References of "Bahri, Mohamed Ali"
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See detailEffects of aging on task- and stimulus-related cerebral attention networks
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2016), 44

Interactions between a dorsal attention (DAN) and a ventral attention cerebral network (VAN) have been reported in young participants during attention or short term memory (STM) tasks. Since it remains an ... [more ▼]

Interactions between a dorsal attention (DAN) and a ventral attention cerebral network (VAN) have been reported in young participants during attention or short term memory (STM) tasks. Since it remains an under-investigated question, age effects on DAN and VAN activity and their functional balance were explored during performance of a STM task. Older and young groups showed similar behavioral patterns of results. At the cerebral level, DAN activation increased as a function of increasing STM load in both groups, suggesting preserved activity in DAN during healthy aging. Age-related over-recruitment in regions of the DAN in the higher task load raised the question of compensation attempt versus less efficient use of neural resources in older adults. Lesser decrease of VAN activation with increasing load and decreased stimulus-driven activation in the VAN, especially in the higher load, in older participants suggested age-related reduced response in the VAN. However, functional connectivity measures showed that VAN was still functionally connected to the DAN in older participants. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of COMT single nucleotide polymorphism (rs4680) on the neural substrates of working memory representations maintenance in healthy aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2016, May 10)

The COMT val108/158met polymorphism was associated to the dopaminergic modulation in the brain, and therefore stimulated research on its influence for cognitive functioning and particularly working memory ... [more ▼]

The COMT val108/158met polymorphism was associated to the dopaminergic modulation in the brain, and therefore stimulated research on its influence for cognitive functioning and particularly working memory. First, a general advantage of carrying the met allele was reported. However, many studies used tasks that did not allow efficiently assessing the contribution of manipulation and maintenance processes in working memory, leading to divergent results, in both young and older populations, resulting in debates about the exact phenotypic effect of the COMT polymorphism. Using fMRI, this study was designed to assess the potential effect of the COMT polymorphism on age-related differences in working memory representations maintenance abilities (Sternberg paradigm). Partial Least Squares method was used to determine the brain-behavior correlations at low, intermediate, and high cognitive demands among young and older groups, homozygous for the val or for the met allele. First, young val/val showed some disadvantages at brain and behavioral level compared to their m/m counterparts. However, in older adults subgroups, the m/m participants tended to show greater age-related difference (when compared to younger adults with similar genotype), suggesting an advantage in carrying the val allele when dopamine signaling is not at optimal efficiency (optimal: young/middle adulthood vs suboptimal: childhood or older ages). These results will be discussed in regard to compensating theories and dopaminergic models accounting for the potential effect of COMT polymorphism on stability/flexibility abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailFeasibility study of repetitive diffusion MRI after Neoadjuvant radiotherapy for following tumor microenvironment.
LALLEMAND, François ULg; Leroi, Natacha ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Conference (2016, March 22)

Purpose/Objective. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is mostly driven by the occurrence ... [more ▼]

