References of "BONVOISIN, Catherine"
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See detailCinacalcet treatment at the time of transplantation is associated with a significant risk of delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients
Jouret, François ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; GROSCH, Stéphanie ULg et al

in Transplant International (2014, May), 27(S1), 167

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been implicated in the ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) cascade in heart, liver and brain. Renal I/R occurs at the time of transplantation (Tx), with a deleterious ... [more ▼]

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has been implicated in the ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) cascade in heart, liver and brain. Renal I/R occurs at the time of transplantation (Tx), with a deleterious impact on early graft function. Here, we retrospectively investigated if the use of cinacalcet, a CaSR agonist, in kidney transplant recipients (KTR) influences early graft recovery. All KTR from 2007 to 2012 in our Academic Hospital were prospectively included in a database. Patients actively treated with cinacalcet on the day of Tx were retrospectively identified from this database and matched with controls on (i) type of donor (living [LD], deceased after brain or circulatory death [DCD]); (ii) cold ischemic time (CIT) ` 1 h; (iii) residual diuresis (` 500 ml); and (iv) donor age (` 5 years). Delayed graft function (DGF) was defined as dialysis requirement after Tx. Baseline characteristics were compared between groups with student’s t-test or Chi-2 as appropriate. The endpoint was the percentage of DGF in both groups. Among 337 KTR, 36 (10.7%) were treated with cinacalcet at Tx. Control group included 61 patients. Characteristics of patients and donors are summarized in the table. DGF occurred in 42 and 23% of cinacalcet-treated and control groups, respectively (p = 0.05). These retro- spective observations suggest that CaSR activation at the time of Tx impairs early graft recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailA More Than 20% Increase in Deceased-Donor Organ Procurement and Transplantation Activity After the Use of Donation After Circulatory Death.
Le Dinh, H.; MONARD, Josée ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplantation proceedings (2014), 46(1), 9-13

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Organ procurement and transplant activity from controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD) was evaluated over an 11-year period to determine whether this program influenced the transplant and donation after brain death (DBD) activities. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Deceased donor (DD) procurement and transplant data were prospectively collected in a local database for retrospective review. RESULTS: There was an increasing trend in the potential and actual DCD numbers over time. DCD accounted for 21.9% of the DD pool over 11 years, representing 23.7% and 24.2% of the DD kidney and liver pool, respectively. The DBD retrieval and transplant activity increased during the same time period. Mean conversion rate turning potential into effective DCD donors was 47.3%. Mean DCD donor age was 54.6 years (range, 3-83). Donors >/=60 years old made up 44.1% of the DCD pool. Among referred donors, reasons for nondonation were medical contraindications (33.7%) and family refusals (19%). Mean organ yield per DCD donor was 2.3 organs. Mean total procurement warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes (range, 6-39). In 2012, 17 DCD and 37 DBD procurements were performed in the Liege region, which has slightly >1 million inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: This DCD program implementation enlarged the DD pool and did not compromise the development of DBD programs. The potential DCD pool might be underused and seems to be a valuable organ donor source. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood pressure dipping and arterial stiffness in kidney transplant recipients
XHIGNESSE, Patricia ULg; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2013, October 05)

In 70 kidney transplant recipients, nocturnal blood pressure(BP) nondipping (nondipping or reversed rhythm) was highly frequent (48% were nondippers and 29% had a reversed rhythm). When compared dippers ... [more ▼]

In 70 kidney transplant recipients, nocturnal blood pressure(BP) nondipping (nondipping or reversed rhythm) was highly frequent (48% were nondippers and 29% had a reversed rhythm). When compared dippers, nondippers and reversed, neither BMI, time on hemodialysis, graft survival, eGFR or antihypertensive drugs allowed to distinct the three groups. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) did not differ between groups but calcification score and ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) were significantly the highest in récipients with reversed rhythm. That was also the case in nondippers recipients. [less ▲]

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See detailMasked hypertension is associated with a high cardiovascular risk in hypertensive kidney transplant recipients
XHIGNESSE, Patricia ULg; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (2013, June 16)

Objective: High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for graft function in kidney transplant recipients (KTs) Our aim was to evaluate BP control in the office, but also in the ambulatory and home ... [more ▼]

