References of "BLETARD, Noëlla"
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See detailProteomic differential distribution of 53BP1 in serrated and conventional adenomas validated by histological characterisation
QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULg; Merli, Angela-Maria ULg; MASSOT, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2017, February 10)

INTRODUCTION: Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/p) is a precancerous lesion, mostly located in the right side of the colon (cecum, ascending and transverse colon). The difficulty is to visualize this ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/p) is a precancerous lesion, mostly located in the right side of the colon (cecum, ascending and transverse colon). The difficulty is to visualize this lesion during colonoscopy because of its subtle appearance. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We compared proteomes of serrated polyps (SSA/p) and conventional adenomas using residual human formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples. FFPE-FASP method was applied on samples before label free proteomic analysis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one candidate marker was performed for tissue validation on an independent set of samples including: conventional adenomas (low and high-grade dysplasia), serrated polyps (hyperplastic polyps, SSA/p and traditional serrated adenoma) and finally normal colon (taken at the margin of colorectal cancer (CRC) or of diverticular disease). RESULTS: Proteomics provided 765 proteins (out of 5992 proteins identified) significantly discriminating conventional adenomas from serrated lesions. We selected 53BP1 (Tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1) among these for IHC validation, because of its tumor suppressor gene function and role as a mediator of DNA damage checkpoint. 53BP1 appeared significantly up-regulated in proteomes of low and high grade adenomas compared to these of normal tissue and SSA/p. 53BP1 IHC signal was located in the nucleus and the percentage of positive nucleus decreased in serrated polyps, especially in crypts and in the border epithelium, confirming part of the proteomic results. CONCLUSION: This study highlights potential marker proteins, including 53BP1 from which IHC signal was strongly decreased in some serrated polyps. The loss of 53BP1 has been associated with tumour progression and poor prognosis, while little is currently known about its involvement in precancerous CRC lesions. 53BP1 decrease of expression in the nucleus and therefore possible loss of function in some epithelial cells could reflect important changes occurring during dysplasia to neoplasia progression in serrated lesions. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of proteins discriminating inflammation induced dysplasia from simple inflammation in ulcerative colitis by laser capture microdissection and label free proteomics – a pilot study
Merli, Angela-Maria ULg; QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULg; MASSOT, Charlotte ULg et al

Conference (2017, February 09)

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when ... [more ▼]

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when tissue inflammation is present. The aim of this retrospective pilot study was to highlight proteins specifically associated with inflammation induced dysplasia in UC. We performed a pilot experiment on 15 Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples isolated from 5 cases of UC patients with a Polypoïd Pedunculated dysplasia (UC-PP). We compared the proteomes of the UC-PP, the inflammatory (UC-I) and the normal (UC-NL) tissues of each patient. We performed Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) in order to collect only epithelial cells, avoiding inflammatory infiltrating ones. Label free proteomic analysis using a 2D-nanoUPLC coupled with a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap was applied, as well as differential analysis on the paired samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one of the selected proteins of interest was used for validation. Out of 985 quantified proteins, 7 were found significantly more abundant in UC-PP compared to UC-I tissues, with 6 being only detected in UC-PP using proteomics. One of these is Solute Carrier Family 12 member 2 (SLC12A2), also known as Na-K-2Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1), a protein involved in ionic balance, in T-cell migration promotion and in some features involved in cancer development like proliferation, migration or invasion. IHC results obtained were in correlation with proteomic results and showed that SLC12A2 was more abundant in UC-PP tissue than in UC-I and UC-NL tissues, with a signal clearly delimiting the dysplastic region from the surrounding inflammatory tissue. This pilot experiment shows a different proteomic profile in inflammation-associated dysplasia and simple inflammation. This should be replicated using other types of dysplasia in IBD. SLC12A2 could be a potential biomarker of inflammation-associated dysplasia. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of proteins discriminating inflammation induced dysplasia from simple inflammation in ulcerative colitis by laser capture microdissection and label free proteomics – a pilot study
Merli, Angela-Maria ULg; QUESADA-CALVO, Florence ULg; MASSOT, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2017, February 01)