Purpose/Objective. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is mostly driven by the occurrence of side effects or the tumor downsizing. We previously demonstrated in an in vivo model that the timing of surgery and the schedule of NeoRT influenced the tumor dissemination. Here, our aim is to evaluate with functional MRI (fMRI) the impact of the radiation treatment on the tumor microenvironment and subsequently to identify non-invasive markers helping to determine the best timing to perform surgery for avoiding tumor spreading. First, we needed to demonstrate the feasibility of repetitive MRI imaging after NeoRT in mice. Material/methods. We used two models of NeoRT we previously developed in mice: MDA-MB 231 and 4T1 cells implanted in the flank of mice. When tumors reached the planned volume, they are irradiated with 2x5 Gy and then surgically removed at different time points after RT. In the mean time between the end of RT and the surgical procedure, mice were imaged in a 9,4T Agilent® MRI. Diffusion Weighted (DW) -MRI was performed every 2 days between RT and surgery. For each tumors we acquired 8 slices of 1 mm thickness and 0.5 mm gap with an “in plane voxel resolution” of 0.5 mm. For DW-MRI, we performed FSEMS (Fast Spin Echo MultiSlice) sequences, with 9 different B-values (from 40 to 1000) and B0, in the 3 main directions. We also performed IVIM (IntraVoxel Incoherent Motion) analysis, in the aim to obtain information on intravascular diffusion, related to perfusion (F: perfusion factor) and subsequently tumor vessels perfusion. Results. As preliminary results, with the MBA-MB 231 we observed a significant increase of F at day 6 after irradiation than a decrease and stabilization until surgery. No other modifications of the MRI signal, ADC, D or D* were observed. We observed similar results with 4T1 cells, F increased at day 3 than returned to initial signal. The difference in the timing of the peak of F can be related to the difference in tumor growth between MBA-MB 231 and 4T1 (four weeks vs one week). Conclusion. For the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of repetitive fMRI imaging in mice models after NeoRT. With these models, we show a significant peak of the perfusion factor (F) at day 6 or day 3. This change occurs between the two previous time points of surgery demonstrating a difference in the metastatic spreading. Indeed, after a NeoRT of 2X5Gy we observed more metastases in the lung when MDA-MB 231 tumor bearing mice are operated 4 days after RT compared to 11 days. These preliminary results are very promising for identifying noninvasive markers for determining the best timing for surgery. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between grey matter integrity and executive abilities in aging
Manard, Marine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Brain Research (2016), 1642

This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate grey matter changes that occur in healthy aging and the relationship between grey matter characteristics and executive functioning. Thirty-six young ... [more ▼]

This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate grey matter changes that occur in healthy aging and the relationship between grey matter characteristics and executive functioning. Thirty-six young adults (18 to 30 years old) and 43 seniors (60 to 75 years old) were included. A general executive score was derived from a large battery of neuropsychological tests assessing three major aspects of executive functioning (inhibition, updating and shifting). Age-related grey matter changes were investigated by comparing young and older adults using voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness methods. A widespread difference in grey matter volume was found across many brain regions, whereas cortical thinning was mainly restricted to central areas. Multivariate analyses showed age-related changes in relatively similar brain regions to the respective univariate analyses but appeared more limited. Finally, in the older adult sample, a significant relationship between global executive performance and decreased grey matter volume in anterior (i.e. frontal, insular and cingulate cortex) but also some posterior brain areas (i.e. temporal and parietal cortices) as well as subcortical structures was observed. Results of this study highlight the distribution of age-related effects on grey matter volume and show that cortical atrophy does not appear primarily in “frontal” brain regions. From a cognitive viewpoint, age-related executive functioning seems to be related to grey matter volume but not to cortical thickness. Therefore, our results also highlight the influence of methodological aspects (from preprocessing to statistical analysis) on the pattern of results, which could explain the lack of consensus in literature. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrelation between resting state fMRI total neuronal activity and PET metabolism in healthy controls and patients with disorders of consciousness
Soddu, Andrea ULg; Gomez, Francisco; Heine, Lizette ULg et al

in Brain and Behavior (2016)

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The mildly invasive 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a well-established imaging technique to measure ‘resting state’ cerebral metabolism. This technique made it possible to assess changes in metabolic activity in clinical applications, such as the study of severe brain injury and disorders of consciousness. Objective: We assessed the possi- bility of creating functional MRI activity maps, which could estimate the rela- tive levels of activity in FDG-PET cerebral metabolic maps. If no metabolic absolute measures can be extracted, our approach may still be of clinical use in centers without access to FDG-PET. It also overcomes the problem of recogniz- ing individual networks of independent component selection in functional mag- netic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state analysis. Methods: We extracted resting state fMRI functional connectivity maps using independent component analysis and combined only components of neuronal origin. To assess neu- ronality of components a classification based on support vector machine (SVM) was used. We compared the generated maps with the FDG-PET maps in 16 healthy controls, 11 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients and four locked-in patients. Results: The results show a significant similarity with q = 0.75  0.05 for healthy controls and q = 0.58  0.09 for vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients between the FDG- PET and the fMRI based maps. FDG-PET, fMRI neuronal maps, and the conjunction analysis show decreases in frontoparietal and medial regions in vegetative patients with respect to controls. Subsequent analysis in locked-in syndrome patients produced also consistent maps with healthy controls. Conclusions: The constructed resting state fMRI functional connectivity map points toward the possibility for fMRI resting state to estimate relative levels of activity in a metabolic map. [less ▲]

