References of "Baril, G"
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See detailFollicular status and embryo production in Ouled Djellal (Algeria) ewes breed pretreated with a GnRH agonist
Gharbi, I; Ferrouk, M; Dechicha, A et al

in Asian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances (2012), 7(2), 117-127

Variability in ovulation rate and number of embryos in response to superovulation is the main limiting factor in small ruminants transfer programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ovarian ... [more ▼]

Variability in ovulation rate and number of embryos in response to superovulation is the main limiting factor in small ruminants transfer programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ovarian follicular status and in vivo embryo production in Ouled djellal ewes following a pre-treatment with a Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist. Twenty (n = 20) cycling ewes were allotted into two groups, the first (n = 10) received subcutaneously a daily injection of 40 micrograms buserelin for 14 days prior to superovulatory treatment (pretreated group) while the second group (n = 10) did not receive GnRH agonist before superovulatory treatment (control group). Before batching, the ovarian follicular population was assessed by laparoscopy numbering of the ovarian follicles. In the pretreated ewes, a significant increase in small follicles (8.50±1.64 vs. 15.50±2.74, p<0.01) and a suppression of large follicles (≥4 mm) (4, 3±0.76 vs. 0.0, p<0.001) was observed after treatment with Buserelin. In addition to the pretreated group, the number of small follicles prior to porcine Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (pFSH) treatment was higher and the number of large follicles smaller than the control group. The ovulatory response and the number of transferable embryos per ewe treated was significantly higher in ewes pretreated than in control ewes (ovulatory response: 17,8±1,56 vs. 9,1±1,11; p<0.001) (transferable embryos: 10.2±1.87 vs. 4.1±0.40, p≤0.01). Compared to the pretreated group a higher percentage of degenerated embryos was recorded in the control group (control: 20.40 vs. 7.27 pretreated, p<0.05). The pre-treatment with a GnRHa to the superovulation protocol improve embryo production in Ouled Djellal ewes, in allowing the terminal follicular growth inhibition and increasing of small follicles number at the start of p FSH treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailSex and PRNP genotype determination in preimplantation caprine embryos
Guignot, F.; Perreau, C.; Cavarroc, C. et al

in Reproduction in Domestic Animals (2011), 46(4), 656-663

The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of genotype diagnosis after whole amplification of DNA extracted from biopsies obtained by trimming goat embryos and to evaluate the viability of ... [more ▼]

The objective of this study was to test the accuracy of genotype diagnosis after whole amplification of DNA extracted from biopsies obtained by trimming goat embryos and to evaluate the viability of biopsied embryos after vitrification/warming and transfer. Whole genome amplification (WGA) was performed using Multiple Displacement Amplification (MDA). Sex and prion protein (PRNP) genotypes were determined. Sex diagnosis was carried out by PCR amplification of ZFX/ZFY and Y chromosome-specific sequences. Prion protein genotype determination was performed on codons 142, 154, 211, 222 and 240. Embryos were collected at day 7 after oestrus and biopsied either immediately after collection (blastocysts and expanded blastocysts) or after 24 h of in vitro culture (compacted morulae). Biopsied embryos were frozen by vitrification. Vitrified whole embryos were kept as control. DNA of biopsies was extracted and amplified using MDA. Sex diagnosis was efficient for 97.4% of biopsies and PRNP genotyping was determined in 78.7% of biopsies. After embryo transfer, no significant difference was observed in kidding rate between biopsied and vitrified control embryos, whereas embryo survival rate was different between biopsied and whole vitrified embryos (p = 0.032). At birth, 100% of diagnosed sex and 98.2% of predetermined codons were correct. Offspring PRNP profiles were in agreement with parental genotype. Whole genome amplification with MDA kit coupled with sex diagnosis and PRNP genotype predetermination are very accurate techniques to genotype goat embryos before transfer. These novel results allow us to plan selection of scrapie-resistant genotypes and kid sex before transfer of cryopreserved embryo. [less ▲]

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See detailEmbryo transfer as a tool for experimental reproduction of ovine herds.
Rizzo, H.; François, D.; Fassier, T. et al

in Ciência Animal Brasileira (2009), Suppl 1

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See detailIn vitro maturation treatment affects developmental competence of laparoscopic ovum pickup-derived oocytes in follicle-stimulating hormone-stimulated goats
Locatelli, Y; Poulin, N; Baril, G et al