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when ... [more ▼]

Chronic colonic inflammation in ulcerative colitis (UC) may induce dysplasia, which can itself progress and transform into neoplasia. Diagnosis of dysplasia in UC remains difficult particularly when tissue inflammation is present. The aim of this retrospective pilot study was to highlight proteins specifically associated with inflammation induced dysplasia in UC. We performed a pilot experiment on 15 Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples isolated from 5 cases of UC patients with a Polypoïd Pedunculated dysplasia (UC-PP). We compared the proteomes of the UC-PP, the inflammatory (UC-I) and the normal (UC-NL) tissues of each patient. We performed Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) in order to collect only epithelial cells, avoiding inflammatory infiltrating ones. Label free proteomic analysis using a 2D-nanoUPLC coupled with a hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap was applied, as well as differential analysis on the paired samples. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) characterisation of one of the selected proteins of interest was used for validation. Out of 985 quantified proteins, 7 were found significantly more abundant in UC-PP compared to UC-I tissues, with 6 being only detected in UC-PP using proteomics. One of these is Solute Carrier Family 12 member 2 (SLC12A2), also known as Na-K-2Cl co-transporter 1 (NKCC1), a protein involved in ionic balance, in T-cell migration promotion and in some features involved in cancer development like proliferation, migration or invasion. IHC results obtained were in correlation with proteomic results and showed that SLC12A2 was more abundant in UC-PP tissue than in UC-I and UC-NL tissues, with a signal clearly delimiting the dysplastic region from the surrounding inflammatory tissue. This pilot experiment shows a different proteomic profile in inflammation-associated dysplasia and simple inflammation. This should be replicated using other types of dysplasia in IBD. SLC12A2 could be a potential biomarker of inflammation-associated dysplasia. [less ▲]

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See detailUNE INJECTION UNIQUE DE CELLULES STROMALES MESENCHYMATEUSES AU JOUR 3 APRES GREFFE HEPATIQUE EST INSUFFISANTE POUR INDUIRE UNE TOLERANCE OPERATIONNELLE
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2017, January), 30(suppl 1), 812

Introduction: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish donor-specific immunological tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this phase 2 study was test the hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish donor-specific immunological tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this phase 2 study was test the hypothesis of possible induction of operative tolerance by third-party MSC in liver transplant (LT) recipients. Methods: 10 stable and low-risk LT recipients under standard immunosup- pression (Tac-MMF- low dose steroids) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third-party MSCs on post-operative day 3 ` 2. By protocol, progressive weaning of immunosuppression was attempted in patients who did not develop rejection and had normal graft function and month-6 graft biopsy. Tacrolimus was progressively tapered from day 180 to be discontinued by day 270. After day- 270 graft biopsy, MMF was progressively tapered and definitely discontinued by day 365 in the absence of rejection. Results: One patient from the MSC group was excluded from immunosup- pression withdrawal attempt due to HCC recurrence, and the 9 others met the necessary criteria. In one patient, tacrolimus and MMF withdrawal was performed without rejection. In two patients, MMF monotherapy was achieved at month 9, but graft rejection occurred during MMF withdrawal and was successfully treated by tacrolimus reintroduction. In 6 patients, the transam- inases significantly increased during tacrolimus withdrawal. In these cases, withdrawal was cancelled and liver tests normalised after increase of the tacrolimus dose. No graft was lost due to the withdrawal attempt. Conclusion: A single post transplant MSC injection is not sufficient to induce operative tolerance after LT. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of mesenchymal stromal cells after deceased liver transplantation: A phase I-II, open-label, clinical study.
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Journal of Hepatology (2017)

