References of "Beckers, Catherine"
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See detailFluoride PET-CT.
Hustinx, Roland ULg; Beckers, Catherine ULg

in Fanti, Stefano; Farsad, Mohsen; Mansi, Luigi (Eds.) PET-CT Beyond FDG. (2010)

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See detailPET/CT for assessing bone involvement in prostate and breast cancer.
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; GRAYET, Benjamin ULg; TANCREDI, T. et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2008), 49(SUPPL), 21

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See detailFDG PET/CT for diagnostic arterial prosthetic graft infection : preliminary report.
NAMUR, Gauthier ULg; VAN DAMME, Hendrik ULg; BECKERS, Catherine ULg et al

in PROCEEDINGS OF XIIIth SYMPOSIUM OF THE BELGIAN SOCIETY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE (2007, May)

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See detailF-18-FDG PET imaging of rheumatoid knee synovitis correlates with dynamic magnetic resonance and sonographic assessments as well as with the serum level of metalloproteinase-3
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Jeukens, Xavier; Ribbens, Clio ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (2006), 33(3), 275-280

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). Methods: Sixteen knees in 16 patients with active RA were assessed with PET, MRI and US at baseline and 4 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF-alpha treatment. All studies were performed within 4 days. Visual and semi-quantitative (standardised uptake value, SUV) analyses of the synovial uptake of FDG were performed. The dynamic enhancement rate and the static enhancement were measured after i.v. gadolinium injection and the synovial thickness was measured in the medial, lateral patellar and suprapatellar recesses by US. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) were also measured. Results: PET was positive in 69% of knees while MRI and US were positive in 69% and 75%. Positivity on one imaging technique was strongly associated with positivity on the other two. PET-positive knees exhibited significantly higher SUVs, higher MRI parameters and greater synovial thickness compared with PET-negative knees, whereas serum CRP and MMP-3 levels were not significantly different. SUVs were significantly correlated with all MRI parameters, with synovial thickness and with serum CRP and MMP-3 levels at baseline. Changes in SUVs after 4 weeks were also correlated with changes in MRI parameters and in serum CRP and MMP-3 levels, but not with changes in synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique for assessing the metabolic activity of synovitis. The PET findings are correlated with MRI and US assessments of the pannus in RA, as well as with the classical serum parameter of inflammation, CRP, and the synovium-derived parameter, serum MMP-3. Further studies are warranted to establish the place of metabolic imaging of synovitis in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailTime-course study of (F-18)-FDG uptake in psoriatic synovitis.
BECKERS, Catherine ULg; BERNARD, C.; KAISER, Marie-Joëlle ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2005), 46(SUPPL), 183

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See detailAssessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis with 18F-FDG PET
Beckers, Catherine ULg; Ribbens, Clio ULg; Andre, Béatrice ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2004), 45(6), 956-964

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess synovitis by F-18-FDG PET in an individual joint analysis and in a global analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and to compare F-18-FDG PET parameters with clinical, biologic, and sonographic (US) rheumatoid parameters. Methods: Three hundred fifty-six joints were assessed in 21 patients with active RA: the knees in all subjects and either wrists as well as metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints in 13 patients, or ankles and the first metatarsophalangeal joints in the remaining 8 patients. PET analysis consisted of a visual identification of F-18-FDG uptake in the synovium and measurements of standardized uptake values (SUVs). Independent assessors performed the clinical and US examinations. Results: PET positivity was found in 63% of joints, whereas 75%, 79%, and 56% were positive for swelling, tenderness, and US analysis, respectively. Both the rate of PET-positive joints and the SUV increased with the number of positive parameters present (swelling, tenderness, US positivity) and with the synovial thickness. The mean SUV was significantly higher in joints where a power Doppler signal was found. In a global PET analysis, the number of PET-positive joints and the cumulative SUV were significantly correlated with the swollen and tender joint counts, the patient and physician global assessments, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein serum levels, the disease activity score and the simplified disease activity index, the number of US-positive joints, and the cumulative synovial thickness. Conclusion: F-18-FDG PET is a unique imaging technique that can assess the metabolic activity of synovitis and measure the disease activity in RA. [less ▲]

