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See detailDoes drawing faces make you a super-expert of faces? An investigation of face perception and recognition abilities in visual artists.
Devue, Christel ULg; Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2012, September 01)

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing ... [more ▼]

Face recognition abilities might constitute a continuum with developmental prosopagnosia and outstanding face recognition capacity at each extreme. 'Super-recognizers' display better face processing abilities than controls and show a larger face inversion effect (FIE) [Russell et al, 2009, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16 (2), 252-257]. Hence, FIE could reflect a specific visual experience/expertise with faces compared to other objects rather than a qualitatively different kind of processing. In this experiment we tested face processing abilities of visual artists who practice portraiture, as well as more general visual perception and recognition skills, in order to contribute to the long-lasting debate about a possible special status of faces. If some special processing faces benefit from is due to expertise, artists' practice might lead to better perceptual and possibly recognition performance with upright faces compared to controls, while increasing the FIE. Because they need to take both configural and featural information into account to reach a satisfactory likeness, artists might also make a differential use of these facial cues compared to controls. Preliminary data indicate that face processing performance might indeed be linked to perceptual expertise with faces. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of distinctiveness in person recognition from faces and voices
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Conference (2012, August 30)

Objectives: When we recognize a familiar person, we can retrieve different kinds of information about her/him: semantic information (e.g. the person’s occupation), episodic information, such as a memory ... [more ▼]

Objectives: When we recognize a familiar person, we can retrieve different kinds of information about her/him: semantic information (e.g. the person’s occupation), episodic information, such as a memory of a specific occasion on which this person has previously been encountered and lexical information (i.e. the name). Recent findings indicated that semantic and episodic information retrieval is more likely to be elicited following familiar face than voice recognition. The present study was designed in order to explore the potential role of stimulus distinctiveness as an underlying factor of the face advantage. Design: The design included two within-subject factors: the stimulus domain (faces or voices) and the stimulus distinctiveness (distinctive or typical). Methods: The proportions of episodic and semantic information recalled following the recognition of famous faces and voices was assessed, using an adapted version of the Remember/Know paradigm. Results: In line with earlier results, more semantic and episodic information was retrieved from faces than voices. Moreover, semantic information was better retrieved from distinctive than typical stimuli. Nonetheless, distinctiveness impacted less than domain on the recall of semantic information, since more semantic details were retrieved from typical faces than from distinctive voices. Conclusions: These results are discussed in the light of current models of person recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailAccess to semantic and episodic information from faces and voices: Does distinctiveness matter?
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2012), 24(7), 789-795

This study was aimed at investigating the role of stimulus distinctiveness on the retrieval of semantic and episodic information from familiar faces and voices. Distinctiveness of famous faces and voices ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating the role of stimulus distinctiveness on the retrieval of semantic and episodic information from familiar faces and voices. Distinctiveness of famous faces and voices was manipulated in order to assess its role as a potential underlying factor of face superiority. In line with previous findings, more semantic and episodic information was retrieved from faces than from voices. Semantic information was better retrieved from distinctive than from typical stimuli. Nevertheless, distinctiveness seemed to impact less than stimulus domain on the recall of semantic details. Indeed, more semantic information was retrieved from typical faces than from distinctive voices. The consistency of these results with current models of person recognition is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRecalling semantic and episodic information for faces and voices: A face advantage
Brédart, Serge ULg; Barsics, Catherine ULg

in Current Directions in Psychological Science (2012), 21(6), 378-381

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See detailRecalling semantic information about newly learned faces and voices
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Memory (2012), 20(5), 527-534

Several findings showed that semantic information is more likely to be retrieved from recognised faces than from recognised voices. Earlier experiments, which investigated the recall of biographical ... [more ▼]

Several findings showed that semantic information is more likely to be retrieved from recognised faces than from recognised voices. Earlier experiments, which investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition, used stimuli that were pre-experimentally familiar to the participants, such as famous people’s voices and faces. We propose an alternative method to compare the participants’ ability to associate semantic information with faces and voices. The present experiments allowed a very strict control of frequency of exposure to pre-experimentally unfamiliar faces and voices and ensured the absence of identity clues in the spoken extracts. In Experiment 1 semantic information was retrieved from the presentation of a name. In Experiment 2 semantic and lexical information was retrieved from faces and/or voices. A memory advantage for faces over voices was again observed. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrieving semantic information from faces and voices
Barsics, Catherine ULg

in In L. Carlson, C. Hoelscher, & T.F. Shipley (Eds.), Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (2011)

