References of "BOONEN, S"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailErratum to: Management of osteoporosis of the oldest old
Rizzoli, R; Branco, J; Brandi, ML et al

in Osteoporosis International (2014), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailManagement of osteoporosis of the oldest old.
Rizzoli, R.; Branco, J.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2014), 25

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional ... [more ▼]

This consensus article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in geriatric populations. Specifically, it reviews the risk assessment and intervention thresholds, the impact of nutritional deficiencies, fall prevention strategies, pharmacological treatments and their safety considerations, the risks of sub-optimal treatment adherence and strategies for its improvement. INTRODUCTION: This consensus article reviews the therapeutic strategies and management options for the treatment of osteoporosis of the oldest old. This vulnerable segment (persons over 80 years of age) stands to gain substantially from effective anti-osteoporosis treatment, but the under-prescription of these treatments is frequent. METHODS: This report is the result of an ESCEO (European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis) expert working group, which explores some of the reasons for this and presents the arguments to counter these beliefs. The risk assessment of older individuals is briefly reviewed along with the differences between some intervention guidelines. The current evidence on the impact of nutritional deficiencies (i.e. calcium, protein and vitamin D) is presented, as are strategies to prevent falls. One possible reason for the under-prescription of pharmacological treatments for osteoporosis in the oldest old is the perception that anti-fracture efficacy requires long-term treatment. However, a review of the data shows convincing anti-fracture efficacy already by 12 months. RESULTS: The safety profiles of these pharmacological agents are generally satisfactory in this patient segment provided a few precautions are followed. CONCLUSION: These patients should be considered for particular consultation/follow-up procedures in the effort to convince on the benefits of treatment and to allay fears of adverse drug reactions, since poor adherence is a major problem for the success of a strategy for osteoporosis and limits cost-effectiveness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInhibition de la sclérostine par le romosozumab chez des femmes ménopausées ayant une DMO basse : résultats de l'étude de phase 2
Brown, JP; McClung, MR; Grauer, A et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2013), 80(S1), 73

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTools in the assessment of sarcopenia.
Cooper, C.; Fielding, R.; Visser, M. et al

in Calcified Tissue International (2013), 93(3), 201-10

This review provides a framework for the development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential end points that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. While the ... [more ▼]

This review provides a framework for the development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential end points that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. While the clinical relevance of sarcopenia is widely recognized, there is currently no universally accepted definition of the disorder. The development of interventions to alter the natural history of sarcopenia also requires consensus on the most appropriate end points for determining outcomes of clinical importance which might be utilized in intervention studies. We review current approaches to the definition of sarcopenia and the methods used for the assessment of various aspects of physical function in older people. The potential end points of muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle power, and muscle fatigue, as well as the relationships between them, are explored with reference to the availability and practicality of the available methods for measuring these end points in clinical trials. Based on current evidence, none of the four potential outcomes in question is sufficiently comprehensive to recommend as a uniform single outcome in randomized clinical trials. We propose that sarcopenia may be optimally defined (for the purposes of clinical trial inclusion criteria as well as epidemiological studies) using a combination of measures of muscle mass and physical performance. The choice of outcome measures for clinical trials in sarcopenia is more difficult; co-primary outcomes, tailored to the specific intervention in question, may be the best way forward in this difficult but clinically important area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInhibition of sclerostin with romosozumab in postmenopausal women with low BMD : phase 2 trial results
McClung, M; Grauer, A; Boonen, S et al

in Osteoporosis International (2013), 24(1), 38-39

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVitamin D supplementation in elderly or postmenopausal women: a 2013 update of the 2008 recommendations from the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO).
Rizzoli, R.; Boonen, S.; Brandi, M.-L. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2013), 29(4), 305-13