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See detailNeural correlates of event clusters in past and future thoughts: How the brain integrates specific episodes with autobiographical knowledge
Demblon, Julie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg

in NeuroImage (2016), 127

When remembering the past or envisioning the future, events often come to mind in organized sequences or stories rather than in isolation from one another. The aim of the present fMRI study was to ... [more ▼]

When remembering the past or envisioning the future, events often come to mind in organized sequences or stories rather than in isolation from one another. The aim of the present fMRI study was to investigate the neural correlates of such event clusters. Participants were asked to consider pairs of specific past or future events: in one condition, the two events were part of the same event cluster (i.e., they were thematically and/or causally related to each other), whereas in another condition the two events only shared a surface feature (i.e., their location); a third condition was also included, in which the two events were unrelated to each other. The results showed that the processing of past and future events that were part of a same cluster was associated with higher activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), rostrolateral PFC, and left lateral temporal and parietal regions, compared to the two other conditions. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses revealed an increased coupling between these cortical regions. These findings suggest that largely similar processes are involved in organizing events in clusters for the past and the future. The medial and rostrolateral PFC might play a pivotal role in mediating the integration of specific events with conceptual autobiographical knowledge ‘stored’ in more posterior regions. Through this integrative process, this set of brain regions might contribute to the attribution of an overarching meaning to representations of specific past and future events, by contextualizing them with respect to personal goals and general knowledge about one's life story. [less ▲]

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See detailMultimodality imaging assessment of the deleterious role of the intraluminal thrombus on the growth of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat model
NCHIMI LONGANG, Alain ULg; Courtois, Audrey ULg; EL HACHEMI, Mounia ULg et al

in European Radiology (2015), online

Objectives To evaluate imaging changes occurring in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with emphasis on the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) occurrence. Methods The post-induction ... [more ▼]

Objectives To evaluate imaging changes occurring in a rat model of elastase-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), with emphasis on the intraluminal thrombus (ILT) occurrence. Methods The post-induction growth of the AAA diameter was characterized using ultrasound in 22 rats. ILT was reported on 13 rats that underwent 14 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 2-18 days post-surgery, and on 10 rats that underwent 18 fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/microcomputed tomography examinations 2-27 days post-surgery. Logistic regressions were used to establish the evolution with time of AAA length, diameter, ILT thickness, volume, stratification, MRI and FDG PET signalling properties, and histological assessment of inflammatory infiltrates. Results All of the following significantly increased with time post-induction (p < 0.001): AAA length, AAA diameter, ILT maximal thickness, ILT volume, ILT iron content and related MRI signalling changes, quantitative uptake on FDG PET, and the magnitude of inflammatory infiltrates on histology. However, the aneurysm growth peak followed occurrence of ILT approximately 6 days after elastase infusion. Conclusion Our model emphasizes that occurrence of ILT precedes AAA peak growth. Aneurysm growth is associated with increasing levels of iron, signalling properties changes in both MRI and FDG PET, relating to its biological activities. [less ▲]

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See detailMonte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using gate.
Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Luxen, André ULg et al

in Medical Physics (2015), 42(10), 5711-5719

Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120 microCT, which might alter physiological parameters in a longitudinal study setup. [less ▲]

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See detailEVALUATION OF SV2Alox/Cre TRANSGENIC MOUSE USING [18F]UCB-H IN IN VITRO AUTORADIOGRAPHY
Serrano Navacerrada, Maria Elisa ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg; MENTEN, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking. Interestingly, the SV2A has been identify as the binding site for ... [more ▼]

