References of "Bastin, Christine"
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See detailSelf in Dementia
Antoine, Nicolas ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Mishara; Corlett, P.; Fletcher, P. (Eds.) et al Phenomenological Neuropsychiatry, How Patient Experience Bridges Clinic with Clinical Neuroscience (in press)

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See detailRecollection versus familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment: Impact of test format
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2017, March 24)

If familiarity is better preserved than recollection in aging and in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (Koen & Yonelinas, 2014), the experimental conditions promoting its use should be beneficial to ... [more ▼]

If familiarity is better preserved than recollection in aging and in the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (Koen & Yonelinas, 2014), the experimental conditions promoting its use should be beneficial to these populations. One condition influencing the relative contribution of recollection and familiarity during recognition is the format of the test. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of test format on recollection and familiarity in normal aging and in MCI in two tasks where the level of performance is equalized. Seventy young participants, 70 younger-old (55-69 years old), 69 older-old (70-85 years old), and 13 MCIs were presented with forced-choice and yes/no visual recognition memory tasks with the Remember/Know/ Guess paradigm. Young participants had better recognition memory performance than younger-old, who performed better than older-old and MCIs. Recollection and familiarity declined progressively in healthy aging. In MCI, recollection was more affected than familiarity, but patients demonstrated a more liberal use of familiarity. Finally, test format did not influence strongly the results. Young people used recollection more often in the forced-choice task compared to the yes/no task. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the number of alternatives during a forced-choice recognition task on recollection and familiarity in normal aging
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2017, March 23)

Forced-choice recognition tasks are often used to evaluate recognition memory. However, no study have specifically investigate the impact of the number of alternatives on memory performance. Here, we ... [more ▼]

Forced-choice recognition tasks are often used to evaluate recognition memory. However, no study have specifically investigate the impact of the number of alternatives on memory performance. Here, we wanted to determine, on the one hand, if the number of alternatives - two or three - and on the other hand if the degree of similarity between targets and foils have an impact on recognition strategies. Moreover, we investigated how aging interacted with these variables. We recruited 20 young and 20 older participants. During the reconnaissance task, they had to choose, among two or three photographs of faces, the one that was presented previously. Some couples of targets and foils were more similar than others (sharing 60% of common characteristics versus 40%). For each selected item, the participants had to explain what guided their choice via verbal reports. We observed similar performance between the groups for the two-alternative recognition memory task, while young participants had better performance than the older participants in the three-alternative task. Young participants used more often recollection when the similarity between targets and foils was higher, unlike older participants whose rate of recollection was not influenced by target-foil similarity. Both groups used more often familiarity in the two-alternative task, but older participants demonstrated a more liberal bias. Finally, our participants used more often elimination strategies when the similarity is low or when they had to select one item out of three. [less ▲]

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See detailRelating pessimistic memory predictions to Alzheimer’s disease brain structure
Genon, Sarah ULg; Simon, Jessica ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2017, March 23)

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) show impairment of episodic memory and related metacognitive processes. The present study examined subjective metacognitive judgments preceding objective memory ... [more ▼]

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) show impairment of episodic memory and related metacognitive processes. The present study examined subjective metacognitive judgments preceding objective memory retrieval and investigated the neural correlates of pessimistic predictions for successfully retrieved memories in AD patients. AD patients and healthy older participants provided predictive judgements on their recognition performance before retrieval of famous (semantic) and recently learned (episodic) names. Correlations between grey matter volume (GMV) in T1 images and behavioural scores were examined with multivariate (PLS) and univariate (GLM) analyses in AD patients. AD patients showed a significant proportion of successful name recognition preceded by pessimistic prediction (Prediction_low_hits) in episodic memory. PLS revealed that behavioural pattern in AD patients was related with a mainly right lateralized pattern of GMV decrease including medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate cortex, but also right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). GLM further confirmed that pessimistic prediction negatively correlated with GMV in VLPFC. Thus, impaired monitoring processes (possibly influenced by inaccurate beliefs) allowing inferences about one’s own memory performance are primarily related to decrease GMV in VLPFC in AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailRecognition memory is associated with hippocampal volume in aging population: new evidence from brain imaging study
Narbutas, Justinas ULg; Blanpain, Manon ULg; Van Egroo, Maxime ULg et al

