References of "Bahri, Mohamed Ali"
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See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (in press)

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras delusion during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Rémi, Capa et al

in American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & Other Dementias (in press)

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since ... [more ▼]

Capgras delusion is characterized by the misidentification of people and by the delusional belief that the misidentified persons have been replaced by impostors, generally perceived as persecutors. Since little is known regarding the neural correlates of Capgras syndrome, the cerebral metabolic pattern of a patient with probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Capgras syndrome was compared with those of 24 healthy elderly subjects and 26 AD patients without delusional syndrome. Compared to the healthy and AD groups, the patient had significant hypometabolism in frontal and posterior midline structures. In light of current neural models of face perception, our patient’s Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailDorsomedial prefrontal metabolism and unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits in Alzheimer’s disease
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2014)

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while ... [more ▼]

Anosognosia is a complex symptom corresponding to a lack of awareness of one’s current clinical status. Anosognosia for cognitive deficits has frequently been described in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), while unawareness of current characteristics of personality traits has rarely been considered. We used a well-established questionnaire-based method in a group of 37 AD patients and in healthy controls to probe self- and hetero-evaluation of patients’ personality and we calculated differential scores between each participant’s and his/her relative’s judgments. A brain-behavior correlation was performed using FDG-PET images. The behavioral data showed that AD patients presented with anosognosia for current characteristics of their personality and their anosognosia was primarily explained by impaired third perspective taking. The brain-behavior correlation analysis revealed a negative relationship between anosognosia for current characteristics of personality and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dMPFC) activity. Behavioral and neuroimaging data are consistent with the view that impairment of different functions subserved by the dMPFC (self-evaluation, inferences regarding complex enduring dispositions of self and others, confrontation of perspectives in interpersonal scripts) plays a role in anosognosia for current characteristics of personality in AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailHybrid MicroPET Imaging for Dosimetric Applications in Mice: Improvement of Activity Quantification in Dynamic MicroPET Imaging for Accelerated Dosimetry Applied to 6-[ 18 F] Fluoro- L -DOPA and 2-[ 18 F]Fluoro- L -Tyrosine
Bretin, Florian ULg; Mauxion, T; Warnock, G et al

in Molecular Imaging and Biology (2013)

Purpose: Dynamic microPET imaging has advantages over traditional organ harvesting, but is pronetoquantificationerrorsinsmallvolumes.Hybridimaging,wheremicroPETactivitiesarecross- calibrated using post ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Dynamic microPET imaging has advantages over traditional organ harvesting, but is pronetoquantificationerrorsinsmallvolumes.Hybridimaging,wheremicroPETactivitiesarecross- calibrated using post scan harvested organs, can improve quantification. Organ harvesting, dynamic imaging and hybrid imaging were applied to determine the human and mouse radiation dosimetry of 6-[18 F]fluoro-L-DOPA and 2-[18 F]fluoro-L-tyrosine and compared. Procedures: Two-hour dynamic microPET imaging was performed with both tracers in four separate mice for 18 F-FDOPA and three mice for 18 F-FTYR. Organ harvesting was performed at 2, 5, 10, 30, 60 and 120 min post tracer injection with n=5 at each time point for 18 F-FDOPA and n=3 at each time point for 18 F-FTYR. Human radiation dosimetry projected from animal data was calculated for the three different approaches for each tracer using OLINDA/EXM. S- factors for the MOBY phantom were used to calculate the animal dosimetry. Results: Correlations between dose estimates based on organ harvesting and imaging was improved from r=0.997 to r=0.999 for 18 F-FDOPA and from r=0.985 to r=0.996 (p<0.0001 for all) for 18 F-FTYR by using hybrid imaging. Conclusion: Hybrid imaging yields comparable results to traditional organ harvesting while partially overcoming the limitations of pure imaging. It is an advantageous technique in terms of number of animals needed and labour involved. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance evaluation and X-ray dose quantification for various scanning protocols of the GE eXplore 120 micro-CT
Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey; Luxen, André ULg et al

in IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science (2013), 60(5), 3235-3241