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See detailRheumatoid hand joint synovitis: gray-scale and power Doppler US quantifications following anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment: pilot study
Ribbens, Clio ULg; Andre, Béatrice ULg; Marcelis, Stefaan et al

in Radiology (2003), 229(2), 562-569

PURPOSE: To evaluate by using B-mode and power Doppler ultrasonography (US) and clinical assessment the response of hand joint synovitis in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: To evaluate by using B-mode and power Doppler ultrasonography (US) and clinical assessment the response of hand joint synovitis in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with the anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agent infliximab. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrists, metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints in 11 patients with active RA were assessed before and 6 weeks after three infliximab infusions. US assessment was performed at a single site in the MCP and PIP joints and at two sites (radiocarpal and intercarpal) in the wrists. Twenty measurements were performed in the wrists; 110 measurements, in the MCP joints; and 103 measurements, in the PIP joints. Two wrists and seven PIP joints were excluded owing to complete joint destruction. US parameters (synovial thickness, number of US-positive joints [ie, with synovial thickness > or = 1 mm], cumulative synovial thickness index, and presence of Doppler signal) and clinical parameters (swollen joint count) were independently assessed and compared with baseline values by using the McNemar chi2 and paired Student t tests. RESULTS: After infliximab treatment, there was a significant decrease in the mean numbers of swollen and US-positive joints and in the cumulative synovial thickness (P <.05). The mean synovial thickness decreased in all joints swollen at baseline and in the MCP and PIP joints not swollen at baseline (P <.01). Change from baseline cumulative synovial thickness correlated significantly with change in disease activity score (r = 0.69, P <.05). The number of positive Doppler US signals decreased significantly (in 13 US-positive joints at baseline, in five after treatment; P <.05). CONCLUSION: US is a feasible imaging modality for measurement of the response of RA small-joint synovitis to therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailMaladie de Horton et atteintes arterielles extratemporales: utilite de la tomographie par emission de positons au 18FDG. A propos de trois observations et d'une revue de la litterature
Belhocine, Tarik; Kaye, Olivier; Delanaye, Pierre ULg et al

in Revue de Médecine Interne (2002), 23(7), 584-91

PURPOSE: We report three cases of Horton's disease, in which F18-Fluorine-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated a clinically unsuspected extra-cranial vessels ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: We report three cases of Horton's disease, in which F18-Fluorine-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated a clinically unsuspected extra-cranial vessels hypermetabolism. METHODS: Fully corrected whole-body PET was performed in three patients (two women, one man) for exploring a marked inflammatory syndrome. Scanning was acquired 60 min after i.v. injection of 222 MBq of 18FDG in average. RESULTS: In two patients with histologically proven Horton's disease, PET alone showed increased glucose metabolism involving the carotid and sub-clavian arteries as well as the ascending aorta, aortic arch, thoracic and abdominal aorta, and the iliac and femoral arteries. In the third patient, by detecting cervical, thoracic and abdominal vessel hypermetabolism, PET non-invasively contributed to the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis. All patients had complete clinical and biological response to corticoids. PET controls performed 3- to 6-months post-treatment, confirmed the disappearance of the metabolic stigma. CONCLUSION: 18FDG PET may show an increased glucose metabolism in asymptomatic extracranial vessels locations of Horton's arterities. If these observations are confirmed on controlled trials, PET could be particularly useful for non-invasive diagnosing, staging and monitoring atypical clinical forms of Horton's disease. The metabolic imaging could also contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of GCA. [less ▲]

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See detailFDG-PET imaging for monitoring rheumatoid arthritis treated by infliximab injections.
BECKERS, Catherine ULg; RIBBENS, Clio ULg; ANDRE, Béatrice ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine (The) (2002), 43

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See detailPET for carcinomas of the genitourinary system
Belhocine, Tarik; Hustinx, Roland ULg; Devillers, Céline ULg et al

in Khakhali, I.; Laublant, J.; Goldsmith, S. J. (Eds.) NUCLEAR ONCOLOGY : DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY (2000)

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in ... [more ▼]