BACKGROUND & AIM: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this prospective, controlled, phase-1 study was to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND & AIM: Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion could be a mean to establish tolerance in solid organ recipients. The aim of this prospective, controlled, phase-1 study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and tolerability of a single infusion of MSCs in liver transplant recipients. METHODS: Ten liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression received 1.5-3x106/kg third-party unrelated MSCs on post-operative day 3+/-2, and were prospectively compared to a control group of 10 liver transplant recipients. As primary end-points, MSC infusional toxicity was evaluated, and infectious and cancerous complications were prospectively recorded until month 12 in both groups. As secondary end-points, rejection rate, month-6 graft biopsies, and peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotyping were compared. Progressive immunosuppression weaning was attempted from month 6 to 12 in MSC recipients. RESULTS: No variation in vital parameters or cytokine release syndrome could be detected during and after MSC infusion. No patient developed impairment of organ functions (including liver graft function) following MSC infusion. No increased rate of opportunistic infection or de novo cancer was detected. As secondary end-points, there was no difference in overall rates of rejection or graft survival. Month-6 biopsies did not demonstrate a difference between groups in the evaluation of rejection according to the Banff criteria, in the fibrosis score or in immunohistochemistry (including Tregs). No difference in peripheral blood lymphocyte typing could be detected. The immunosuppression weaning in MSC recipients was not successful. CONCLUSIONS: No side effect of MSC infusion at day 3 after liver transplant could be detected, but this infusion did not promote tolerance. This study opens the way for further MSC or Treg-based trials in liver transplant recipients. LAY SUMMARY: Therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been proposed as a mean to improve results of solid organ transplantation. One of the potential MSC role could be to induce tolerance after liver transplantation, i.e. allowing the cessation of several medications with severe side effects. This study is the first-in-man use of MSC therapy in 10 liver transplant recipients. This study did not show toxicity after a single MSC infusion but it was not sufficient to allow withdrawal of immunosuppression. [less ▲]

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See detailCancers du pancréas exocrine
DURAN, Unal ULg; brisbois, d; marterne, R. et al

in Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale (2016)

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See detail[18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT imaging of integrin αvβ3 levels in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma
WITHOFS, Nadia ULg; Martinive, Philippe ULg; VANDERICK, Jean ULg et al

in European journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging (2016)

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Our primary objective was to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT performed at baseline and/or after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could predict tumour regression grade (TRG) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Secondary objectives were to compare baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and [18F]FDG uptake, to evaluate the correlation between posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake and tumour microvessel density (MVD) and to determine if [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT could predict disease-free survival. METHODS: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG PET/CT were performed in 32 consecutive patients (23 men, 9 women; mean age 63 +/- 8 years) with LARC before starting any therapy. A posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan was performed in 24 patients after the end of CRT (median interval 7 weeks, range 3 - 15 weeks) and before surgery (median interval 4 days, range 1 - 15 days). RESULTS: All LARC showed uptake of both [18F]FPRGD2 (SUVmax 5.4 +/- 1.5, range 2.7 - 9) and FDG (SUVmax 16.5 +/- 8, range 7.1 - 36.5). There was a moderate positive correlation between [18F]FPRGD2 and FDG SUVmax (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.0026). There was a moderate negative correlation between baseline [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax and the TRG (Spearman's r = -0.37, p = 0.037), and a [18F]FPRGD2 SUVmax of >5.6 identified all patients with a complete response (TRG 0; AUC 0.84, 95 % CI 0.68 - 1, p = 0.029). In the 24 patients who underwent a posttreatment [18F]FPRGD2 PET/CT scan the response index, calculated as [(SUVmax1 - SUVmax2)/SUVmax1] x 100 %, was not associated with TRG. Post-treatment [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was not correlated with tumour MVD. Neither [18F]FPRGD2 nor FDG uptake predicted disease-free survival. CONCLUSION: Baseline [18F]FPRGD2 uptake was correlated with the pathological response in patients with LARC treated with CRT. However, the specificity was too low to consider its clinical routine use. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Transplant International (2015, November), 28(S4), 1027

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone mar- row progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Methods: 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5–3 9 106/kg third party MSC on post-operative day 3 ` 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. This study is in part supported by an ESOT Senior Clinical Research Grant and by the University of Liege. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stromal cells after liver transplantation: a phase 1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 27)