in Reproduction, Fertility, & Development (2008), 20(1), 182-183

The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of IVM treatment on the developmental competence of oocytes recovered from repeated laparoscopic ovum pickukp (LOPU) in goats. A total of 94 LOPU ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of IVM treatment on the developmental competence of oocytes recovered from repeated laparoscopic ovum pickukp (LOPU) in goats. A total of 94 LOPU sessions were performed on 33 adult goats of the Saanen and Alpine breeds. Females were synchronized (Day 0) during the nonbreeding season by inserting vaginal sponges (45 mg of fluorogestone acetate, Intervet, Boxmeer, The Netherlands). At Day 8, an i.m. injection of 50 μg of cloprostenol (Estrumate; Schering-Plough Animal Health, Pointe-Claire, Quebec, Canada) was administered. Porcine FSH (Stimufol, Merial, Brussels, Belgium, 160 mg/goat) was administered in 5 injections at 12-h intervals, starting on Day 8. The LOPU took place under general anesthesia on Day 11, and follicles ≥2 mm were aspirated with an 18-gauge needle connected to a controlled vacuum system. Vaginal sponges were removed at the time of LOPU. Treatments were repeated 2 times in a 2-week interval scheme (2 goats and 1 goat were excluded from the experiment during the second and third LOPU sessions, respectively). Cumulus–oocyte complexes were washed and evaluated for quality (graded from 1 to 3). Oocytes recovered from unstimulated slaughterhouse-derived ovaries served as a control. Cumulus–oocytes complexes from Grades 1 and 2 were submitted to IVM in TCM-199, supplemented with 100 μm of cysteamine and either 10 ng mL–1 of epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 10% follicular fluid and 100 ng mL–1 of ovine FSH (FF-FSH). Matured oocytes were then submitted to IVF and in vitro development as described by Cognié et al. (2004 Reprod. Fertil. Dev. 16, 437–445). Over the 94 LOPU sessions, 20.4 ± 0.9 follicles were aspirated (mean ± SEM), allowing the recovery of 12.3 ± 0.7 COC per goat and per session, of which 80.1% were suitable for IVM (Grades 1 and 2). Results of in vitro production are detailed in the table. The IVM treatment did not significantly affect cleavage or blastocyst development rates in oocytes derived from slaughterhouse ovaries. Cleavage rates were significantly decreased in LOPU-derived oocytes when compared with control oocytes. For LOPU-derived oocytes, cleavage and final blastocyst development rates were increased significantly and kinetics of embryo development were accelerated when FF-FSH was used during IVM as compared with EGF. The IVM with FF-FSH allowed us to produce 4.1 blatocysts per goat per LOPU session. These results demonstrate the interest in LOPU for goat embryo production once appropriate IVM treatment is used. The difference observed between LOPU and slaughterhouse oocytes in terms of response to IVM treatments may be related to FSH stimulation prior to the LOPU session or to postmortem changes in oocyte responsiveness in the slaughterhouse group. [less ▲]

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See detailLack of risk of transmission of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) after an appropriate embryo transfer procedure
Ali Al Ahmad, M. Z.; Chebloune, Y.; Bouzar, Amel ULg et al

in Theriogenology (2008)

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See detailImproved vitrification method allowing direct transfer of goat embryos
Guignot, F.; Bouttier, A.; Baril, G. et al

in Theriogenology (2006), 66(4), 1004-1011

The aim of this study was to design a vitrification method suited to field embryo transfer experiments in goat. In a first experiment, a standard vitrification protocol, previously designed for sheep ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to design a vitrification method suited to field embryo transfer experiments in goat. In a first experiment, a standard vitrification protocol, previously designed for sheep embryos was compared to slow freezing of goat embryos. No significant difference was observed on kidding rate (48% versus 69%, respectively), nor on embryo survival rate (35% versus 45%). Second experiment: all embryos were vitrified. After warming, embryos were either transferred directly (direct transfer), or after in vitro dilution of the cryoprotectants (conventional transfer). The kidding rate was not affected by the transfer method (38% versus 23%, respectively). However, embryo survival rate tended to be higher after direct transfer (26% versus 14%). Third experiment: OPS vitrification was compared to standard vitrification. The kidding rate was not affected (22% versus 39%, respectively), but the embryo survival rate was lower after OPS (14% versus 28%). Fourth experiment: 0.4 M sucrose was added with cryoprotectants in vitrification. The kidding rate after direct transfer was significantly enhanced after addition of sucrose (56% versus 27%, respectively), whereas embryo survival rate was not significantly affected (32% versus 18%). Fifth experiment: vitrification with sucrose supplementation was compared to slow freezing. No significant difference was observed after direct transfer on kidding rate (52% versus 31%, respectively), but embryo survival rate tended to be higher after vitrification (34% versus 2 1 %). In conclusion, our results indicate that addition of 0.4 M sucrose in association with direct transfer improves significantly the viability of goat vitrified embryos. [less ▲]

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See detailThe viability of in vitro produced sheep embryos is negatively affected by the presence of estradiol during in vitro maturation
Poulin, N.; Cognié, Y.; Baril, G. et al

in Reproduction in Domestic Animals (2005), 40(4), 92

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See detailKidding and embryo survival rate after traditional or direct transfer of frozen/thawed goat embryons
Baril, G.; Pougnard, J. L.; Leboeuf, B. et al

in Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Animal Reproduction (2004)