Poster (2017, March 23)

Introduction. The hippocampus is crucial for episodic memory, especially for recollection and pattern separation (i.e., the ability to store similar episodes as distinct memory traces). Episodic memory ... [more ▼]

Introduction. The hippocampus is crucial for episodic memory, especially for recollection and pattern separation (i.e., the ability to store similar episodes as distinct memory traces). Episodic memory declines with aging and this has been associated with hippocampal dysfunction. The main objective of our study was to explore how performance on a recognition memory task designed to assess pattern separation is associated with hippocampal volume in aging population. Methods. Fourteen healthy late middle-aged participants (52-69 years-old) were evaluated on a Mnemonic Similarity Task (MST). In this task, participants study pictures and then have to discriminate between targets, similar lures, and unrelated foil objects. Recognition memory (RM) is assessed as the difference between hits and false alarms to unrelated foils, while pattern separation Bias metric (BPS) is the difference between the rate of ‘‘Similar’’ responses given to the lure items minus ‘‘Similar’’ responses given to the foils. Hippocampal volume was calculated using ASHS software, which uses T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI to obtain optimal segmentation of hippocampal subfields. Results. Correlation analysis of preliminary data revealed that RM was significantly positively associated with the volume of the left subiculum and left perirhinal area 35, while there were no significant correlations in the right hemisphere. BPS was positively correlated with the volume of right CA2 region, but negatively associated with the volume of right CA3 region, what is more contradictory according to the current literature. No significant link was found between BPS and the volume of hippocampal subfields in the left hemisphere. Conclusion. In a middle-aged population, better visual recognition memory is associated with larger volume of the left subiculum and perirhinal area 35, two regions supporting representation of objects [less ▲]

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See detailAging and Recollection: a context story
Folville, Adrien ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg

Poster (2017, March)

Although aging is related to decline in recollection as measured by so-called objective measures, older adults’ subjective experience of recollection remains sometimes stable. Such dissociation could ... [more ▼]

Although aging is related to decline in recollection as measured by so-called objective measures, older adults’ subjective experience of recollection remains sometimes stable. Such dissociation could suggest that younger and older adults use details with different diagnosticity to make subjective recollection judgments. However, the type of details that are reported as bases for recollective experiences by younger adults can also vary as a function of context. Here, we directly investigated age-related changes in recollection and familiarity in different memorability context. Participants studied one set of words in a medium level of processing (LOP) task, and another set of words with either a shallow or deep LOP task (i.e., low vs. high memorability context, respectively). At test, participants discriminated between old and new words and provided information about the basis of their recollective experiences. In both age groups, medium items received more recollection judgments in low (vs. high) memorability context. These recollections seem to be associated with internal information (thought, image, emotion). In contrast, external details (list source, appearance, list position) more often accompanied recollection of medium items in high (vs. low) memorability context. We discuss this effect in terms of Gruppuso et al.’s (1997) functional account. Like younger adults, what older adults deem to be an experience of remembering arises from the functional utility of the recollected information for accomplishing the task. In the low (vs. high) memorability context, the information recollected for medium items more easily met the functional definition of remembering established by participants during the test. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired familiarity in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Commentary on Schoemaker et al. (2016)
Bastin, Christine ULg; Besson, Gabriel ULg

in Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring (2017), 6

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See detailTime course of familiarity and novelty decisions in aging
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Moulin, Christopher et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailRelating pessimistic memory predictions to Alzheimer’s disease brain structure
Genon, Sarah ULg; Simon, Jessica ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2016), 85

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) show impairment of episodic memory and related metacognitive processes. The present study examined subjective metacognitive judgments preceding objective memory ... [more ▼]

Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) show impairment of episodic memory and related metacognitive processes. The present study examined subjective metacognitive judgments preceding objective memory retrieval and investigated the neural correlates of pessimistic predictions for successfully retrieved memories in AD patients. AD patients and healthy older participants provided predictive judgements on their recognition performance before retrieval of famous (semantic) and recently learned (episodic) names. Correlations between grey matter volume (GMV) in T1 images and behavioural scores were examined with multivariate (PLS) and univariate (GLM) analyses in AD patients. AD patients showed a significant proportion of successful name recognition preceded by pessimistic prediction (Prediction_low_hits) in episodic memory. PLS revealed that behavioural pattern in AD patients was related with a mainly right lateralized pattern of GMV decrease including medial temporal lobe and posterior cingulate cortex, but also right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). GLM further confirmed that pessimistic prediction negatively correlated with GMV in VLPFC. Thus, impaired monitoring processes (possibly influenced by inaccurate beliefs) allowing inferences about one’s own memory performance are primarily related to decrease GMV in VLPFC in AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailL’impact des connaissances sémantiques préexistantes en mémoire associative dans le vieillissement normal
Folville, Adrien ULg; Delhaye, Emma ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie, Neurosciences Cognitives et Cliniques (2016), 8(4), 253-260

The formation of a global and complex episodic memory requires memory for single units of information of the target event but also binding these elements together. This binding capacity diminishes in ... [more ▼]

The formation of a global and complex episodic memory requires memory for single units of information of the target event but also binding these elements together. This binding capacity diminishes in healthy aging leading to a so-called associative memory deficit. Interestingly, when support is provided during encoding thanks to semantic prior-knowledge (e.g., semantically related word pairs), this associative deficit can be alleviated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current literature about the influence of prior-knowledge on associative memory performance in healthy aging. Through an analysis of the procedures that have been used in associative memory studies, we suggest two factors that appear to modulate the impact of prior knowledge on older adults’ associative memory. First, the way word pairs are recombined from the encoding to the retrieval phase is the main factor that has to be taken into account. Conditions that promote recall-to-reject discrimination processes lead to similar performance in older compared to younger adults, whereas conditions that require recollection discrimination lead to an age-related decline. Second, the nature of the semantic relations involved in the prior-knowledge support may influence older adults’ performance by modulating the contribution of recollection and familiarity to recognition. Indeed, categorical semantic relations engage both recollection and familiarity-based discrimination, whereas thematic relations allow participants to rely on familiarity-based discrimination only. This latest observation is crucial when one considers recollection as a declining process, in contrast to familiarity, which remains spared in healthy aging. Therefore, future studies should explore the propensity of other semantic relations to alleviate the age-related associative memory decline. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreasing the salience of fluency cues does not reduce the recognition memory impairment in Alzheimer’s disease!
Simon, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Neuropsychology (2016)

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is now well established that recollection is impaired from the beginning of the disease, whereas findings are less clear concerning familiarity. One of the most important ... [more ▼]

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is now well established that recollection is impaired from the beginning of the disease, whereas findings are less clear concerning familiarity. One of the most important mechanisms underlying familiarity is the sense of familiarity driven by processing fluency. In this study, we attempted to attenuate recognition memory deficits in AD by maximizing the salience of fluency cues in two conditions of a recognition memory task. In one condition, targets and foils have been created from the same pool of letters (Overlap condition). In a second condition, targets and foils have been derived from two separate pools of letters (No-Overlap condition), promoting the use of letter-driven visual and phonetic fluency. Targets and foils were low-frequency words. The memory tasks were performed by 15 patients with AD and 16 healthy controls. Both groups improved their memory performance in the No-Overlap condition compared to the Overlap condition. Patients with AD were able to use fluency cues during recognition memory as older adults did, but this did not allow to compensate for dysfunction of recognition memory processes. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact du nombre d’alternatives lors d’une tâche de reconnaissance à choix-forcé sur les processus de reconnaissance dans le vieillissement normal
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

Poster (2016, September 19)

Les tâches de reconnaissance à choix forcé sont classiquement utilisées pour évaluer la mémoire de reconnaissance. Cependant, aucune étude n’a spécifiquement investigué l’impact du nombre d’alternatives ... [more ▼]