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Vitamin D insufficiency has deleterious consequences on health outcomes. In elderly or postmenopausal women, it may exacerbate osteoporosis. Scope: There is currently no clear consensus on definitions of vitamin D insufficiency or minimal targets for vitamin D concentrations and proposed targets vary with the population. In view of the potential confusion for practitioners on when to treat and what to achieve, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) convened a meeting to provide recommendations for clinical practice, to ensure the optimal management of elderly and postmenopausal women with regard to vitamin D supplementation. Findings: Vitamin D has both skeletal and extra-skeletal benefits. Patients with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-(OH)D) levels <50 nmol/L have increased bone turnover, bone loss, and possibly mineralization defects compared with patients with levels >50 nmol/L. Similar relationships have been reported for frailty, nonvertebral and hip fracture, and all-cause mortality, with poorer outcomes at <50 nmol/L. Conclusion: The ESCEO recommends that 50 nmol/L (i.e. 20 ng/mL) should be the minimal serum 25-(OH)D concentration at the population level and in patients with osteoporosis to ensure optimal bone health. Below this threshold, supplementation is recommended at 800 to 1000 IU/day. Vitamin D supplementation is safe up to 10,000 IU/day (upper limit of safety) resulting in an upper limit of adequacy of 125 nmol/L 25-(OH)D. Daily consumption of calcium- and vitamin-D-fortified food products (e.g. yoghurt or milk) can help improve vitamin D intake. Above the threshold of 50 nmol/L, there is no clear evidence for additional benefits of supplementation. On the other hand, in fragile elderly subjects who are at elevated risk for falls and fracture, the ESCEO recommends a minimal serum 25-(OH)D level of 75 nmol/L (i.e. 30 ng/mL), for the greatest impact on fracture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTreatment of osteoporosis in men.
Kaufman, JM; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Boonen, S et al

in BONE (2013), 53(1), 134-44

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline ... [more ▼]

SUMMARY: Aspects of osteoporosis in men, such as screening and identification strategies, definitions of diagnosis and intervention thresholds, and treatment options (both approved and in the pipeline) are discussed. INTRODUCTION: Awareness of osteoporosis in men is improving, although it remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. A European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) workshop was convened to discuss osteoporosis in men and to provide a report by a panel of experts (the authors). METHODS: A debate with an expert panel on preselected topics was conducted. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Although additional fracture data are needed to endorse the clinical care of osteoporosis in men, consensus views were reached on diagnostic criteria and intervention thresholds. Empirical data in men display similarities with data acquired in women, despite pathophysiological differences, which may not be clinically relevant. Men should receive treatment at a similar 10-year fracture probability as in women. The design of mixed studies may reduce the lag between comparable treatments for osteoporosis in women becoming available in men. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficacy of once-yearly zoledronic acid 5 mg in men with osteoporosis with different levels of serum total testosterone
Boonen, S; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, JM et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012, March), 23(S2), 79-80

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExtraskeletal benefits and risks of calcium, vitamin D and anti-osteoporosis medications.
Body, J.-J.; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2012), 23 Suppl 1

Drugs used for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis exert various favourable and unfavourable extra-skeletal effects whose importance is increasingly recognized notably for treatment selection ... [more ▼]

Drugs used for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis exert various favourable and unfavourable extra-skeletal effects whose importance is increasingly recognized notably for treatment selection. INTRODUCTION: The therapeutic armamentarium for the prevention and the treatment of osteoporosis is increasingly large, and possible extra-skeletal effects of available drugs could influence the choice of a particular compound. METHODS: The present document is the result of a national consensus, based on a systematic and critical review of the literature. RESULTS: Observational research has suggested an inverse relationship between calcium intake and cardiovascular diseases, notably through an effect on blood pressure, but recent data suggest a possible deleterious effect of calcium supplements on cardiovascular risk. Many diverse studies have implicated vitamin D in the pathogenesis of clinically important non-skeletal functions or diseases, especially muscle function, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune diseases and common cancers. The possible effects of oral or intravenous bisphosphonates are well-known. They have been associated with an increased risk of oesophageal cancer or atrial fibrillation, but large-scale studies have not found any association with bisphosphonate use. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators have demonstrated favourable or unfavourable extra-skeletal effects that vary between compounds. Strontium ranelate has a limited number of non-skeletal effects. A reported increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism is not found in observational studies, and very rare cases of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. Denosumab has been introduced recently, and its extra-skeletal effects still have to be assessed. CONCLUSION: Several non-skeletal effects of bone drugs are well demonstrated and influence treatment choices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFracture risk and zoledronic acid therapy in men with osteoporosis
Boonen, S.; REGINSTER, Jean-Yves ULg; Kaufman, J.-M. et al

