References of "Bastin, Christine"
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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (in press)

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailMesures de mémoire épisodique
Bastin, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2015, June 09)

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See detailThe effect of ageing and encoding instructions on episodic memory
Hagelstein, Catherine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Manard, Marine ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on ... [more ▼]

During ageing, a decline in episodic memory is observed, characterized by decreased recollection (a). In this study, we investigated the influence of encoding instructions, intentional or incidental, on the performance of younger and older adults during an episodic memory task. Twenty young volunteers (aged 18 to 30 years old) and 20 older volunteers (aged 61 to 72 years old) participated in this experiment. The stimuli consisted of 300 black-and-white drawings of common objects. The task comprised two steps. During the encoding phase, 100 items were presented once ("hard" condition) and 100 other items were presented twice ("easy" condition). During recognition, the items from the encoding phase were presented again, as well as 100 new items. In each age group, half of the participants received incidental encoding instructions (they had to make size judgements about the objects depicted) while the other half were explicitly asked to memorize the objects presented because they would be asked to recognize them later on (intentional encoding). During recognition, they performed a Remember-Know judgement for the items they believed they had seen earlier. We carried out ANOVAs in order to test for the influence of instructions, age group and number of repetitions of the items in one hand on the percentage of recollection and on the other hand on the percentage of familiarity (p<.05). Results show a significant effect of age, with more correct recollection responses in young adults, whereas more correct familiarity was found in older adults. Furthermore, it was found that the items presented twice lead to more recollection than those presented only once. Finally, these results also suggest that in the older group of participants, only for the items presented twice, intentional encoding instructions lead to more recollection and less familiarity. This finding is consistent with previous work showing that the elderly do not easily use elaborate encoding strategies, and that they need more support (here, a second exposition to the material) in order to perform a deep encoding when they are encouraged to do so with intentional learning instructions (b). (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Froger, C., Bouazzaoui, B., Isingrini, M., & Taconnat, L. (2012). Study time allocation deficit of older adults: the role of environmental support at encoding? Psychology and Aging, 27(3), 577-588. doi:10.1037/a0026358 [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 28)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Given that activations in these areas did not correlate with performance, they could be interepreted either as dedifferentiation or as an attempt of the ageing brain to compensate for a less elaborate encoding. However, no increase of activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of ageing on episodic memory encoding: an fMRI study
François, Sarah ULg; Angel, Lucie; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 21)

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear ... [more ▼]

It is now commonly accepted that a decline in episodic memory is observed with ageing: while recollection processes are impaired, familiarity seems to be relatively preserved (a). Older individuals appear to recruit prefrontal areas bilaterally when their encoding is successful, while in young adults this activation is found to be left-lateralized (b). In this study, we were interested in the differences between younger and older participant regarding cerebral activity during encoding depending on whether the item elicited recollection or familiarity during the recognition phase. Twenty young volunteers (aged 19 to 29 years old) and 19 older volunteers (aged 60 to 78 years old) were presented visual stimuli depicting objects. During a first fMRI session, they were asked to make a size judgement about them. Then, in a second phase, the subjects were shown the items previously encountered during the encoding phase, as well as distractors. Participants' task was to determine which one were new and which one were seen earlier. For the latter, they also performed a Remember-Know judgement. Data were analysed using SPM8, with an event design comparing modifications in cerebral activity between the two subjects groups during encoding (1) for the items leading to recollection during the recognition phase compared to those leading to familiarity, and (2) for the items associated with familiarity during the recognition phase compared to those which were not recognized. Results show that older adults display a heightened activity in the right middle frontal gyrus, medial cingulate and paracingulate left gyri as well as in the precuneus, bilaterally when they engage recollection processes. Amongst those regions, the precuneus seems to underlie compensatory processes, allowing the elderly to perform a richer encoding, as it was previously suggested for recollection processes during recall (c). However, no increase in activity was associated with familiarity processes in older adults, possibly because they are less demanding regarding attentional resources. (a) Bugaiska, A., Clarys, D., Jarry, C., Taconnat, L., Tapia, G., Vanneste, S., & Isingrini, M. (2007). The effect of aging in recollective experience: the processing speed and executive functioning hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition, 16(4), 797-808. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2006.11.007 (b) Duverne, S., Motamedinia, S., & Rugg, M. D. (2009). The relationship between aging, performance, and the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Cerebral Cortex, 19(3), 733-744. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhn122 (c) Angel, L., Bastin, C., Genon, S., Balteau, E., Phillips, C., Luxen, A., . . . Collette, F. (2013). Differential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity. Cortex, 49(6), 1585-1597. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2012.10.002 [less ▲]

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See detailEpisodic memory in Alzheimer’s disease: Investigation of recollection and familiarity processes
Bastin, Christine ULg

Scientific conference (2015, March 12)

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, Mathieu; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is ... [more ▼]

SV2A is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of levetiracetam. Levetiracetam is an antiepileptic drug which has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling. The IF was also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The image-derived arterial IFs were showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The [18F]UCB-H PET data showed a high and rapid uptake in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout allowing the standard compartmental modeling (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot). The three models gave similar results with both the measured and image-derived IFs. The total distribution volume of the tracer in the brain was greater than 7 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies. Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. SV2A modifications may consequently be assessed in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence and prognosis of Alzheimer’s disease at the mild cognitive impairment stage
Vos; VERHEY, F.; Frölich, L. et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2015), 138

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (7 ULg)
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See detailRecognition of Personally Familiar Faces and Functional Connectivity in Alzheimer’s Disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2015), 67

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See detailImpairment of age estimation from faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease [=JAD] (2015), 45

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See detailThe neural basis of temporal order processing in past and future thought
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Jeunehomme, Olivier ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2015), 27

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (19 ULg)