References of "Bastin, Christine"
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See detailDisrupted interaction between self and memory in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Conference (2016, July)

In humans, self and memory processes interact as evidenced by the self reference (SRE) and self reference recollection effects (SRRE). However, in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), this relationship ... [more ▼]

In humans, self and memory processes interact as evidenced by the self reference (SRE) and self reference recollection effects (SRRE). However, in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), this relationship can be disrupted. This was evidenced by impaired SRE and SRRE in AD for recognition of adjectives previously judged for self-relevance, as well as recall of names of people previously linked to the self. For both materials, a qualitative impairment of the recollective experience for the self-related items was also observed in AD. A neuroimaging approach suggested that reduced SRE is related to decreased grey matter volume in the lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC). Thus, retrieval of recent self-related memories is impaired in relation to altered high-order processes in lPFC in AD. [less ▲]

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See detailEpisodic memory and aging: The effect of perceptual processing fluency on recognition memory processes
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2016, April 03)

Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences in memory ... [more ▼]

Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences in memory. The study tested two hypotheses: (1) can the reliance on familiarity during recognition memory be promoted by increasing the difference in perceptual processing fluency between old and new items; (2) can this manipulation reduce age-related difficulties in episodic memory? Twenty-four young and 24 older adults performed two verbal recognition memory tasks. In the No-Overlap task, target words and new words did not share any letter. Prior exposition to the target words thus induced increased processing fluency of the words and letters, so that fluency difference was a salient and reliable cue to discriminate between old and new words. In the Overlap task, target and new words had letters in common, so fluency cues were less useful. Recollection and familiarity was assessed with the Remember/Know/Guess paradigm. The results showed an age effect on recollection but intact familiarity. Moreover, (1) memory performance was better in the No Overlap than the Overlap task, with a greater hit rate and a smaller false alarm rate associated with familiarity. And, (2) age-related differences in recognition accuracy (hits – false alarms) were significantly attenuated in the No Overlap task compared to the Overlap task. These findings suggest that minimizing the perceptual similarity between targets and distractors, and thus increasing processing fluency differences, allowed to reduce the effect of age on recognition memory performance by facilitating the use of familiarity. [less ▲]

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See detailRecollection versus familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment: Impact of test format
Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Simon, Jessica ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2016, March 18)

Objectives. Memory retrieval typically involves a combination of recollection and familiarity. However, test format can promote one or the other process (Norman & O’Reilly, 2003). The aim of this study ... [more ▼]

Objectives. Memory retrieval typically involves a combination of recollection and familiarity. However, test format can promote one or the other process (Norman & O’Reilly, 2003). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of test format on recollection and familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods. Seventy young participants (18-30 years), 65 “younger-old” (55- 69 years), 53 “older-old” (70-85 years), and 13 MCIs (55-82 years) were enrolled. In the “forced-choice” task, they had to recognize which picture, among three, was presented during the encoding stage. In the “yes/no” task, they had to judge whether each item, successively presented, was previously seen or not. In each task, they had to give a “Remember/Know/Guess” judgment. Results. Group × Format repeated measures ANOVAs revealed that young people had better recognition performance (d’) than “younger-old”, which were better than “older-old” and MCIs. Moreover, young people used familiarity more accurately than both groups of old participants and MCIs, with MCIs being equivalent to “younger-old” and “older-old”. However, MCIs displayed a high rate of familiarity-based false alarms. The resort to recollection decreased with age and in MCIs. Finally, Group × Format interaction revealed that young people (but not the other groups) could use recollection more often in the “forcedchoice” task compared to the “yes/no” task. Conclusions. Recollection and familiarity decline progressively in healthy aging. In MCI, recollection is more affected than familiarity, but patients demonstrated a more liberal use of familiarity. Finally, test format did not influence strongly the results. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhancing the salience of perceptual fluency improves familiarity-based recognition memory in aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objective. Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences ... [more ▼]

Objective. Normal aging is characterized by decreased recollection, but better preserved familiarity. Memory tasks that facilitate the use of familiarity should allow attenuating age-related differences in memory. The study tested two hypotheses: (1) can the reliance on familiarity during recognition memory be promoted by increasing the difference in perceptual processing fluency between old and new items; (2) can this manipulation reduce age-related difficulties in episodic memory? Methods. Twenty-four young and 24 older adults performed two verbal recognition memory tasks. In the No-Overlap task, target words and new words did not share any letter. Prior exposition to the target words thus induced increased processing fluency of the words and letters, so that fluency difference was a salient and reliable cue to discriminate between old and new words. In the Overlap task, target and new words had letters in common, so fluency cues were less useful. Recollection and familiarity was assessed with the Remember/Know/Guess paradigm. Results. There was an age effect on recollection but intact familiarity. Moreover, (1) memory performance was better in the No Overlap than the Overlap task, with a greater hit rate and a smaller false alarm rate associated with familiarity. (2) Age-related differences in recognition accuracy (hits – false alarms) were significantly attenuated in the No Overlap task compared to the Overlap task. Conclusion. These findings suggest that minimizing the perceptual similarity between targets and distractors, and thus increasing processing fluency differences, allowed to reduce the effect of age on recognition memory performance by facilitating the use of familiarity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of cognitive reserve on recognition memory performance is dependent of the task format in healthy aging
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2016, March 17)