in New England Journal of Medicine (2012), 367(18), 1714-1723

BACKGROUND: Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Fractures in men are a major health issue, and data on the antifracture efficacy of therapies for osteoporosis in men are limited. We studied the effect of zoledronic acid on fracture risk among men with osteoporosis. METHODS: In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 1199 men with primary or hypogonadism-associated osteoporosis who were 50 to 85 years of age to receive an intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) or placebo at baseline and at 12 months. Participants received daily calcium and vitamin D supplementation. The primary end point was the proportion of participants with one or more new morphometric vertebral fractures over a period of 24 months. RESULTS: The rate of any new morphometric vertebral fracture was 1.6% in the zoledronic acid group and 4.9% in the placebo group over the 24-month period, representing a 67% risk reduction with zoledronic acid (relative risk, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.16 to 0.70; P = 0.002). As compared with men who received placebo, men who received zoledronic acid had fewer moderate-to-severe vertebral fractures (P = 0.03) and less height loss (P = 0.002). Fewer participants who received zoledronic acid had clinical vertebral or nonvertebral fractures, although this difference did not reach significance because of the small number of fractures. Bone mineral density was higher and bone-turnover markers were lower in the men who received zoledronic acid (P<0.05 for both comparisons). Results were similar in men with low serum levels of total testosterone. The zoledronic acid and placebo groups did not differ significantly with respect to the incidence of death (2.6% and 2.9%, respectively) or serious adverse events (25.3% and 25.2%). CONCLUSIONS: Zoledronic acid treatment was associated with a significantly reduced risk of vertebral fracture among men with osteoporosis. (Funded by Novartis Pharma; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00439647.) Copyright © 2012 Massachusetts Medical Society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA randomized, placebo-controlled study of the effects of denosumab for the treatment of men with low bone mineral density
Orwoll, E.; Teglbjærg, C. S.; Langdahl, B. L. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (2012), 97(9), 3161-3169

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of ... [more ▼]

Context: Men with low bone mineral density (BMD) were treated with denosumab. Objective: Our objective was to investigate the effects of denosumab compared with placebo in men with low BMD after 1 yr of treatment. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: This was a placebo-controlled, phase 3 study to investigate the efficacy and safety of denosumab 60 mg every 6 months vs. placebo in men with low BMD. Main Outcome Measure: The primary endpoint was the percent change from baseline in lumbar spine (LS) BMD at month 12. Results: Of the 242 randomized subjects (mean age 65 yr), 228 (94.2%) completed 1 yr of denosumab therapy. After 12 months, denosumab resulted in BMD increases of 5.7% at the LS, 2.4% at the total hip, 2.1% at the femoral neck, 3.1% at the trochanter, and 0.6% at the one third radius (adjusted P≥0.0144 for BMD percent differences at all sites compared with placebo). Sensitivity analyses done by controlling for baseline covariates (such as baseline testosterone levels, BMD T-scores, and 10-yr osteoporotic fracture risk) demonstrated that the results of the primary endpoint were robust. Subgroup analyses indicate that treatment with denosumab was effective across a spectrum of clinical situations. Treatment with denosumab significantly reduced serum CTX levels at d 15 (adjusted P < 0.0001). The incidence of adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions: One year of denosumab therapy in men with low BMD was well tolerated and resulted in a reduction in bone resorption and significant increases in BMD at all skeletal sites assessed. Copyright © 2012 by The Endocrine Society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrailty and sarcopenia : definitions and outcome parameters
Cooper, C; Dere, W; Evans, W et al

in Osteoporosis International (2012), 23

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFirst-generation versus third generation comprehensive geriatric assessment instruments in the acute hospital setting: a comparison of the Minimum Geriatric Screening Tools (MGST) and the interRAI Acute Care (interRAIAC)
WELLENS, N. L.; DESCHODT, M.; FLAMAING, J. et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2011), 15(8), 638-644

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailReduction in incidence of vertebral fractures with once yearly zoledronic acid in men with osteoporosis
Boonen, S.; Kaufman, J. M.; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011), 26(S1), 23

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA phase 3 study of the efficacy and safety of Denosumab in men with low bone mineral density : design of the ADAMO
Orwoll, E.; Stubbe Teglbjaerg, Ch; Langdahl, B. et al

in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research (2011), 26(S1), 511

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNon-pharmacological management of osteoporosis: a consensus of the Belgian Bone Club
Body, J. J.; Bergmann, P.; Boonen, S. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2011), 22(11), 2769-88

This consensus article reviews the various aspects of the non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis, including the effects of nutriments, physical exercise, lifestyle, fall prevention, and hip ... [more ▼]

