References of "BAUDELET, Christine"
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See detailGlucocorticoids Modulate Tumor Radiation Response through a Decrease in Tumor Oxygen Consumption
Crokart, Nathalie; JORDAN, Bénédicte; BAUDELET, Christine et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2007), 15(13), 6305

Purpose: We hypothesized that glucocorticoids may enhance tumor radiosensitivity by increasing tumor oxygenation (pO2) through inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. <br /> <br />Experimental Design ... [more ▼]

Purpose: We hypothesized that glucocorticoids may enhance tumor radiosensitivity by increasing tumor oxygenation (pO2) through inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. <br /> <br />Experimental Design: The effect of three glucocorticoids (hydrocortisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone) on pO2 was studied in murine TLT liver tumors and FSaII fibrosarcomas. At the time of maximum pO2 (tmax, 30 min after administration), perfusion, oxygen consumption, and radiation sensitivity were studied. Local pO2 measurements were done using electron paramagnetic resonance. The oxygen consumption rate of tumor cells after in vivo glucocorticoid administration was measured using high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance. Tumor perfusion and permeability measurements were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. <br /> <br />Results: All glucocorticoids tested caused a rapid increase in pO2. At tmax, tumor perfusion decreased, indicating that the increase in pO2 was not caused by an increase in oxygen supply. Also at tmax, global oxygen consumption decreased. When irradiation (25 Gy) was applied at tmax, the tumor radiosensitivity was enhanced (regrowth delay increased by a factor of 1.7). <br /> <br />Conclusion: These results show the potential usefulness of the administration of glucocorticoids before irradiation. [less ▲]

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See detailMechanism of reoxygenation after antiangiogenic therapy using SU5416 and its importance for guiding combined antitumor therapy
ANSIAUX, Réginald; BAUDELET, Christine; JORDAN, Bénédicte et al

in Cancer Research (2006), 66(19), 9698704

Emerging preclinical studies support the concept of a transient "normalization" of tumor vasculature during the early stage of antiangiogenic treatment, with possible beneficial effects on associated ... [more ▼]

Emerging preclinical studies support the concept of a transient "normalization" of tumor vasculature during the early stage of antiangiogenic treatment, with possible beneficial effects on associated radiotherapy or chemotherapy. One key issue in this area of research is to determine whether this feature is common to all antiangiogenic drugs and whether the phenomenon occurs in all types of tumors. In the present study, we characterized the evolution of the tumor oxygenation (in transplantable liver tumor and FSAII tumor models) after administration of SU5416, an antagonist of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. SU5416 induced an early increase in tumor oxygenation [measured by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR)], which did not correlate with remodeling of the tumor vasculature (assessed by CD31 labeling using immunohistochemistry) or with tumor perfusion (measured by dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging). Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (measured by EPR) was responsible for this early reoxygenation. Consistent with these unique findings in the tumor microenvironment, we found that SU5416 potentiated tumor response to radiotherapy but not to chemotherapy. In addition to the fact that the characterization of the tumor oxygenation is essential to enable correct application of combined therapies, our results show that the long-term inhibition of oxygen consumption is a potential novel target in this class of compounds. [less ▲]

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See detailReversal of temporal and spatial heterogeneities in tumor perfusion identifies the tumor vascular tone as a tunable variable to improve drug delivery
Martinive, Philippe ULg; DE WEVER, Julie; BOUZIN, Caroline et al

in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics (2006), 5(6), 16207

Maturation of tumor vasculature involves the recruitment of pericytes that protect the endothelial tubes from a variety of stresses, including antiangiogenic drugs. Mural cells also provide mature tumor ... [more ▼]