Background: SV2A is the most studied isoform of the Synaptic Vesicle 2 proteins, which are involved in the synaptic vesicle trafficking. Interestingly, the SV2A has been identify as the binding site for the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam, showing a close relation between the epilepsy, the dysregulation of the SV2A levels and the response to antiepileptic medications. SV2A floxed-mice were developed using a cre-lox technique, leading to a strong decrease of SV2A expression in the CA3 field of the hippocampus. We aim here to validate this model using [18F]UCB-H, a novel PET imaging radiotracer with a nanomolar affinity for human SV2A. Methods: In vitro autoradiography were performed on SV2Alox/Cre+ transgenic mouse brain slices. SV2Alox/Cre- mouse was used as control. To obtain a structural reference, brain slices underwent eosin-haematoxylin staining. Images of both procedures were coregistered using π-PMOD software. Regions of interest (Dentate Gyrus, CA1, CA2 and CA3) were drawn according to a stereotaxic atlas of the mouse brain. Results: Analyses showed significant differences in radiotracer binding (p<0.001) between SV2Alox/Cre+ mouse and SV2Alox/Cre- mouse highlighting an important reduction for the labelling density in Ammon's horn, particularly in CA1, compared to Dentate Gyrus where the diminution was less marked. Conclusions: Here, we used the radiotracer [18F]UCB-H to probe the decreased expression of SV2A protein in the hippocampus of SV2Alox/Cre+ mouse versus SV2Alox/Cre- control mouse. Our results contribute to the validation of the model, and encourage us to proceed with further longitudinal and behavioural studies. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo quantification of dopaminergic terminals loss in Parkinson’s Disease rat model: comparison between [18F]FMT and [18F]FDOPA.
Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Michel, Anne et al

Poster (2015, September 02)

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as unilaterally lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful to evaluate novel antiparkinsonian therapies. MicroPET imaging, using L-3 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as unilaterally lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful to evaluate novel antiparkinsonian therapies. MicroPET imaging, using L-3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-phenylalanine ([18F]FDOPA) allows longitudinal evaluations of DA terminals loss. However, chemical structure of [18F]FDOPA leads to suboptimal PET imaging. 18F-fluoro-m-tyrosine ([18F]FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. So far, there are no available quantitative PET studies comparing the two methods in hemiparkinsonian rats. In this study, we compare imaging data provided by [18F]FMT PET and [18F]FDOPA PET in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic PET with both [18F]FMT and [18F]FDOPA. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Six days after the last PET scan, rats were sacrificed, and striatum were rapidly removed for striatal DA and metabolites quantification. Results: Striatal accumulation was observed for both tracers. However, while the administration of [18F]FDOPA required two peripheral inhibitors (benserazide and entacapone), only benserazide is needed with [18F]FMT. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of both [18F]FMT and [18F]DOPA accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001 for [18F]FMT and p<0.05 for [18F]DOPA) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.001 for both tracers). The DA content in the ipsilateral striatum was significantly lower (p<0.001) than in the contralateral striatum in the 6-OHDA-injected group, whereas such difference was not measured with the sham group. This indicate that [18F]FMT PET is as effective as [18F]DOPA PET to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Conclusions: Our results are in agreement with data reporting correlation between these two tracers in a Non-human primate model of PD. The sensitivity of the data quantification obtained in this study, confirms the interest to pursue longitudinal investigations with [18F]FMT to monitor dopaminergic dysfunction in a more progressive preclinical model of PD. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral functional connectivity periodically (de)synchronizes with anatomical constraints
Liegeois, Raphaël ULg; Ziegler, Erik; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Brain Structure and Function (2015)