This consensus article reviews the various aspects of the non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis, including the effects of nutriments, physical exercise, lifestyle, fall prevention, and hip protectors. Vertebroplasty is also briefly reviewed. Non-pharmacological management of osteoporosis is a broad concept. It must be viewed as an essential part of the prevention of fractures from childhood through adulthood and the old age. The topic also includes surgical procedures for the treatment of peripheral and vertebral fractures and the post-fracture rehabilitation. The present document is the result of a consensus, based on a systematic review and a critical appraisal of the literature. Diets deficient in calcium, proteins or vitamin D impair skeletal integrity. The effect of other nutriments is less clear, although an excessive consumption of sodium, caffeine, or fibres exerts negative effects on calcium balance. The deleterious effects of tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption and a low BMI are well accepted. Physical activity is of primary importance to reach optimal peak bone mass but, if numerous studies have shown the beneficial effects of various types of exercise on bone mass, fracture data as an endpoint are scanty. Fall prevention strategies are especially efficient in the community setting, but less evidence is available about their effectiveness in preventing fall-related injuries and fractures. The efficacy of hip protectors remains controversial. This is also true for vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Several randomized controlled studies had reported a short-term advantage of vertebroplasty over medical treatment for pain relief, but these findings have been questioned by recent sham-controlled randomized clinical studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (42 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTaux sérique de vitamine D et réponse au traitement par alendronate
Roux, C.; Chartier, C.; Boonen, S. et al

in Revue du Rhumatisme (2011), 78(S5), 102

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate according to pre-treatment bone turnover.
Collette, Julien ULg; Bruyère, Olivier ULg; Kaufman, J. M. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2010), 21(2), 233-41

Osteoporotic post-menopausal women patients in two randomised trials comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate with placebo were separated into tertiles according to their baseline levels ... [more ▼]

Osteoporotic post-menopausal women patients in two randomised trials comparing the anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate with placebo were separated into tertiles according to their baseline levels of biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption. The vertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate was shown to be independent of baseline bone turnover levels. INTRODUCTION: Bone turnover (BTO) levels vary among women at risk of osteoporotic fracture. Strontium ranelate is an anti-osteoporotic treatment increasing bone formation and reducing bone resorption. It was hypothesised that its anti-fracture efficacy would be independent of baseline BTO levels. METHODS: Post-menopausal women with osteoporosis from two pooled studies were stratified in tertiles according to baseline levels of two BTO markers: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP, n = 4995) and serum C-telopeptide cross-links (sCTX, n = 4891). Vertebral fracture risk was assessed over 3 years with strontium ranelate 2 g/day or placebo. RESULTS: In the placebo group, relative risk of vertebral fractures increased with BTO tertiles by 32% and 24% for patients in the highest tertile for b-ALP and CTX, respectively, compared to those in the lowest tertile. In the strontium ranelate group, incidences of vertebral fracture did not differ significantly across BTO tertiles. Significant reductions in vertebral fractures with strontium ranelate were seen in all tertiles of both markers, with relative risk reductions of 31% to 47% relative to placebo. Risk reduction did not differ among tertiles (b-ALP: p = 0.513; sCTX: p = 0.290). CONCLUSION: The vertebral anti-fracture efficacy of strontium ranelate was independent of baseline BTO levels. Strontium ranelate offers clinical benefits to women across a wide range of metabolic states. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (22 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLoading and skeletal development and maintenance.
Bergmann, P.; Body, J. J.; BOONEN, S. et al

in Journal of Osteoporosis (2010), 2011

Mechanical loading is a major regulator of bone mass and geometry. The osteocytes network is considered the main sensor of loads, through the shear stress generated by strain induced fluid flow in the ... [more ▼]

Mechanical loading is a major regulator of bone mass and geometry. The osteocytes network is considered the main sensor of loads, through the shear stress generated by strain induced fluid flow in the lacuno-canalicular system. Intracellular transduction implies several kinases and phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor. Several extra-cellular mediators, among which NO and prostaglandins are transducing the signal to the effector cells. Disuse results in osteocytes apoptosis and rapid imbalanced bone resorption, leading to severe osteoporosis. Exercising during growth increases peak bone mass, and could be beneficial with regards to osteoporosis later in life, but the gain could be lost if training is abandoned. Exercise programs in adults and seniors have barely significant effects on bone mass and geometry at least at short term. There are few data on a possible additive effect of exercise and drugs in osteoporosis treatment, but disuse could decrease drugs action. Exercise programs proposed for bone health are tedious and compliance is usually low. The most practical advice for patients is to walk a minimum of 30 to 60 minutes per day. Other exercises like swimming or cycling have less effect on bone, but could reduce fracture risk indirectly by maintaining muscle mass and force. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (9 ULg)