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the General Electric eXplore 120 micro-CT regarding image quality and delivered dose of several protocols. Image quality (resolution, linearity ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the General Electric eXplore 120 micro-CT regarding image quality and delivered dose of several protocols. Image quality (resolution, linearity, uniformity and geometric accuracy) was assessed using the vmCT phantom developed for the GE eXplore Ultra, the QRM low contrast and the QRM Bar Pattern Phantom. All dose measurements were performed using a mobileMOSFET dose verification system and the CTDI100 and the MSAD were determined with a custom built PMMA phantom. Additionally, in vivo scans in sacrificed rats with different weights were acquired to assess dose, contrast and resolution variation due to X-ray absorption in surrounding tissue. The spatial resolution was determined as between 95 and 138 μm with a geometric accuracy of 0.1%. The system has a highly linear response to the iodine concentrations (0.937 to 30 mg/ml) for all protocols. The calculated CTDI100 ranged from 20.15 to 56.79 mGy and the MSAD from 27.98 to 77.45 mGy. The results were confirmed by in vivo scans in rats with different weights and no impact of body weight on delivered dose could be observed. However, body weight had a slight impact on image contrast and resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailIn vivo PET/CT in a human glioblastoma chicken chorioallantoic membrane model: A new tool for oncology and radiotracer development.
Warnock, Geoffrey; Turtoi, Andrei ULg; Blomme, Arnaud ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (2013), 54(10), 1-7

For many years the laboratory mouse has been used as the standard model for in vivo oncology research, particularly in the development of novel PET tracers, but the growth of tumors on chicken ... [more ▼]

For many years the laboratory mouse has been used as the standard model for in vivo oncology research, particularly in the development of novel PET tracers, but the growth of tumors on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) provides a more rapid, low cost and ethically sustainable alternative. For the first time, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo PET and CT imaging in a U87 glioblastoma tumor model on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), with the aim of applying this model for screening of novel PET tracers. Methods: U87 glioblastoma cells were implanted on the CAM at day 11 post-fertilization and imaged at day 18. A small animal imaging cell was used to maintain incubation and allow anesthesia using isoflurane. Radiotracers were injected directly into the exposed CAM vasculature. Sodium [18F]fluoride was used to validate the imaging protocol, demonstrating that image-degrading motion can be removed with anesthesia. Tumor glucose metabolism was imaged using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and tumor protein synthesis was imaged using 2-[18F]fluoro-L-tyrosine. Anatomical images were obtained by contrast enhanced CT, facilitating clear delineation of the tumor, delineation of tracer uptake in tumor versus embryo and accurate volume measurements. Results: PET imaging of tumor glucose metabolism and protein synthesis was successfully demonstrated in the CAM U87 glioblastoma model. Catheterization of CAM blood vessels facilitated dynamic imaging of glucose metabolism with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and demonstrated the ability to study PET tracer uptake over time in individual tumors, while CT imaging improved the accuracy of tumor volume measurements. Conclusion: In summary, we describe the novel application of PET/CT in the CAM tumor model, with optimization of typical imaging protocols. PET imaging in this valuable tumor model could prove particularly useful for rapid, high-throughput screening of novel radiotracers. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras syndrome during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Cappa, Rémi et al

Poster (2013, June)

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See detailPreclinical radiation dosimetry for the novel SV2A radiotracer [18F]UCB-H
Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research (2013), 3(1), 35

Background: [18F]UCB-H was developed as a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, the binding site for the antiepileptic levetiracetam. The objectives of this study were to ... [more ▼]

Background: [18F]UCB-H was developed as a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, the binding site for the antiepileptic levetiracetam. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the radiation dosimetry of [18F]UCB-H in a preclinical trial and to determine the maximum injectable dose according to guidelines for human biomedical research. The radiation dosimetry was derived by organ harvesting and dynamic micro positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in mice, and the results of both methods were compared. Methods: Twenty-four male C57BL-6 mice were injected with 6.96 ± 0.81 MBq of [18F]UCB-H, and the biodistribution was determined by organ harvesting at 2, 5, 10, 30, 60, and 120 min (n = 4 for each time point). Dynamic microPET imaging was performed on five male C57BL-6 mice after the injection of 9.19 ± 3.40 MBq of [18F]UCB-H. A theoretical dynamic bladder model was applied to simulate urinary excretion. Human radiation dose estimates were derived from animal data using the International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 tissue weighting factors. Results: Based on organ harvesting, the urinary bladder wall, liver and brain received the highest radiation dose with a resulting effective dose of 1.88E-02 mSv/MBq. Based on dynamic imaging an effective dose of 1.86E-02 mSv/MBq was calculated, with the urinary bladder wall and liver (brain was not in the imaging field of view) receiving the highest radiation. Conclusions: This first preclinical dosimetry study of [18F]UCB-H showed that the tracer meets the standard criteria for radiation exposure in clinical studies. The dose-limiting organ based on US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European guidelines was the urinary bladder wall for FDA and the effective dose for Europe with a maximum injectable single dose of approximately 325 MBq was calculated. Although microPET imaging showed significant deviations from organ harvesting, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient between radiation dosimetry derived by either method was 0.9666. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain dead yet mind alive: A positron emission tomography case study of brain metabolism in Cotard’s syndrome
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49(7), 1997-1999