Objective: High blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for graft function in kidney transplant recipients (KTs) Our aim was to evaluate BP control in the office, but also in the ambulatory and home settings, in stable KTs, ali treated for hypertension, and to characterize patients with masked hypertension (MHT). Design and Method: Three BP measurement techniques were used in 70 late KT patients, (mean age 56.5 years; 43 males): ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM-Spacelab 90207) office (OBP) and home BP monitoring (HBPM)- (OMRON M6). Carotid­ femoral pulse wave velocity was measured (Sphygmocor) as weil as a calcification score (arteries) and the systolic ankle brachial index (ABI) as recommended. The period since transplantation was 6.9±6.6 years, the mean GFR was 65.6±24±ml/min, Body Mass Index was 25.8±4.7 kg/m2 and the number of antihypertensive drug was 2.1±1 pills/d. Results: Uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) remained frequent in our treated population, 46 % were still hypertensive in the office, 39% using ABPM and 43% with HBPM. The proportion of MHT was 22% whatever the out-of-clinic method used, with more males, more overweight (BMI between, 25-30). lnterestingly when compared with controlled KTs (i.e both OBP and Daytime ABP controlled or both OBP and HBP controlled), using either ABPM or Home BP, patients with MHT had significantly higher PWV, a higher aortic augmentation pressure (AP), a higher calcification score and a higher ABI. However we did not find any significant impact of graft survival, immunosuppressive drugs, smoking habits, diabetes, or alcohol use. Conclusion: A high percentage of uncontrolled HTN was noted by OBP, but also by ABPM and HBPM despite antihypertensive treatment. MHT was frequently observed in KTs. This particular HT subtype, either defined by OBP vs ABPM or by OBP vs HBP, was significantly associated with major markers of arterial stiffness. So, MHT is associated with a high cardiovascular (cv) risk and therefore has to be manage to reduce incidence of cv events and graft loss. [less ▲]

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See detailUrinary and dietary sodium and potassium associated with blood pressure control in treated hypertensive kidney transplant recipients: an observational study
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; Gellner, Karen et al

in BMC Nephrology (2012), 13

Background In kidney transplant (Kt) recipients, hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP ... [more ▼]

Background In kidney transplant (Kt) recipients, hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP (OBP) remains frequently used for clinical decisions, however home BP (HBP) have brought a significant improvement in the BP control. Sodium is a modifiable risk factor, many studies accounted for a decrease of BP with a sodium restricted diet. Increased potassium intake has been also recommended in hypertension management. Using an agreement between office and home BP, the present study investigated the relations between the BP control in Kt recipients and their urinary excretion and dietary consumption of sodium and potassium. Methods The BP control defined by OBP <140/90 mmHg and HBP <135/85 mmHg was tested in 70 Kt recipients (mean age 56 +/- 11.5 years; mean graft survival 7 +/- 6.6 years) treated with antihypertensive medications. OBP and HBP were measured with a validated oscillometric device (Omron M6(R)). The 24-hour urinary sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) excretions as well as dietary intakes were compared between controlled and uncontrolled (in office and at home) recipients. Non parametric Wilcoxon Mann--Whitney Test was used for between groups comparisons and Fisher's exact test for frequencies comparisons. Pearson correlation coefficients and paired t-test were used when sample size was >30. Results Using an agreement between OBP and HBP, we identified controlled (21%) and uncontrolled recipients (49%). Major confounding effects susceptible to interfere with the BP regulation did not differ between groups, the amounts of sodium excretion were similar (154 +/- 93 vs 162 +/- 88 mmol/24 h) but uncontrolled patients excreted less potassium (68 +/- 14 vs 54 +/- 20 mmol/24 h; P = 0.029) and had significantly lower potassium intakes (3279 +/- 753 vs 2208 +/- 720 mg/24 h; P = 0.009), associated with a higher urinary Na+/K + ratio. Systolic HBP was inversely and significantly correlated to urinary potassium (r = -0.48; P = 0.002), a positive but non significant relation was observed with urinary sodium (r = 0,30;P = 0.074). Conclusions Half of the treated hypertensive Kt recipients remained uncontrolled in office and at home. Restoring a well-balanced sodium/potassium ratio intakes could be a non pharmacological opportunity to improve blood pressure control. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience
Le Dinh, Hieu ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 667