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases ... [more ▼]

Transplanted patients have to deal with numerous side effects of life-long dependence on immunosuppressive drugs. Paradoxically these drugs fail to prevent acute and/or chronic rejection in many cases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent and self-renewing bone marrow progenitors that have been shown both in vitro and in vivo as capable of (i) immunomodulation, (ii) anti-inflammation in case of ischemia/reperfusion injury, and (ii) stimulation of tissue repair. MSC could therefore be very interesting in organ recipients to limit chronic graft damage and to allow tolerance. This study aimed to be the first clinical evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled, phase I study. Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post- operative day 3 ± 2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. This phase I study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in liver transplantation for hepatocarcinoma.
Detry, Olivier ULg; Govaerts, Laurence; De Roover, Arnaud ULg et al

in World journal of gastroenterology : WJG (2015), 21(10), 3049-54

AIM: To evaluate the prognostic value of pretreatment FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with hepatocarcinoma treated by liver transplantation (LT). METHODS: The ... [more ▼]

AIM: To evaluate the prognostic value of pretreatment FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with hepatocarcinoma treated by liver transplantation (LT). METHODS: The authors retrospectively analyzed the data of 27 patients (mean age 58 +/- 9 years) who underwent FDG PET-CT before LT for hepatocarcinoma. Mean follow-up was 26 +/- 18 mo. The FDG PET/CT was performed according to a standard clinical protocol: 4 MBqFDG/kg body weight, uptake 60 min, low-dose non-enhanced CT. The authors measured the SUVmax and SUVmean of the tumor and the normal liver. The tumor/liver activity ratios (RSUVmax and RSUVmean) were tested as prognostic factors and compared to the following conventional prognostic factors: MILAN, CLIP, OKUDA, TNM stage, alphafoetoprotein level, portal thrombosis, size of the largest nodule, tumor differentiation, microvascular invasion, underlying cirrhosis and liver function. RESULTS: Overall and recurrence free survivals were 80.7% and 67.4% at 3 years, and 70.6% and 67.4% at 5 years, respectively. According to a multivariate Cox model, only FDG PET/CT RSUVmax predicted recurrence free survival. Even though the MILAN criteria alone were not predictive, it is worth noting that none of the patients outside the MILAN criteria and with RSUVmax < 1.15 relapsed. CONCLUSION: FDG PET/CT with an RSUVmax cut-off value of 1.15 is a strong prognostic factor for recurrence and death in patients with HCC treated by LT in this retrospective series. Further prospective studies should test whether this metabolic index should be systematically included in the preoperative assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailInfusion of third-party mesenchymal stream cells after liver transplantation: a phase-1, open-label, clinical study
DETRY, Olivier ULg; VANDERMEULEN, Morgan ULg; DELBOUILLE, Marie-Hélène ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2015, March), 78(1), 29

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed ... [more ▼]

Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent bone marrow progenitors that have demonstrated significant immunosuppressive effects in various in vivo and in vitro studies. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. This study aimed to be the first evaluation of the safety and tolerability of MSC infusion after liver transplantation in a prospective, controlled phase-1 study. Patients & Methods: Clinical grade MSCs were locally collected from the bone marrow of unrelated healthy donors. They were cultured in a GMP-compliant lab, underwent extensive quality controls and were frozen for storage in a MSC bank. When needed for patient treatment, MSC were thawed and intravenously injected into patients. 10 liver transplant recipients under standard immunosuppression (TAC-MMF-low dose steroids until day 30) received 1.5-3x106/kg MSC on post-operative day 3±2. These patients were prospectively compared to a group of 10 control (MSC-) liver recipients. Primary endpoints were MSC infusion toxicity, and incidence of cancer and opportunistic infections at month 6. Secondary endpoints were patient and graft survivals and rejection at month 6, as well as the effects of MSC on recipients’ immune function and on immunohistology of at month 6 graft biopsies. Results: No MSC infusional toxicity was observed. Both groups were comparable in terms of donor and recipient characteristics. There was no difference in primary end-points between control and MSC groups. No patient developed de novo cancer. There was no statistical difference in patient and graft survivals or in rejection rates. There was no graft rejection in the MSC group. Month-6 graft biopsies were not different according to Banff and fibrosis scores. Discussion: This phase 1 study showed excellent tolerability and safety of a single infusion of third-party MSC after liver transplantation. There were no graft safety issues and no excess of immunosuppression after MSC injection. Further analyses of consequences of MSC injection on the immune profile are needed. The possibility of avoiding calcineurin-inhibitors with repeated MSC injections as main immunosuppressive therapy and/of tolerance induction by MSC infusion should be investigated by further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPrognostic value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in liver transplantation for hepatocarcinoma.
MEURISSE, Nicolas ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg; Govaerts, L et al