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See detailRadiosynthesis and first small animal microPET imaging of [18F]UCB-H, a new fluorine-18 labelled tracer targeting synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A)
Aerts, Joël ULg; Otabashi, Muhamed; Giacomelli, Fabrice ULg et al

Conference (2013)

Aim. We report the radiosynthesis and first rat microPET imaging of a new fluorine-18 tracer targeting the synaptic vesicle protein 2A, SV2A, identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic drug ... [more ▼]

Aim. We report the radiosynthesis and first rat microPET imaging of a new fluorine-18 tracer targeting the synaptic vesicle protein 2A, SV2A, identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic drug levetiracetam. Materials and Method. Two different nucleophilic radiosynthesis pathways were tested to obtain [18F]UCB-H, a no-carrier-added tracer in the 2-[18F]fluoropyridine family. The methods were automated on FastLab™ synthesizers. PET studies in rodents were carried out using male SD rats, imaged under isoflurane anaesthesia in a Siemens Concorde Focus 120 microPET scanner. Arterial input function was measured using an arteriovenous shunt method and beta microprobe system. All animal protocols were reviewed and accepted by animal ethical committees. Results and conclusion. A radiosynthesis yield of 30% was obtained (uncorrected for decay, 150 minutes of synthesis). Analytical methods were developed and validated to demonstrate that the quality of the tracer solution was compatible with in vivo injection. After intravenous injection, the tracer rapidly entered the brain, followed by rapid washout. PET imaging revealed high uptake of the tracer in the brain and spinal cord, matching the expected SV2A homogeneous distribution. Results indicate that [18F]UCB-H is suitable to quantify SV2A proteins in vivo and to estimate target occupancy of drugs targeting SV2A. Acknowledgments. The authors thank UCB Pharma SA Belgium for collaboration and the Walloon Region Belgium and the FRNS Belgium for financial support. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolic and structural connectivity within the default mode network relates to working memory performance in young healthy adults
Yakushev, Igor; Chételat, Gael; Fischer F.U. et al

in NeuroImage (2013), 79

Studies of functional connectivity suggest that the default mode network (DMN) might be relevant for cognitive functions. Here, we examined metabolic and structural connectivity between major DMN nodes ... [more ▼]

Studies of functional connectivity suggest that the default mode network (DMN) might be relevant for cognitive functions. Here, we examined metabolic and structural connectivity between major DMN nodes, the posterior cingulate (PCC) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), in relation to normal working memory (WM). DMN was captured using independent component analysis of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) data from 35 young healthy adults (27.1±5.1 years). Metabolic connectivity, a correlation between FDG uptake in PCC and MPFC, was examined in groups of subjects with (relative to median) low (n=18) and high (n=17) performance on digit span backward test as an index of verbal WM. In addition, fiber tractography based on PCC and MPFC nodes as way points was performed in a subset of subjects. FDG uptake in the DMN nodes did not differ between high and low performers. However, significantly (p=0.01) lower metabolic connectivity was found in the group of low performers. Furthermore, as compared to high performers, low performers showed lower density of the left superior cingulate bundle. Verbal WM performance is related to metabolic and structural connectivity within the DMN in young healthy adults. Metabolic connectivity as quantified with FDG-PET might be a sensitive marker of the normal variability in some cognitive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between brain metabolism decrease in normal aging and changes in structural and functional connectivity
Chételat, Gael; Landeau, Brigitte; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2013), 76

Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related ... [more ▼]

Normal aging is characterized by brain glucose metabolism decline predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. The goal of the present study was to assess whether this change was associated with age-related alteration of white matter (WM) structural integrity and/or functional connectivity. FDG-PET data from 40 young and 57 elderly healthy participants from two research centres (n=49/48 in Centre 1/2) were analyzed. WM volume from T1-weighted MRI (Centre 1), fractional anisotropy from diffusion-tensor imaging (Centre 2), and resting-state fMRI data (Centre 1) were also obtained. Group comparisons were performed within each imaging modality. Then, positive correlations were assessed, within the elderly, between metabolism in the most affected region and the other neuroimaging modalities. Metabolism decline in the elderly predominated in the left inferior frontal junction (LIFJ). LIFJ hypometabolism was significantly associated with macrostructural and microstructural WM disturbances in long association fronto-temporo-occipital fibers, while no relationship was found with functional connectivity. The findings offer new perspectives to understand normal aging processes and open avenues for future studies to explore causality between age-related metabolism and connectivity changes. [less ▲]

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