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival ... [more ▼]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. Methods: This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 80 DCD-KT performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, between Jan 2005 and Dec 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. Results: Overall graft survival was 93.7%, 89.5%, 85% and 81.3% at 3 months, 1 year, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Death-censored graft survival at the corresponding time points was 93.7%, 93.7%, 90.8% and 90.8%. Main cause of graft loss was patient’s death with a functioning graft. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 36% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased post-operative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2, recipient BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration significantly increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailDietary and urinary excretion of sodium and potassium associated with blood pressure control in treated hypertensive kidney transplant patients
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, April 26)

Abstract Background. In kidney transplant (kt) recipients , hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background. In kidney transplant (kt) recipients , hypertension is a major risk for cardiovascular complications but also for graft failure. Blood pressure (BP) control is therefore mandatory. Office BP (OBP) remains the most frequently used for clinical decisions, however home BP (HBP) have brought a significant improvement in the BP control. Sodium is a modifiable risk factor, many studies accounted for a decrease of BP with a sodium restricted diet. Increased potassium intake has been also recommended in hypertension management. Using an agreement between office and home BP, the present study investigated the relations between the BP control in kt recipients and their urinary excretion and dietary consumption of sodium and potassium. Methods. The BP control defined by OBP <140/90 mmHg and HBP <135/85 mmHg was measured in 70 kt recipients (mean age 56 ± 11.5 years; mean graft survival 7 ± 6.6 years) treated with antihypertensive medications. OBP and HBP were measured with a validated oscillometric device (Omron M6â). 24-hour urinary sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) excretion as well as dietary intakes (food recall) were compared between controlled and uncontrolled (in office and at home) recipients. Non parametric Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney Test was used for between groups comparisons and Fisher’s exact test for frequencies comparisons. Results. Using an agreement between OBP and HBP, we identified controlled (21%) and uncontrolled recipients (49%). Major confounding effects susceptible to interfere with the BP regulation did not differ between groups, the amounts of sodium excretion were similar (154 ± 93 vs 162 ± 88 mmol/24h) but uncontrolled patients excreted less potassium (68 ± 14 vs 54 ± 20 mmol/24h; P=0.029) and had significantly lower intakes (3279 ± 753 vs 2208 ± 720 mg/24h; P=0.009), resulting in a higher Na+/K+ ratio. Systolic HBP was inversely and significantly correlated to urinary potassium when age, BMI and urinary sodium were controlled (r= -0.46; P=0.002). When age, BMI and urinary potassium were controlled, a positive relation was observed with urinary sodium (P=0.042). Conclusions. Half of the treated hypertensive kt recipients remained uncontrolled in office and at home. Restoring a well-balanced sodium/potassium ratio intakes could be a non pharmacological opportunity to improve blood pressure control. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after- cardiac-death kidney transplants
LeDinh, H; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2012, March 29)

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on post-transplant outcomes in controlled DCD kidney grafts. Patients and Methods: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidney allo- grafts which have been performed at the University Hospital of Sart Tilman, University of Liège, from Jan 2005 to Dec 2011. Results: Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. No primary non-function grafts were encountered. DGF rate was 36%. Overall graft survivals between groups with and without DGF were 92.4% and 95.1% at 1 year, 92.4% and 91.7% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 91.7% at 5 years (p=ns), respectively. Patients with and without DGF had the same survival rates at the corresponding time points (92.4% and 97.1%, 92.4% and 93.7%, and 84.7% and 93.7%, p=ns, respectively). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower in DGF group compared to non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 ml/min, p=0.001) and up to 1 year post-transplant (46 vs 53 ml/min, p=0.045), but the differ- ence disappeared afterwards (50 vs 48 ml/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 ml/min at 5 years, p=ns). DGF did not increase the risk of acute rejection or surgical complications. 29.6% of recipients with DGF de- veloped acute rejection (biopsy-proven rejection and clinically suspected rejection) compared with 29.2% of recipients without DGF (p=ns). The rate of all surgical complications was 33.3% and 25% in recipients with and without DGF (p=ns). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitaliza- tion in DGF than non-DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days, p=0.000). Donor BMI 􏰤 30 kg/m2􏰁􏰀􏰚􏰌􏰈􏰏􏰥􏰏􏰌􏰝􏰣􏰀􏰕􏰉􏰂􏰀􏰤 30 kg/m2 and pre-transplant dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Conclusions: Apart from longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of DCD kidney allografts. Comparable graft and patient survival, renal function, rejection rate and surgical com- plications were observed between groups with and without DGF. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of kidney transplantation from controlled donors after cardio-circulatory death: a single center experience.
Ledinh, H.; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplant International (2012), 25