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the link between resting-state functional connectivity (FC), measured by the correlations of the fMRI BOLD time courses, and structural connectivity (SC), estimated through fiber tractography. Instead of a static analysis based on the correlation between SC and the FC averaged over the entire fMRI time series, we propose a dynamic analysis, based on the time evolution of the correlation between SC and a suitably windowed FC. Assessing the statistical significance of the time series against random phase permutations, our data show a pronounced peak of significance for time window widths around 20-30 TR (40-60 sec). Using the appropriate window width, we show that FC patterns oscillate between phases of high modularity, primarily shaped by anatomy, and phases of low modularity, primarily shaped by inter-network connectivity. Building upon recent results in dynamic FC, this emphasizes the potential role of SC as a transitory architecture between different highly connected resting state FC patterns. Finally, we show that networks implied in consciousness-related processes, such as the default mode network (DMN), contribute more to these brain-level fluctuations compared to other networks, such as the motor or somatosensory networks. This suggests that the fluctuations between FC and SC are capturing mind-wandering effects. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]UCB-H as a new PET radiotracer for Synaptic vesicle protein 2A: A first clinical trial.
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Stifkens, M; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Nucleaire Geneeskunde (2015, May 09), 37(3), 1457-1458

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is ... [more ▼]

The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is widely distributed in the brain and has been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. The critical role of SV2A in proper nervous system function is shown, e.g., by the fact that it is a binding site and the primary mechanism of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam. This drug has recently been suggested to reduce synaptic deficits in a mouse model for Alzheimer’s disease. We here aimed to investigate the cerebral distribution of [18F]UCB-H, which has a high affinity with the SV2A. Dynamic PET data of the head of 4 healthy volunteers were acquired over 100 minutes after injection of 170.4 ± 24.9 MBq of GMP produced [18F]UCB-H. The arterial input function (IF) was obtained by blood sampling but also derived from the dynamic data using the correlation coefficient method. Blood data revealed a consistent amount of [18F]UCB-H in whole blood and plasma indicating a very low degree of binding of the tracer to the red blood cells. The unchanged fraction of [18F]UCB-H in plasma showed a bi-exponential behavioral decrease with a starting fraction of 92% of the injected amount of the tracer, measured at 3 min post injection. This fraction decreased to about 50% at 10 min post injection. The image-derived arterial IFs showed to be very similar to the measured ones with a peak-ratio around 0.91 and an area-under-curve ratio about 0.98. The PET images showed a high and rapid uptake of [18F]UCB-H in the grey matter structures, matching the known ubiquitous distribution of the SV2A in the brain. The kinetics of the tracer in the brain was characterized by an initial high uptake phase followed by rapid washout. For the three standard compartmental models (1-tissue, 2-tissue, and Logan Plot), similar results were obtained with both the measured and image-derived IFs. Nevertheless the two-tissue compartment model fitted the experimental data best and provided a total distribution volume of the [18F]UCB-H in the brain greater than 7 mL/cm3 and a specific distribution volume around 3 mL/cm3. Our results suggest that [18F]UCB-H is a good candidate as radiotracer for brain SV2A proteins and could be used for human studies (dosimetry has already been reported elsewhere). Image-derived IF showed to be useful for quantitative studies without the need to the arterial blood sampling. This new tracer could help to assess SV2A modifications in neurological pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease. [less ▲]

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See detail[18F]FMT: a reliable PET tracer for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease rat model.
Seret, Alain ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 09)

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is ... [more ▼]

Background: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-[18F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-[18F]FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate of DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. However, there are currently no available quantitative PET studies using [18F]FMT in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of in vivo PET study using [18F]FMT on 6-OHDA PD’s model. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic [18F]FMT PET, 30 min after benserazide pretreatment. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Results: Striatal accumulation of [18F]FMT was observed in rats pretreated with benserazide, a peripheral AAAD inhibitor. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of [18F]FMT accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.005). The Ki ratio (Ipsi./Contra.) was equivalent to 94% in the sham group and dropped to 41% in the lesioned group. Conclusions: [18F]FMT PET enables us to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results encourage us to pursue further investigations in a longitudinal way and to monitor the progression of the dopaminergic dysfunction in more moderate and gradual preclinical PD models. [less ▲]

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See detailPartial volume effect impact on PET preclinical dosimetry: a simulation study
Seret, Alain ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bretin, Florian et al