This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. This book is intended to provide the state-of-the-art in the present knowledge of the fast growing field of nuclear oncology. The enormous sum of data it gathers is presented by the leading authors in their respective fields. Recent breakthrough as well as validated techniques are explained in details. Among the most stimulating issues, it becomes clear that the long awaited era of radioimmunotherapy is finally coming to reality and is close to enter into routine clinical use. Several chapters are devoted to this future important aspect of our practice. They should allow the reader to become quickly and completely informed about the main results of the recent trials and also to comprehend the expected evolutions in this field. Positron emission tomography (PET) also occupies a large place. Numerous illustrations help the reader to appreciate the wide capabilities of this technique. The more usual radiopharmaceuticals labeled by single photons emitters are not forgotten and all the aspects of the daily practice of nuclear oncology are covered, from thyroid and bone imaging to sentinel lymph node detection. The first part of the book covers transversally the field of nuclear oncology. A radiopharmaceuticals chapter provides an in-depth review of the properties and chemistry of the single-photon and positron emitters radionuclides. The various mechanisms of localization are also described at the membrane level as well as for metabolic substrates. The properties of the agents aiming at hormone receptors and tumor antigens are excellently described, as well as the recently introduced gene expression imaging. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is divided in two parts. The breast cancer chapter retraces the history and background of sestamibi in the detection of MDR. It also describes the methodology and clinical results of the most important scintigraphic studies that have demonstrated the possibility to detect the early development of resistance to chemotherapy. An interesting series of other agents with a high potential in this indication, particularly positron emitters, is discussed. The role of technetium and positron agents for MDR detection in other tumor localisations, especially in the lung, is also well covered. An instrumentation chapter goes through the fundamentals of planar and SPECT imaging, and also presents the new reconstruction and correction algorithms. A large section is occupied by positron imaging. The pros and cons of dedicated detector and camera coincidence are very well detailed. This part should definitely help to decide those who are trying to make a choice between these two options. The general principles of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies imaging and therapy are covered in two very interesting chapters. Then radiotherapy of painful bone metastases compares the capabilities of the various agents available. A large chapter deals with pediatric nuclear oncology, in particular neuroblastoma, bone and central nervous system tumors. Finally, the often forgotten role of nuclear medicine in the detection, and possibly in the prevention, of the cardiotoxicity and nephrotoxicity resulting from cancer therapy are addressed at the end of that first part. The second part of the book goes by organ and begins by addressing brain tumors. A vast chapter is devoted to PET imaging. Besides the tracers and instrumentation issues, patient management occupies a central place, in particular with discussion on the role of nuclear medicine in tissue characterization, treatment planning and assessment of treatment response. Cerebrospinal fluid and shunt imaging are described, with particular attention paid to ventriculoperitoneal shunts. After PET imaging of head and neck carcinoma, a chapter extensively reviews thyroid carcinoma. Iodine therapy and long-term monitoring are covered with great details and useful practical recommendations are provided. Emerging radioimmunotherapy is discussed apart. Parathyroid scintigraphy also occupies a large and well documented chapter. PET imaging of lung carcinoma is particularly well illustrated by several cases. The potential of peptide scintigraphy is presented. Breast cancer occupies five chapters, namely, scintimammography, PET imaging, lymphatic mapping, monoclonal antibody imaging and radionuclide therapy. This provides an extensive review of the present and potential possibilities of nuclear medicine in one of the most frequent tumors. Then the role of PET imaging and the capabilities of radioimmunotherapy for maligancies of the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts are presented, in particular in two chapters entirely dedicated to prostate carcinoma and in two others to ovarian carcinoma. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogues and their value in the diagnosis and treatment of the neuroendocrine tumors are reviewed. Hepatic neoplasia are addressed through the utilization of technetium-labeled galactosyl neoglycoalbumin and hepatic artery infusion. For lymphomas, besides gallium and PET imaging, a very complete chapter is devoted to monoclonal antibody therapy. The extremely promising results obtained with several radiolabeled-anti-CD monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas are reviewed in depth. Additional chapters cover adrenal tumors, melanoma, musculoskeletal tumors, in particular imaging of bone metastases. This comprehensive, didactic, up-to-date, well illustrated review of nuclear oncology should help nuclear medicine physicians as well as oncologists to optimize their practice. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression de l'antigene DRC1 par les cellules leucemiques.
Antoine, Nadine ULg; Beckers, Catherine ULg; Marcoty, C. et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1992), 47(2), 95-9

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (9 ULg)