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See detailEffet de prétraitements agoniste et antagoniste de GnRH sur la production d’embryons chez la brebis et la chèvre
Baril, G.; Cognié, Y.; Belloc, J. P. et al

in Proceedings: 11e Rencontres autour des Recherches sur les Ruminants (3R) (2004)

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See detailDiagnostic et suivi de gestation chez la chèvre et la brebis
Melo de Sousa, Noelita ULg; Gonzalez, F.; Karen, A. et al

Scientific conference (2004)

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See detailIn vitro survival of vitrified goat embryos: comparison of two vitrification methods
Guignot, F.; Baril, G.; Pougnard, J. L. et al

in Proceedings: 17e Réunion A.E.T.E. (2001)

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See detailFour years of induction/synchronization of estrus in dairy goats: effect on the evolution of eCG binding rate in relation with the parameters of reproduction
Drion, Pierre ULg; Furtoss, V.; Baril, G. et al

in Reproduction Nutrition Development (2001), 41(5), 401-412

Ninety-eight Alpine goats of two herds were followed over 4 years in a program of annual artificial insemination after estrus induction/synchronization, including progestagen administration (vaginal ... [more ▼]

Ninety-eight Alpine goats of two herds were followed over 4 years in a program of annual artificial insemination after estrus induction/synchronization, including progestagen administration (vaginal sponge) followed by prostaglandin analog and equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) 48 h before sponge removal. Goats were sampled every 4 hours from the 16th to the 56th following sponge removal, for determination of LH surge and tested for estrus by the presence of a buck. Seven days after AI, endoscopic examination of the ovaries was performed to determine the number of corpus lutea. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed at day 21-22 post AI by determination of plasma progesterone and at day 40-45 by ultrasonography. Parturition, number and sex of kids were recorded. All the goats were sampled before and after each treatment, for anti-eCG antibodies screening. Statistical analysis of the results clearly established a significant effect of the treatments on anti-eCG antibodies. Time of estrus and LH surge were significantly different between herd. The antibodies significantly delayed the time of coming out of estrus as well as the time of LH surge. Two antagonistic effects were evidenced: first, the delayed of time of estrus and time of LH surge in relation with the immune reaction to eCG; secondly, the ahead of time of estrus and time of LH surge during the years of treatment, identical to both herd. The antibodies negatively influenced the percentage of ovulating females as well as kidding rate. Finally, no effect of antibodies on prolificacy was found. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes annual repetition of estrous induction influence the fertility of goats after A.I. at a fixed time ?
Drion, Pierre ULg; Furstoss, V.; Baril, G. et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2001), 5(1), 28-29

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See detailEffets de la répétition des traitements Progestagènes/PMSG chez la chèvre
Baril, G.; Leboeuf, B.; Remy, Benoit et al

(1998, April 30)

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See detailSynchronization of estrus in goats: the relationship between PMSG binding in plasma, time of occurrence of estrus and fertility following artificial insemination
Baril, G.; Remy, Benoît ULg; Leboeuf, J. F. et al

in Theriogenology (1996), 45(8), 1553-1559

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to measure plasma eCG binding in dairy goats (n = 524) at the beginning of a progestagen/eCG treatment and 25 d after eCG administration. The eCG binding was not dependent ... [more ▼]

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to measure plasma eCG binding in dairy goats (n = 524) at the beginning of a progestagen/eCG treatment and 25 d after eCG administration. The eCG binding was not dependent on the age of the females but increased with the number of treatments they had previously received (3.4 % ± 4.8, N = 47 vs 9.6 % ± 13.2, N = 249; mean ± SD; P < 0.01 for goats treated 0 and 1 time vs those treated 2 to 5 times, respectively). The synchronization treatment led to an increase in the binding of eCG (7.1 % ± 10.9 before vs 28.3 ± 24.5 after treatment; P < 0.01). When eCG binding before treatment was higher than 5 % the onset of estrus was delayed: 37.9 % of goats came into estrus more than 30 h after sponge removal vs 7.4 % when eCG binding was lower than 5 % (P < 0.01). Fertility was significantly decreased when eCG binding was higher than 10 %. These results show that the repetition of treatment with eCG to induce estrus in goats increases eCG binding. This could explain the lowered efficiency of the hormonal treatment to synchronize estrus and the associated decrease in fertility when goats are inseminated at a predetermined time. [less ▲]

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See detailAre porcine follicle stimulating hormone antibodies associated with decreased superovulatory response in goat ?
Beckers, Jean-François ULg; Baril, G; Vallet, JC et al

in Theriogenology (1990), 33(1), 192

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