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See detailEvidence for an own-age bias in age estimation from voices in older persons
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in European Journal of Ageing (2014)

Previous studies have investigated the effect of ageing on age estimation from faces as well as the occur- rence of an own-age bias in such age estimation from faces. To the best of our knowledge, the ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have investigated the effect of ageing on age estimation from faces as well as the occur- rence of an own-age bias in such age estimation from faces. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of an own age effect on age estimation from voices has never been examined earlier using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs. old) and the age of voice stimuli (young vs. old) were crossed. Results revealed an own-age bias in older adults only. In comparison with younger adults, older participants showed age estimation abilities that are preserved for voices from their own age group and impaired for younger voices. This own age bias was absent in younger participants. [less ▲]

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See detailA study about the effects of affective valence on a source-monitoring error: cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, August)

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See detailInfluence of emotional content of items on cryptomnesia
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012 ... [more ▼]

Although the link between emotion and memory has been demonstrated for long, only one study has examined the impact of emotion on inadvertent plagiarism (cryptomnesia) up to now (Gingerich & Dodson, 2012). The Gingerich and Dodson‘s experiment examined the impact of mood on unintentional plagiarism. The present study examined the effect of emotional content of items on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism using the Brown and Murphy paradigm (1989). In a first stage, same-sex dyads (96 participants, 48 men, mean age=21.5 years) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category. Three categories were proposed to our participants: positive, neutral and negative. Participants returned after a one week-delay and were instructed (1) to recall the items generated by themselves one week earlier (RO task), (2) to generate four new items for each category (GN task), and (3) to assign a confidence rating. In the RO task, almost 17% of responses were plagiarisms and the percentage almost reached 9% in the GN task. In the RO task, plagiarism was significantly higher for positive than neutral items. In addition, positive and negative items were better recalled than neutral one. These results demonstrate an impact of the emotional content on inadvertent plagiarism. [less ▲]

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See detailDo we plagiarize more often when the content of the to-be-remembered material is emotional?
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Perfect, Timothy J. et al

Poster (2013, June)

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96 ... [more ▼]

This study examined the impact of the emotional content on rates of cryptomnesia using the Brown and Murphy (1989) paradigm. In a first stage, dyads of young (mean age = 21.5 years) participants (n = 96, 48 females) were asked to generate alternately words corresponding to an emotional category (i.e.,“positive”, “negative” or “neutral”). One week later, participants were instructed (1) to recall the items that were generated by themselves and not by the other member of the dyad (Recall-Own task), (2) to generate four news items (Generate-New task) for each category and (3) to assign confidence ratings to their responses. About 17% of responses were plagiarisms in the recall-own task and the percentage almost reached 9% in the Generate-New task. No significant effects of valence were found on rates of plagiarism in Generate-New task nor on the confidence ratings assigned to the participants' responses. However, cryptomnesia was significantly higher for positive than neutral items while it did not differ significantly across negative and neutral items. Confidence ratings were lower for plagiarized responses than for correct responses but these ratings were higher for plagiarized items than for intrusions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe own-age bias in age estimation of voices
Beaufort, Aline ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, May)

Recently, it has been evidenced that age estimation performance may be influenced by an own-age bias, i.e. we can estimate more accurately the age of one’s own-age people than the age of other age people ... [more ▼]

Recently, it has been evidenced that age estimation performance may be influenced by an own-age bias, i.e. we can estimate more accurately the age of one’s own-age people than the age of other age people (George & Hole, 1995). To the best of our knowledge, all the studies that investigated the own-age bias used faces as stimuli. However, there are situations in which the voice is the only information available in order to estimate a person’s age (Cerrato et al., 2000). In the present study, the occurrence of an own-age bias in age estimation from voices was assessed by using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs old people) and the age of face stimuli (young vs old people) are crossed. Although we did not observe a crossed interaction where each age group would have been more accurate for in-group estimation than for out-group estimation, present results revealed the occurrence of an own-age bias in age estimation in younger adults only. Indeed young participants made smaller absolute errors than older participants when estimating the age of young voices. However, there was no significant difference between age groups when the age of older voices was estimated. [less ▲]

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See detailDo you sound or look as old as you are? A study of age estimation in young and older adults
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Beaufort, Aline ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Perception (2012), 41(supplement), 117

Studies on age estimation usually indicated that people are fairly accurate at estimating the age of a person from her/his face or from her/his voice (with an absolute difference of five and ten years ... [more ▼]

Studies on age estimation usually indicated that people are fairly accurate at estimating the age of a person from her/his face or from her/his voice (with an absolute difference of five and ten years respectively) [e.g. Amilon et al., 2000, in: Speaker Classification II. Lectures Notes in Artificial Intelligence, C Müller, Berlin, Springer-Verlag]. However studies showed also that performance depends on the age of participants and the age of stimuli [Rhodes, 2009, Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23, 1-12; Braun, 1996, Forensic Linguistics, 3, 65-73]. The aim of the present study is to compare age estimation performance from faces and voices by using an experimental design in which the age of participants (young vs older), the age of stimuli (young vs older) and the stimulus domain (face vs voice) were crossed. Overall, the age of faces was more accurately estimated than the age of voices. Moreover performance of age estimation was better for young stimuli than for older stimuli. Finally, young participants made smaller absolute errors than older participants. However there is no difference between young and older participants when estimating the age of older stimuli. [less ▲]

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