Maturation of tumor vasculature involves the recruitment of pericytes that protect the endothelial tubes from a variety of stresses, including antiangiogenic drugs. Mural cells also provide mature tumor blood vessels with the ability to either relax or contract in response to substances present in the tumor microenvironment. The observed cyclic alterations in tumor blood flow and the associated deficit in chemotherapeutic drug delivery could in part arise from this vasomodulatory influence. To test this hypothesis, we focused on endothelin-1 (ET-1), which, besides its autocrine effects on tumor cell growth, is a powerful vasoconstrictor. We first document that an ETA receptor antagonist induced relaxation of microdissected tumor arterioles and selectively and quantitatively increased tumor blood flow in experimental tumor models. We then combined dye staining of functional vessels, fluorescent microsphere-based mapping, and magnetic resonance imaging to identify heterogeneities in tumor blood flow and to examine the reversibility of such phenomena. Data from all these techniques concurred to show that administration of an ETA receptor antagonist could reduce the extent of underperfused tumor areas, proving the key role of vessel tone variations in tumor blood flow heterogeneity. We also provide evidence that ETA antagonist administration could, despite an increase in tumor interstitial fluid pressure, improve access of cyclophosphamide to the tumor compartment and significantly influence tumor growth. In conclusion, tumor endogenous ET-1 production participates largely in the temporal and spatial variations in tumor blood flow. ETA antagonist administration may wipe out such heterogeneities, thus representing an adjuvant strategy that could improve the delivery of conventional chemotherapy to tumors. [Mol Cancer Ther 2006;5(6):1620–7] [less ▲]

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See detailBotulinum toxin potentiates cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy
ANSIAUX, Reginald; BAUDELET, Christine; CRON, Greg et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2006), 12(4), 127683

PURPOSE: Structural and functional abnormalities in the tumor vascular network are considered factors of resistance of solid tumors to cytotoxic treatments. To increase the efficacy of anticancer ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: Structural and functional abnormalities in the tumor vascular network are considered factors of resistance of solid tumors to cytotoxic treatments. To increase the efficacy of anticancer treatments, efforts must be made to find new strategies for transiently opening the tumor vascular bed to alleviate tumor hypoxia (source of resistance to radiotherapy) and improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents. We hypothesized that Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) could interfere with neurotransmitter release at the perivascular sympathetic varicosities, leading to inhibition of the neurogenic contractions of tumor vessels and therefore improving tumor perfusion and oxygenation. <br /> <br />EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: To test this hypothesis, BoNT-A was injected locally into mouse tumors (fibrosarcoma FSaII, hepatocarcinoma transplantable liver tumor), and electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to monitor pO(2) in vivo repeatedly for 4 days. Additionally, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure tumor perfusion in vivo. Finally, isolated arteries were mounted in wire myograph to monitor specifically the neurogenic tone developed by arterioles that were co-opted by the surrounding growing tumor cells. <br /> <br />RESULTS: Using these tumor models, we showed that local administration of BoNT-A (two sites; dose, 29 units/kg) substantially increases tumor oxygenation and perfusion, leading to a substantial improvement in the tumor response to radiotherapy (20 Gy of 250-kV radiation) and chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, 50 mg/kg). This observed therapeutic gain results from an opening of the tumor vascular bed by BoNT-A because we showed that BoNT-A could inhibit neurogenic tone in the tumor vasculature. <br /> <br />CONCLUSIONS: The opening of the vascular bed induced by BoNT-A offers a way to significantly increase the response of tumors to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailThalidomide radiosensitizes tumors through early changes in the tumor microenvironment
ANSIAUX, Reginald; BAUDELET, Christine; JORDAN, Bénédicte et al

in Clinical Cancer Research : An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (2005), 15(11), 743-750

Purpose: The aim of this work was to study changes in the tumor microenvironment early after an antiangiogenic treatment using thalidomide (a promising angiogenesis inhibitor in a variety of cancers ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this work was to study changes in the tumor microenvironment early after an antiangiogenic treatment using thalidomide (a promising angiogenesis inhibitor in a variety of cancers), with special focus on a possible normalization of the tumor vasculature that could be exploited to improve radiotherapy. Experimental Design: Tumor oxygenation, perfusion, permeability, interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), and radiation sensitivity were studied in an FSAII tumor model. Mice were treated by daily i.p. injection of thalidomide at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Measurements of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) were carried out using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. Three complementary techniques were used to assess the blood flow inside the tumor: dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, Patent Blue staining, and laser Doppler imaging. IFP was measured by a wick-in-needle technique. Results: Our results show that thalidomide induces tumor reoxygenation within 2 days. This reoxygenation is correlated with a reduction in IFP and an increase in perfusion. These changes can be attributed to extensive vascular remodeling that we observed using CD31 labeling. Conclusions: In summary, the microenvironmental changes induced by thalidomide were sufficient to radio-sensitize tumors. The fact that thalidomide radiosensitization was not observed in vitro, and that in vivo radiosensitization occurred in a narrow time window, lead us to believe that initial vascular normalization by thalidomide accounts for tumor radiosensitization. [less ▲]

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