Objective: According to the cognitive reserve hypothesis (Stern, 2009), individuals who have developed a high level of reserve should resist better to the effects of aging than individuals with lower ... [more ▼]

Objective: According to the cognitive reserve hypothesis (Stern, 2009), individuals who have developed a high level of reserve should resist better to the effects of aging than individuals with lower cognitive reserve. In this study, we identified the factors of cognitive reserve that impact most memory performance in aging. Methods: 118 healthy older participants performed one yes/no recognition task and one 3-alternative forced-choice recognition task. For each recognized item, participants provided a Remember/Know/Guess judgment. Furthermore, participants completed a questionnaire assessing different aspects of cognitive reserve (level of education, occupation, physical, social, cultural and intellectual activities). We determined the moderators of cognitive reserve that explain a significant proportion of variance for each memory index through stepwise regression analyzes (p<0.05). Results: In the forced-choice test, the level of education explained positively the use of recollection and negatively the level of false alarms associated with familiarity. In the yes/no recognition task, the precision of recognition was explained positively by the physical activities. Recollection was positively explained by the physical activities and the level of education. Finally, the level of false alarms associated with familiarity was explained negatively by the level of education although the precision of the use of the familiarity is explained positively by physical activities. Conclusion: The more older adults were educated and/or were practicing physical activities, the better their recollection was. The impact of the moderators of the cognitive reserve is dependent on the format of the recognition task. [less ▲]

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See detailEpisodic memory and aging: The effect of perceptual processing fluency on recognition memory processes
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2016), S2016

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See detailThe effect of aging on associative memory for semantically-related word pairs
Folville, Adrien; Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2016)

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See detailSemantic relatedness of the memoranda prevents older adults from benefitting from unitization
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Tibon, Roni; Gronau, Nurit et al

Poster (2016)

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See detailImpact du format du test sur la recollection et la familiarité dans le vieillissement normal et le trouble cognitif léger de type amnésique
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Conference (2015, December 04)

Les tâches de reconnaissance à choix-forcé et oui/non ont largement été utilisées dans l’évaluation de la mémoire. Selon Norman et O’Reilly (2003), le format oui/non ferait davantage intervenir la ... [more ▼]

Les tâches de reconnaissance à choix-forcé et oui/non ont largement été utilisées dans l’évaluation de la mémoire. Selon Norman et O’Reilly (2003), le format oui/non ferait davantage intervenir la recollection alors que le format à choix-forcé favoriserait la comparaison du sentiment de familiarité associé à chaque item et la sélection du plus familier. L’objectif de cette étude est d’explorer l’impact du format du test sur la recollection et la familiarité au travers du vieillissement normal et pathologique. Septante participants jeunes (18 - 30 ans), 65 participants jeunes-âgés (55 - 69 ans), 53 participants âgés-âgés (70-85 ans) et 13 patients présentant un trouble cognitif léger amnésique (55-82 ans) ont réalisé deux tâches de reconnaissance. Pour chaque tâche, lors de l’encodage, nous avons présenté, à deux reprises, 25 images à mémoriser. Dans la tâche de reconnaissance à choix forcé, les participants devaient reconnaitre parmi trois images très semblables celle qui a été vue précédemment. Dans la tâche de reconnaissance oui/non, les items étaient présentés successivement et les participants devaient reconnaitre ceux présentés à l’encodage. Pour chaque item reconnu, les participants devaient fournir un jugement Remember/Know/Guess. Les ANOVA Groupe x Format à mesures répétées sur la dernière variable (p<0,05) ont révélé que les jeunes avaient de meilleures performances en reconnaissance (score d’) que les jeunes-âgés, qui ont eux-mêmes de meilleures performances que les âgés-âgés et les patients. En outre, les jeunes utilisent plus souvent le sentiment de familiarité pour reconnaître les images étudiées que les participants âgés et les patients. De plus, les participants jeunes-âgés utilisent plus souvent la familiarité que les participants âgés-âgés, alors qu’il n’y a pas de différence entre ceux-ci et les patients. Cependant, les fausses alarmes associées à la familiarité augmentent progressivement dans le vieillissement et la pathologie. L’utilisation de la recollection est progressivement réduite avec l’âge et altérée dans la pathologie. Enfin, les jeunes tendent à utiliser plus souvent la recollection dans la tâche à choix-forcé (p=0,055), alors qu’il n’y a pas de différence pour les autres groupes. Tous ces résultats suggèrent que le vieillissement normal s’accompagne d’un déclin progressif de la recollection et de la familiarité. Dans le vieillissement pathologique, on observe des performances similaires au groupe le plus âgé en reconnaissance malgré un déficit de recollection. Les patients utilisent la familiarité autant que les deux groupes âgés bien que les taux de fausses alarmes soient plus importants, suggérant une utilisation privilégiée mais inadéquate de ce processus. [less ▲]