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to determine results of kidney transplantation (KT) from controlled donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD). Primary end-points were graft and patient survival, and post-transplant complications. The influence of delayed graft function (DGF) on graft survival and DGF risk factors were analyzed as secondary end-points. This is a retrospective mono-center review of a consecutive series of 59 DCD-KT performed between 2005 and 2010. Overall graft survival was 96.6%, 94.6%, and 90.7% at 3 months, 1 and 3 years, respectively. Main cause of graft loss was patient's death with a functioning graft. No primary nonfunction grafts. Renal graft function was suboptimal at hospital discharge, but nearly normalized at 3 months. DGF was observed in 45.6% of all DCD-KT. DGF significantly increased postoperative length of hospitalization, but had no deleterious impact on graft function or survival. Donor body mass index >/=30 was the only donor factor that was found to significantly increase the risk of DGF (P < 0.05). Despite a higher rate of DGF, controlled DCD-KT offers a valuable contribution to the pool of deceased donor kidney grafts, with comparable mid-term results to those procured after brain death. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed graft function does not harm the future of donation-after-cardiac death in kidney transplantation.
Le Dinh, Hieu; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2012), 44(9), 2795-802

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Delayed graft function (DGF) occurs more frequently in kidney transplants from donation after cardiac death (DCD) than from donation after brain death (DBD). We investigated the effect of DGF on posttransplantation outcomes among grafts from controlled DCD kidneys. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This single-center retrospective study recruited 80 controlled DCD kidneys transplanted from January 2005 to December 2011. Mean patient follow-up was 28.5 months. RESULTS: There were no primary nonfunction grafts; the DGF rate was 35.5%. Overall graft survival rates between groups with versus without DGF were 92.4% and 95.2% at 1 year, 92.4% and 87.1% at 3 years, and 84.7% and 87.1% at 5 years, respectively (P = not significant (NS)). Patients with versus without DGF showed the same survival rates at the corresponding time 92.4% vs 97.2%, 92.4% vs 93.9%, and 84.7% vs 93.9% (P = NS). Estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the DGF compared with the non-DGF group at hospital discharge (29 vs 42 mL/min; P = .00) and at 6 months posttransplantation (46 vs 52 mL/min; P = .04), but the difference disappeared thereafter: 47 vs 52 mL/min at 1 year, 50 vs 48 mL/min at 3 years, and 54 vs 53 mL/min at 5 years (P = NS). DGF did not increase the risk of an acute rejection episode (29.6% vs 30.6%; P = NS) or rate of surgical complications (33.3% vs 26.5%; P = NS). However, DGF prolonged significantly the length of hospitalization in the DGF versus the non- DGF group (18.9 vs 13 days; P = .00). Donor body mass index (BMI) >/= 30 kg/m(2), recipient BMI >/=30 kg/m(2), and pretransplantation dialysis duration increased the risk of DGF upon multivariate logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from the longer hospital stay, DGF had no deleterious impact on the future of kidney allografts from controlled DCD, which showed comparable graft and patient survivals, renal function, rejection rates, and surgical complications as a group without DGF. Therefore, DGF should no longer be considered to be a medical barrier to the use of kidney grafts from controlled DCD. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation entre le contrôle de la pression artérielle et le rapport sodium/potassium urinaire chez les transplantés rénaux hypertendus
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

Poster (2011, December 15)

Design and method : Office blood pressure (OBP) and home BP (HBP) were measured in 70 kidney transplant patients (KT) (43 men/27 women;KT>1 year), all were treated with antihypertensive drugs (mean number ... [more ▼]