Conference (2015, May 09)

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See detailStrategies of regioselective radiolabeling of Nanofitin binder for imaging
Goux, Marine ULg; Dammicco, Sylvestre ULg; Becker, Guillaume ULg et al

Poster (2015, May)

Recently, new strategies emerged in the field of monoclonal antibodies radiolabeling for PET imaging with the use of positron emitter such as fluorine-18, zirconium-89 or gallium-68. Despite their ... [more ▼]

Recently, new strategies emerged in the field of monoclonal antibodies radiolabeling for PET imaging with the use of positron emitter such as fluorine-18, zirconium-89 or gallium-68. Despite their important role in the therapeutic world, antibodies have many disadvantages related to their structure. Moreover, conjugation of chelating agent often occurs on lysines, which is non-regioselective and leads to a heterogeneous mixture of products. In addition, the slow clearance of antibodies can be a problem to obtain a good contrast when they are used in imaging. To address these different limitations, we developed a chemistry-free chelating system consisting of a highly phosphorylatable peptide tag fused genetically to a Nanofitin. A specific phosphorylation step, with the alpha subunit of the casein kinase II, generates a nanocluster of 4 phosphates that can interact strongly with metal ion like zirconium or gallium. This strategy has already demonstrated its powerfulness for the stable and specific anchoring of protein on zirconium phosphonate-based microarray [1]. Considering this tag has been created to specifically anchoring protein on zirconium phosphonate-based microarray, we are currently working on a sequence derived from calcium-binding proteins to chelate specifically lanthanides[2]. As described by Pardoux et al.[3], our strategy is to functionalize this sequence with a phosphate nanocluster able to chelate zirconium or gallium. Our first results shown that a mono-phosphorylatable tag phosphorylated in vitro is able to chelate terbium(III) with a lower affinity than the wild type. Considering that terbium(III) is bigger than gallium(III) or zirconium(IV), we can suppose that the cage obtained is too small but suitable for other ions. In order to validate our hypothesis, we have planned to radiolabel those tags and determine their affinity for gallium(III). In order to validate the use of Nanofitin as a potent alternative tool for in vivo imaging, we have made biokinetic studies in mice with PET and MRI imaging. In these studies, we have radiolabelled with fluorine-18 a Nanofitin and we are currently making use of its specific binding to a cell-surface receptor to target a very precise cell population by using an animal model. Once the phosphorylatable tag optimized for regioselective radiolabelling and the Nanofitin targeting validated in an animal model, the next steps will be to combine these two approaches: we will fuse genetically the tag to the specific Nanofitin, radiolabel it with gallium-68 and perform the biokinetic study of this new radiopharmaceutical product. [1] M. Cinier, M. Petit, F. Pecorari, D. R. Talham, B. Bujoli, and C. Tellier, “Engineering of a phosphorylatable tag for specific protein binding on zirconium phosphonate based microarrays.,” J. Biol. Inorg. Chem., vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 399–407, Mar. 2012. [2] L. J. Martin, “Development of Lanthanide-Binding Tags (LBTs) as powerful and versatile peptides for use in studies of proteins and protein interactions,” 2008. [3] R. Pardoux, S. Sauge-merle, D. Lemaire, P. Delangle, L. Guilloreau, J. Adriano, and C. Berthomieu, “Modulating Uranium Binding Affinity in Engineered Calmodulin EF-Hand Peptides : Effect of Phosphorylation,” PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 8, 2012. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional MRI for predicting metastatic spreading at the time of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy
LALLEMAND, François ULg; Leroi, Natacha ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, April)

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is driven by the occurrence of side effects or the ... [more ▼]

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery is driven by the occurrence of side effects or the tumor downsizing. Some studies demonstrated that the timing of surgery and the RT schedule could influence tumor dissemination and subsequently patient overall survival. Our aim is to evaluate with functional MRI the impact of the radiation treatment on the tumor microenvironment and subsequently to determine the best timing to perform surgery for avoiding tumor spreading. [less ▲]