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See detailRetrieving semantic information from persons’ names.
Barsics, Catherine ULg

Poster (2011)

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See detailRecalling episodic information about personally known faces and voices
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2011), 20(2), 303-308

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See detailPerson recognition: Effects of face and voice learning on access to semantic information from names.
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Marloye, Zoé

Conference (2010, May 28)

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical ... [more ▼]

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used stimuli that were pre-experimentally familiar to the participants, such as famous people’s voices and faces. The present study was designed in order to allow a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces). In the present study, subjects had to associate lexical (i.e., name) and semantic information (i.e., occupation) with faces or voices. When asked later to recall semantic information being cued by the person’s names, participants provided significantly more occupations for the targets that had been previously associated with faces than with voices. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. Finally, the potential role of the relative distinctiveness of voices and faces is also considered. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of face and voice learning on access to semantic information from names.
Barsics, Catherine ULg

in Perception (2010), 39 supplement

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical ... [more ▼]

Several studies showed that it is more difficult to retrieve semantic information from recognized voices than from recognized faces. However, earlier studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used stimuli that were pre-experimentally familiar to the participants, such as famous people’s voices and faces. The present study was designed in order to allow a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces) and to ensure the absence of identity cues in the spoken extracts. In the present study, subjects had to associate lexical (i.e., name) and semantic information (i.e., occupation) with faces or voices. Interestingly, when asked later to recall semantic information being cued by the person’s names, participants provided significantly more occupations for the targets that had been previously associated with faces than with voices. Moreover, participants’ performance was not significantly different when names and occupation were associated with voices compared with dog’s faces, whose complexity is similar to that of human faces, but for which we have poorer discrimination abilities. These results and their implications for person recognition models, as well as the potential role of the relative distinctiveness of faces and voices, are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFamiliar person recognition: Is autonoetic consciousness more likely to accompany face recognition than voice recognition?
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Dubois, Daniel (Ed.) COMPUTING ANTICIPATORY SYSTEMS, CASYS'09 - Ninth International Conference, Liège, Belgium, 3-8 August 2009 (2009, August 05)

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See detailRetrieving episodic memories when recognizing familiar faces and names.
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

in Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Austin, TX: Cognitive Science Society. (2009)

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember/Know paradigm the proportions of episodic memories recalled following the recognition of famous faces and names (Conditions) were assessed. Presented faces and names were previously judged by an independent group of participants as eliciting an equivalent level of familiarity. Nevertheless significant differences between the two conditions appeared in hit and false alarm rates. However, present results showed no significant difference in the recollection of personal memories (Remember responses conditionalized on the hits), following familiar faces compared with familiar names recognition. This finding contrasts with recent accounts assuming that faces are more prone to yield episodic memories than other cues to person identity. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailRecalling semantic information about personally known faces and voices
Brédart, Serge ULg; Barsics, Catherine ULg; Hanley, Rick

in European Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2009), 21(7), 1013-1021

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See detailFamiliar person recognition: do we remember more episodic memories from faces than from names?
Barsics, Catherine ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg

Poster (2009)

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember ... [more ▼]

This study was aimed at investigating whether the recognition of familiar faces is more likely to be associated with an experience of Remembering than the recognition of familiar names. Using the Remember/Know paradigm the proportions of episodic memories recalled following the recognition of famous faces and names (Conditions) were assessed. Presented faces and names were previously judged by an independent group of participants as eliciting an equivalent level of familiarity. Nevertheless significant differences between the two conditions appeared in hit and false alarm rates. However, present results showed no significant difference in the recollection of personal memories (Remember responses conditionalized on the hits), following familiar faces compared with familiar names recognition. This finding contrasts with recent accounts assuming that faces are more prone to yield episodic memories than other cues to person identity. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (11 ULg)