Design and method : Office blood pressure (OBP) and home BP (HBP) were measured in 70 kidney transplant patients (KT) (43 men/27 women;KT>1 year), all were treated with antihypertensive drugs (mean number: 2±1). Mean age: 56±11 years, mean graft survival: 7±6.6 years, mean GFR: 65.6±24 ml/min, diabetes:27% and current smoking:11.5%. HBP (Omron M6) was measured during 7 days following the OBP measurement, mean HBP was calculated from day 2 to day 7. Uncontrolled BP was defined by OBP>=140-90 (>=130-80 when diabetes) and HBP>=135-85 (>=130-80 when diabetes). The day of the OBP measurement and the last day of HBP, patients collected 24h- urine and recorded at the same time their food and beverage consumption. Sodium and potassium were measured in urines and their intakes were quantified through food records. Urinary and diet Na+, K+ did not differ between the two urine collections 7 days apart. Results: 16 patients(23%) had controlled BP (OBP and HBP) while 34 (49%) remained with sustained hypertension (SHT) despite treatment, 14 (20%) had masked uncontrolled hypertension (MHT, OBP<140-90 and HBP>=135-85,130-80 if diabetes for both).When comparing the controlled and SHT, no differences were found with age, graft survival, BMI, GFR, calcineurin inhibitors or number and type of antihypertensive drugs. The groups did not differ by their sodium excretion (154±93 vs 162±88 mmol/24h) but well by their K excretion significantly higher in controlled patients (68±17 vs 53±20 mmol/24h,p=0.018) giving a Na/K ratio higher in SHT (3.2±1.3 vs2.2±1.2,p=0.03). Diet analysis showed significantly higher intakes of K (fruits, vegetables) in controlled patients (3279±753 vs 2208±720 mg/24h,p=0.010) whereas both groups consumed on average 9 g/24h of salt. When controlled for age, BMI and Na excretion, Home systolic BP was inversely and significantly correlated with urinary potassium (- 0.46;P=0.002) while no correlation was found with urinary Na.Conclusions: KT patients remaining hypertensive and well controlled patients had both high salt consumption. However, well controlled patients differed by significant higher potassium intakes and excretion. Urinary Na/K ratio could be a useful tool contributing to an optimal BP control in KT patients. However, impact of increasing potassium intakes on uncontrolled BP in KT has to be validated by prospective randomized studies [less ▲]

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See detailAssociation entre le contrôle de la pression artérielle et le rapport sodium/potassium urinaire chez les transplantés rénaux hypertendus
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; SOMJA, Mélanie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

in Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux (2011, December), Hors série 3

Etude de la relation entre le contrôle de la pression artérielle (PA) mesurée en clinique et/ou à domicile chez des transplantés rénaux (Tr) hypertendus et l'excrétion urinaire du sodium (Na), potassium ... [more ▼]

Etude de la relation entre le contrôle de la pression artérielle (PA) mesurée en clinique et/ou à domicile chez des transplantés rénaux (Tr) hypertendus et l'excrétion urinaire du sodium (Na), potassium (K) et de leur rapport (Na/K urinaire et alimentaire) qui pourrait être un indice utile à prendre en compte dans la recherche d'un contrôle efficace de la PA chez les transplantés rénaux. [less ▲]

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See detailContrôle de la pression artérielle (PA) et mesure de la rigidité artérielle (RA) chez des transplantés rénaux (TR) (étude EPARA)
Gellner, Karen; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux (2011, December), Hors série 3

EPARA a étudié le contrôle de la PA au cabinet de consultation et en dehors, et l'état de rigidité artérielle chez des transplantés rénaux stables, greffés depuis plus d'un an. Le contrôle de la PA est ... [more ▼]

EPARA a étudié le contrôle de la PA au cabinet de consultation et en dehors, et l'état de rigidité artérielle chez des transplantés rénaux stables, greffés depuis plus d'un an. Le contrôle de la PA est loin d‘être satisfaisant dans cette population de TR hypertendus, traîtés pour la plupart, particulièrement à domicile. L‘HTA masquée est fréquente, associée à un risque cardio-vasculaire élevé et une rigidité accrue des grosses artères. La PAS centrale est d‘autant plus élevée que la fonction rénale est mauvaise. Proposer de recourir systématiquement à des mesures ambulatoires de PA est hautement conseillé chez ce type de patients! [less ▲]