Les tâches de reconnaissance à choix forcé sont classiquement utilisées pour évaluer la mémoire de reconnaissance. Cependant, aucune étude n’a spécifiquement investigué l’impact du nombre d’alternatives sur les performances mnésiques des participants âgés. Nous voulons déterminer, d’une part, si le nombre d’alternatives proposées - deux ou trois – et d’autre part, si le degré de similarité entre la cible et ses leurres ont un impact sur les stratégies de récupération mises en place au cours de la tâche. Pour ce faire, nous avons recruté 20 participants jeunes et 20 participants âgés. Lors de la tâche de reconnaissance, nous leur avons demandé de choisir, parmi deux ou trois photographies de visages, celui qui a été présenté précédemment. Certains couples cibles-leurres étaient plus similaires que d’autres (partage de 60% de caractéristiques communes, contre 40%). Pour chaque item sélectionné, les participants devaient expliquer ce qui a guidé leur choix. Les premières analyses (ANOVA à mesures répétées 2 (groupes) x 2 (alternatives) x 2 (similarité) sur les deux dernières mesures, p<0,05) montrent que les performances entre les groupes sont équivalentes pour la tâche de reconnaissance à deux alternatives. A l’inverse, nous avons observé que les participants jeunes avaient significativement de meilleures performances que les âgés dans la tâche de reconnaissance à trois alternatives. Les profils mnésiques des participants seront étudiés à la lumière des modèles à deux processus de la reconnaissance. Nous faisons l’hypothèse d’un recours plus fréquent à la recollection chez les jeunes dans la tâche de reconnaissance à trois alternatives (vs deux alternatives), alors que le choix de l’item se ferait chez les âgés, en comparant directement les degrés de familiarité associés à chaque item et en sélectionnant le plus familier (Norman & O’Reilly, 2003). [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of aging on task- and stimulus-related cerebral attention networks
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2016), 44

Interactions between a dorsal attention (DAN) and a ventral attention cerebral network (VAN) have been reported in young participants during attention or short term memory (STM) tasks. Since it remains an ... [more ▼]

Interactions between a dorsal attention (DAN) and a ventral attention cerebral network (VAN) have been reported in young participants during attention or short term memory (STM) tasks. Since it remains an under-investigated question, age effects on DAN and VAN activity and their functional balance were explored during performance of a STM task. Older and young groups showed similar behavioral patterns of results. At the cerebral level, DAN activation increased as a function of increasing STM load in both groups, suggesting preserved activity in DAN during healthy aging. Age-related over-recruitment in regions of the DAN in the higher task load raised the question of compensation attempt versus less efficient use of neural resources in older adults. Lesser decrease of VAN activation with increasing load and decreased stimulus-driven activation in the VAN, especially in the higher load, in older participants suggested age-related reduced response in the VAN. However, functional connectivity measures showed that VAN was still functionally connected to the DAN in older participants. [less ▲]

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See detailBridging familiarity and novelty detection: a matter of timing?
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Moulin, Christopher et al

Conference (2016, July 21)

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See detailRecollection versus familiarity in normal aging and in mild cognitive impairment: Impact of test format.
Simon, Jessica ULg; Gilsoul, Jessica ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2016, July 18)

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of test format on recollection and familiarity in normal aging and in MCI. Seventy young participants, 65 younger-old, 53 older-old, and 13 MCIs were ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of test format on recollection and familiarity in normal aging and in MCI. Seventy young participants, 65 younger-old, 53 older-old, and 13 MCIs were presented with forced-choice and yes/no visual recognition memory tasks with the Remember/Know/Guess paradigm. The young people had better recognition performance than younger-old, who performed better than older-old and MCIs. Recollection and familiarity declined progressively in healthy aging. In MCI, recollection was more affected than familiarity, but patients demonstrated a more liberal use of familiarity. Finally, test format did not influence strongly the results. Young people used recollection more often in the forced-choice task compared to the yes/no task. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (4 ULg)