in Transplant International (2014, September), 27(S2), 18-17

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See detailPrognostic value of FDG PET/CT in liver transplantation for hepatocarcinoma
DETRY, Olivier ULg; Govaerts, L; BLETARD, Noëlla ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2014, March), 77(1), 08

AIM : FDG uptake has been shown to predict the outcome in large series of patients with hepatocarcinoma (HCC) in Asia, but few data are available regarding European populations. Our aim was to evaluate ... [more ▼]

AIM : FDG uptake has been shown to predict the outcome in large series of patients with hepatocarcinoma (HCC) in Asia, but few data are available regarding European populations. Our aim was to evaluate the prognostic value of pretreatment FDG PET-CT in patients treated by liver transplantation. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the data of 27 patients (24 M and 3 W, mean age 58 ± 9 years). The mean follow-up was 26 ± 18 months (min 1 month, max 66 months). All patients had an FDG PET-CT before the transplantation. The FDG PET/CT was performed according to a standard clinical protocol: 4 MBqFDG/kg body weight, uptake 60 min., low-dose non-enhanced CT. We measured the SUVmax and SUVmean of the tumor and the normal liver. The tumor/liver activity ratios (RSUVmax and RSUVmean) were tested as prognostic factors and compared to the following conventional prognostic factors: MILAN, CLIP, OKUDA, TNM stage, alphafoetoprotein level, portal thrombosis, size of the largest nodule, tumor differentiation, microvascular invasion, underlying cirrhosis and liver function. Results : The DFS was 87.2% at 1y and 72.1% at 3y. The OS was 85.2% at 1y and 80.7% at 3y. According to an univariate Cox model, RSUVmax, RSUVmean and healthy liver were predictors of DFS and RSUVmax, RSUVmean, size of the largest nodule, CLIP, liver involvement>50%, and healthy liver predicted the OS. According to a multivariate Cox model, only RSUVmax predicted DFS and RSUVmax and liver involvement>50% predicted OS. An ROC analysis of the ratios showed that the 1.15 cut-off for RSUVmax was best for predicting both the DFS (Cox regression:HR 14.4, p=0.02) and OS (HR 5.6, p=0.049). The Kaplan-Meier curves and Logrank tests confirmed those results. Even though the MILAN criteria alone were not predictive, it is worth noting that none of the patients outside the MILAN criteria and with RSUVmax<1.15 relapsed. Conclusions: The RSUVmax is a strong prognostic factor for recurrence and death in patients with HCC treated by liver transplantation with a cut-off value of 1,15. further prospective studies should test whether the metabolic index should be systematically included in the preoperative assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst report of Mortierella wolfii causing human disease
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg; HUWART, Aline ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

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See detailFirst report of Mortierella wolfii causing human disease
LAYIOS, Nathalie ULg; HAYETTE, Marie-Pierre ULg; HUWART, Aline ULg et al

Conference (2013, September)

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See detailThe prognostic value of preoperative FDG PET-CT in hepatocellular carcinoma treated by liver transplantation.
GOVAERTS, L.; DETRY, Olivier ULg; BLETARD, Noëlla ULg et al

in PROCEEDINGS OF THE XVIth SYMPOSIUM OF THE BELGIAN SOCIETY OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE (2013, May)

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