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See detailReproducibility of blood pressure (BP) measurement techniques in late kidney transplantation (KT): the EPARA study
Gellner, Karen; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

Conference (2011, October 08)

There has been a long debate about appropriate BP measurement techniques for evaluating the quality of BP control, especially in kidney transplantation (KT). Thus, one aim of the present study was to ... [more ▼]

There has been a long debate about appropriate BP measurement techniques for evaluating the quality of BP control, especially in kidney transplantation (KT). Thus, one aim of the present study was to examine 3 methods of BP measurement and their reproducibility over a short period of 8 weeks. Conclusion: Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) should be applied more often also in KT, among others for reasons of better reproducibility over time than office blood pressure monitoring (OBPM). [less ▲]

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See detailWhich factors might explain the divergence between clinic and out-of-clinic blood pressure (BP) in kidney transplantation (KT): the EPARA study?
Gellner, Karen; Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; BONVOISIN, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (2011, October 08)

Differences between clinic and out-of-clinic BP, defined as white coat effect (WCE), white coat hypertension (WCH) or masked hypertension (MH), can leat to misdiagnosis and -handling when decisions are ... [more ▼]

Differences between clinic and out-of-clinic BP, defined as white coat effect (WCE), white coat hypertension (WCH) or masked hypertension (MH), can leat to misdiagnosis and -handling when decisions are solely based on clinic BP measurement. One aim of the study was to examine the risk factors of WCE and MH in late KT. Conclusion:Out-of-clinic BP monitoring should be encouraged to be applied more often in high risk-populations such as KT, especially when risk factors for WCE or MH are present. [less ▲]

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See detailControl of hypertension in renal transplantation : the EPARA study
Gellner, Karen; SAINT-REMY, Annie ULg; WEEKERS, Laurent ULg et al

Conference (2011, June 26)

Blood pressure (BP) is a cardiovascular but also kidney disease risk factor, especially in high risk populations such as kidney transplantated one (KT). Therefore it must be accurately measured. The aim ... [more ▼]

Blood pressure (BP) is a cardiovascular but also kidney disease risk factor, especially in high risk populations such as kidney transplantated one (KT). Therefore it must be accurately measured. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the quality of BP control in such a population followed at the CHU Liège. [less ▲]

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See detailRenal transplantation from living related donors: a single center experience in viet nam.
Ledinh, H.; Detry, Olivier ULg; Pham, M. S. et al

in Transplantation Proceedings (2010), 42(10), 4389-91

INTRODUCTION: End-stage renal disease is a major public health problem in Viet Nam. A cooperative project between the University of Liege, Belgium, and the University of Medicine Pham Ngoc Thach, Ho Chi ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: End-stage renal disease is a major public health problem in Viet Nam. A cooperative project between the University of Liege, Belgium, and the University of Medicine Pham Ngoc Thach, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, has permitted the establishment of an autonomous program of renal transplantation from living-related donors at the Peoples' Hospital No 115. The aim of this paper was to report the primary results of the project and to draw conclusions for the future. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 2004 to July 2008, we performed 33 living-related renal transplantations. Mean ages of donors and recipients were 31.8 +/- 9.5 and 41.6 +/- 13.5 years, respectively. Laparoscopic nephrectomy was performed in 6 donors. The immunosuppressive regimen consisted of three drugs associated with induction therapy using anti-interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody. RESULTS: The 33 donors are in good health at follow-up. Four developed major intra- or postoperative hemorrhage necessitating transfusion, with a surgical re-exploration in 1 donor. Wound infection occurred in 2 donors. Posttransplant recipient and graft survivals at 1 versus 3 years were 82% and 73% versus 82% and 65%, respectively. Eight recipients presented 13 biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes that were reversible in 7, but 1 patient lost his graft due to an irreversible rejection. Two recipients developed cancer. CONCLUSIONS: These initial results have encouraged us to continue the program of renal transplantation from living-related donors. However, they also pointed out the need to develop other donor sources. [less ▲]

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