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See detailLa détection précoce de la maladie d'Alzheimer
Bastin, Christine ULg

Conference (2015, November 17)

Lorsque le diagnostic de maladie d’Alzheimer est posé, les atteintes au niveau du cerveau et l’ampleur des difficultés dans la vie quotidienne ont atteint un seuil critique. Actuellement, les chercheurs ... [more ▼]

Lorsque le diagnostic de maladie d’Alzheimer est posé, les atteintes au niveau du cerveau et l’ampleur des difficultés dans la vie quotidienne ont atteint un seuil critique. Actuellement, les chercheurs et les cliniciens pensent que pour tenter de retarder l’apparition d’une démence, voire même l’empêcher, il faut agir bien avant que les premiers symptômes majeurs apparaissent. Le défi actuel est de trouver les meilleurs outils permettant de détecter le plus tôt possible les premiers signes de la maladie. Etant donné que des changements cognitifs peuvent être détectés très tôt, les neuropsychologues tentent d’identifier parmi les tests qui forment le bilan neuropsychologique ceux qui permettent de prédire au mieux le développement futur d’une maladie d’Alzheimer. Les recherches ont suggéré que les mesures ayant le meilleur pouvoir de prédiction semblent être celles de mémoire épisodique (qui est la capacité à se souvenir d’événements vécus dans un contexte bien précis) et les mesures de fluence verbale (qui est la capacité à citer un grand nombre de mots appartenant à une catégorie ou commençant par une lettre donnée). Le groupe Vieillissement et Mémoire, au sein du Centre de Recherches du Cyclotron (Université de Liège), poursuit actuellement deux lignes de recherche en lien avec la question de la détection précoce de la maladie d’Alzheimer : Premièrement, nous tentons de déterminer si nous pouvons encore mieux détecter les personnes à risque de développer une maladie d’Alzheimer en affinant les mesures de la mémoire. Le point de départ de cette recherche doit être une compréhension approfondie des mécanismes qui régissent le fonctionnement de la mémoire ainsi que de leurs bases cérébrales. Nos premiers résultats ont montré une perte précoce de la capacité à réactiver tous les détails d’un épisode vécu, associée à une déconnexion entre les régions d’un réseau cérébral incluant le cortex cingulaire postérieur et l’hippocampe. Deuxièmement, nous étudions les facteurs protecteurs qui permettent à certaines personnes de mieux résister que d’autres aux effets négatifs du vieillissement et de la pathologie cérébrale. Une étude non encore publiée menée auprès de personnes âgées sans trouble cognitif a montré que plus les personnes avaient étudié longtemps et avaient pratiqué une activité physique au cours de leur vie, meilleure était leur capacité à se souvenir des détails des événements vécus. Enfin, une approche idéale pour Identifier le plus tôt possible qui risque de développer des symptômes de déclin cognitif est l’approche multidisciplinaire. Plutôt que d’évaluer l’intérêt d’une mesure seule, nous proposons de tenir compte de manière combinée des différents éléments qui semblent contribuer à la détection précoce de la maladie d’Alzheimer : modifications neuropathologiques, mesures neuropsychologiques, mesures de la structure et du fonctionnement cérébral, habitudes de vie, changements physiologiques et modification du sommeil. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailMesures de mémoire épisodique
Bastin, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2015, June 09)

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See detailThe effect of ageing and encoding instructions on episodic memory
Hagelstein, Catherine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Manard, Marine ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on ... [more ▼]

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on the performance of younger and older adults during an episodic memory task. Twenty young volunteers (aged 18 to 30 years old) and 20 older volunteers (aged 61 to 72 years old) participated in this experiment. The stimuli consisted of 300 black-and-white drawings of common objects. The task comprised two steps. During the encoding phase, 100 items were presented once ("hard" condition) and 100 other items were presented twice ("easy" condition). During recognition, the items from the encoding phase were presented again, as well as 100 new items. In each age group, half of the participants received incidental encoding instructions (they had to make size judgements about the objects depicted) while the other half were explicitly asked to memorize the objects presented because they would be asked to recognize them later on (intentional encoding). During recognition, they performed a Remember-Know judgement for the items they believed they had seen earlier. We carried out ANOVAs in order to test for the influence of instructions, age group and number of repetitions of the items in one hand on the percentage of recollection and on the other hand on the percentage of familiarity (p<.05). Results show a significant effect of age, with more correct recollection responses in young adults, whereas more correct familiarity was found in older adults. Furthermore, it was found that the items presented twice lead to more recollection than those presented only once. Finally, these results also suggest that in the older group of participants, only for the items presented twice, intentional encoding instructions lead to more recollection and less familiarity. This finding is consistent with previous work showing that the elderly do not easily use elaborate encoding strategies, and that they need more support (here, a second exposition to the material) in order to perform a deep encoding when they are encouraged to do so with intentional learning instructions (b). (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Froger, C., Bouazzaoui, B., Isingrini, M., & Taconnat, L. (2012). Study time allocation deficit of older adults: the role of environmental support at encoding? Psychology and Aging, 27(3), 577-588. doi:10.1037/a0026358 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (7 ULg)