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See detail18F-FMT: a reliable PET tracer for in vivo evaluation of dopaminergic dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease rat model.
Becker, Guillaume ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Michel, Anne et al

Poster (2015, March 18)

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-18F-fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-18F-FMT) is ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Rat models of Parkinson’s disease (PD), such as lesioned rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), are useful for studying dopamine (DA)-related functions. 6-18F-fluoro-m-tyrosine (6-18F-FMT) is an effective PET tracer to evaluate of DA terminals integrity and L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) metabolic pathway. However, there are currently no available quantitative PET studies using 18F-FMT in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. In this context, we investigated the feasibility of in vivo PET study using 18F-FMT on 6-OHDA PD’s model. Methods: 10 µg of 6-OHDA were injected into the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB) of male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8). As control, sham-treated rats (n=8) were injected with vehicle only but otherwise treated identically. Striatal DA presynaptic activity was assessed by dynamic 18F-FMT-PET. Structural T2-weighted brain images were acquired on a 9.4T MRI and were used for co-registration. After normalization on a MRI template, kinetic analysis was performed by “Patlak Reference” model, using PMOD software. Results: Striatal accumulation of 18F-FMT was observed in rats pretreated with benserazide, a peripheral AAAD inhibitor. As consequence of the 6-OHDA-lesion, significant decrease of 18F-FMT accumulation was recorded in the striatum ipsilateral to the lesion. Lesioned rats had dramatically reduced uptake constant Ki in the ipsilateral striatum compared to the contralateral striatum (p<0.001) and to the ipsilateral striatum of sham-treated rats (p<0.005). The Ki ratio (Ipsi./Contra.) was equivalent to 94% in the sham group and dropped to 41% in the lesioned group. Conclusions: 18F-FMT PET enables us to quantify loss of DA presynaptic function in unilaterally 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These results encourage us to pursue further investigations in a longitudinal way and to monitor the progression of the dopaminergic dysfunction in more moderate and gradual preclinical PD models. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of predictive markers based on functional imaging of metastatic spreading at the time of surgery after neoadjuvant radiotherapy
LALLEMAND, François ULg; Leroi, Natacha ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery are driven by the occurrence of side effects or the ... [more ▼]

Neoadjuvant radiotherapy (NeoRT) improves tumor local control and tumor resection in many cancers. The timing between the end of the NeoRT and surgery are driven by the occurrence of side effects or the tumor downsizing. Some studies demonstrated that the timing of surgery and the RT schedule could influence tumor dissemination. Our aim is to evaluate with functional MRI the impact of the radiation treatment on the tumor microenvironment and subsequently to determine the best timing to perform surgery. We used a model of NeoRT, 4T1 cells were implanted in the flank of BalbC mice. Seven days after, tumors were irradiated with 2x5Gy than we surgically removed this lesion 11 days after RT. Diffusion Weighted (DW) and Dynamic Contrast Enhancement (DCE) -MRI was performed every 2 days during 11 days between RT and surgery. We developed a homemade “portacath” specifically dedicated for mice and for repetitive I.V. contrast agent injection. For DW-MRI, we performed sequences with 10 different B-value to achieve IntraVoxel Incoherent Motion analysis. For DCE-MRI, we used FSEMS sequence for keeping the same slices as with DW-MRI. For both images, we performed analysis on the entire tumor volume. We obtained very promising preliminary results showing good uniformity in the ADC (Attenuation Diffusion Coefficient). We succeeded to follow mice with imaging during the 11 days without major troubles. We observed less variability of the ADC signal during the 11 days in the irradiated tumors compared to the control. The signal to noise ratio was relatively poor for the diffusion sequence and need to be improved. For the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of repetitive MRI functional imaging in a mice model of NeoRT. These results open perspectives for studying modifications of the tumor microenvironment induced by neoadjuvant RT. The techniques need to be improved and correlated to the tumor dissemination in function of the RT schedule and timing of surgery. [less ▲]

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