded abundance products: a tool to facilitate ecosystem assessments
CLAUS, SIMON; TYBERGHEIN, LENNERT; HERMAN, PETER et al

Scientific conference (2015, February 20)

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See detailEMODnet regional gridded abundance products: a tool to facilitate ecosystem assessments
Beckers, Jean-Marie ULg

Scientific conference (2015, February 20)

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See detailAssimilation of sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift in a model of the Southern Ocean
Barth, Alexander ULg; Canter, Martin ULg; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert et al

Poster (2015)

Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice ... [more ▼]

Current ocean models have relatively large errors and biases in the Southern Ocean. The aim of this study is to provide a reanalysis from 1985 to 2006 assimilating sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift. In the following it is also shown how surface winds in the Southern Ocean can be improved using sea ice drift es- timated from infrared radiometers. Such satellite observations are available since the late seventies and have the potential to improve the wind forcing before more direct measure- ments of winds over the ocean are available using scatterometry in the late nineties. The model results are compared to the assimilated data and to independent measurements (the World Ocean Database 2009 and the mean dynamic topography based on observations). The overall improvement of the assimilation is quantified, in particular the impact of the assimilation on the representation of the polar front is discussed. Finally a method to iden- tify model errors in the Antarctic sea ice area is proposed based on Model Output Statistics techniques using a series of potential predictors. This approach provides new directions for model improvements. [less ▲]

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See detailThe SANGOMA Tools for Data Assimilation
Nerger, Lars; Altaf, Umer; Barth, Alexander ULg et al

Poster (2015)

The EU-funded project SANGOMA – Stochastic Assimilation of the Next Gener- ation Ocean Model Applications –provides new developments in data assimilation to ensure that future operational systems can make ... [more ▼]

The EU-funded project SANGOMA – Stochastic Assimilation of the Next Gener- ation Ocean Model Applications –provides new developments in data assimilation to ensure that future operational systems can make use of state-of-the-art data-assimilation methods and related analysis tools. One task of SANGOMA is to develop a collection of common tools for data assimilation with a uniform interface so that the tools are usable from dif- ferent data assimilation systems. The tool developments mainly aim at tools that support ensemble-based data assimilation applications like for the generation of perturbations, to perform transformations, to compute diagnostics, as well as further utilities. In addition, a selection of ensemble filter analysis steps is included. The tools are implemented in Fortran and as scripts for Matlab or Octave. They are provided as free open-source programs via the project web site [http://www.data-assimilation.net]. This contribution provides an overview of the tools that are available in the latest release V1 of the SANGOMA tools as well as the plans for the next release. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal ensemble assimilation scheme with global constraints and conservation
Barth, Alexander ULg; Yan, Yajing ULg; Canter, Martin ULg et al

Conference (2015)

Ensemble assimilation schemes applied in their original, global formulation have no problem in respecting linear conservation properties if the ensemble perturbations are setup accordingly. For realistic ... [more ▼]

Ensemble assimilation schemes applied in their original, global formulation have no problem in respecting linear conservation properties if the ensemble perturbations are setup accordingly. For realistic ocean systems, only a relatively small number of ensemble members can be calculated. A localization of the ensemble increment is thus necessary to filter out spurious long-range correlations. However, the conservation of the global property will be lost if the assimilation is performed locally since the conservation requires a coupling between model grid points, which is filtered out by the localization. In the ocean, the distribution of observations is highly inhomogeneous. System- atic errors of the observed parts of the ocean state can lead to spurious systematic adjust- ments of the non-observed part of the ocean state due to data assimilation. As a result, global properties which should be conserved, increase or decrease in long-term simulations. We propose an assimilation scheme (with stochastic or deterministic analysis steps) which is formulated globally (i.e. for the whole state vector) but where spurious long-range correlations can be filtered out. The scheme can thus be used to enforce global conservation properties and non-local observation operators. Both aspects are indeed linked since one can introduce the global conservation as a weak constraint by using a global ob- servation operator. The conserved property becomes thus an observed value. The proposed scheme is tested with the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky model which is conservative. The benefit compared to the traditional covariance localization scheme (with an ad-hoc step enforcing conservation) where observations are assimilated sequentially is shown. The assimilation scheme is suitable to be implemented on parallel computers where the number of available computing cores is a multiple of the ensemble size. [less ▲]

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See detailAssimilation of sea surface temperature, sea ice concentration and sea ice drift in a model of the Southern Ocean
Barth, Alexander ULg; Canter; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert et al

Conference (2015)

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See detailWeb-based visualization of gridded dataset usings OceanBrowser
Barth, Alexander ULg; Watelet, Sylvain ULg; Troupin, Charles ULg et al

Conference (2015)

OceanBrowser is a web-based visualization tool for gridded oceanographic data sets. Those data sets are typically four-dimensional (longitude, latitude, depth and time). OceanBrowser allows one to ... [more ▼]

OceanBrowser is a web-based visualization tool for gridded oceanographic data sets. Those data sets are typically four-dimensional (longitude, latitude, depth and time). OceanBrowser allows one to visualize horizontal sections at a given depth and time to examine the horizontal distribution of a given variable. It also offers the possibility to display the results on an arbitrary vertical section. To study the evolution of the variable in time, the horizontal and vertical sections can also be animated. Vertical section can be generated by using a fixed distance from coast or fixed ocean depth. The user can customize the plot by changing the color-map, the range of the color-bar, the type of the plot (linearly interpolated color, simple contours, filled contours) and download the current view as a simple image or as Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file for visualization in applications such as Google Earth. The data products can also be accessed as NetCDF files and through OPeNDAP. Third-party layers from a web map service can also be integrated. OceanBrowser is used in the frame of the SeaDataNet project (http://gher-diva.phys.ulg.ac.be/web-vis/) and EMODNET Chemistry (http://oceanbrowser.net/emodnet/) to distribute gridded data sets interpolated from in situ observation using DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis). [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of high frequency geostationary ocean colour data using DINEOF
Alvera Azcarate, Aïda ULg; Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin et al

in Estuarine Coastal & Shelf Science (2015), 159

DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions), a technique to reconstruct missing data, is applied to turbidity data obtained through the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI ... [more ▼]

DINEOF (Data Interpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions), a technique to reconstruct missing data, is applied to turbidity data obtained through the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation 2. The aim of this work is to assess if the tidal variability of the southern North Sea in 2008 can be accurately reproduced in the reconstructed dataset. Such high frequency data have not previously been analysed with DINEOF and present new challenges, like a strong tidal signal and long night-time gaps. An outlier detection approach that exploits the high temporal resolution (15 min) of the SEVIRI dataset is developed. After removal of outliers, the turbidity dataset is reconstructed with DINEOF. In situ Smartbuoy data are used to assess the accuracy of the reconstruction. Then, a series of tidal cycles are examined at various positions over the southern North Sea. These examples demonstrate the capability of DINEOF to reproduce tidal variability in the reconstructed dataset, and show the high temporal and spatial variability of turbidity in the southern North Sea. An analysis of the main harmonic constituents (annual cycle, daily cycle, M2 and S2 tidal components) is performed, to assess the contribution of each of these modes to the total variability of turbidity. The variability not explained by the harmonic fit, due to the natural processes and satellite processing errors as noise, is also assessed. [less ▲]

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