References of "Böhm, M"
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See detailWhat are subcutaneous adipocytes really good for...?
Klein, j; Permana, P. A.; Owecki, M. et al

in Experimental Dermatology (2007), 16(1), 45-70

Our acute awareness of the cosmetic, psychosocial and sexual importance of subcutaneous adipose tissue contrasts dramatically with how poorly we have understood the biology of this massive, enigmatic ... [more ▼]

Our acute awareness of the cosmetic, psychosocial and sexual importance of subcutaneous adipose tissue contrasts dramatically with how poorly we have understood the biology of this massive, enigmatic, often ignored and much-abused skin compartment. Therefore, it is timely to recall the exciting, steadily growing, yet underappreciated body of evidence that subcutaneous adipocytes are so much more than just 'fat guys', hanging around passively to conspire, at most, against your desperate attempts to maintain ideal weight. Although the subcutis, quantitatively, tends to represent the dominant architectural component of human skin, conventional wisdom confines its biological key functions to those of energy storage, physical buffer, thermoregulation and thermoinsulation. However, already the distribution of human superficial adipose tissue, by itself, questions how justified the popular belief is that 'skin fat' (which actually may be more diverse than often assumed) serves primarily thermoinsulatory purposes. And although the metabolic complications of obesity are well appreciated, our understanding of how exactly subcutaneous adipocytes contribute to extracutaneous disease - and even influence important immune and brain functions! - is far from complete. The increasing insights recently won into subcutaneous adipose tissue as a cytokine depot that regulates innate immunity and cell growth exemplarily serve to illustrate the vast open research expanses that remain to be fully explored in the subcutis. The following public debate carries you from the evolutionary origins and the key functional purposes of adipose tissue, via adipose-derived stem cells and adipokines straight to the neuroendocrine, immunomodulatory and central nervous effects of signals that originate in the subcutis - perhaps, the most underestimated tissue of the human body. The editors are confident that, at the end, you shall agree: No basic scientist and no doctor with a serious interest in skin, and hardly anyone else in the life sciences, can afford to ignore the subcutaneous adipocyte - beyond its ample impact on beauty, benessence and body mass. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of olmesartan medoxomil in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension - The OLMEBEST study
Barrios, V.; Boccanelli, A.; Ewald, S. et al

in Current Medical Research & Opinion (2006), 22(7), 1375-1380

Background and objective: Achieving target BP is important to control the increased cardiovascular risk associated with uncontrolled hypertension. However, failure to respond to therapy is common with all ... [more ▼]

Background and objective: Achieving target BP is important to control the increased cardiovascular risk associated with uncontrolled hypertension. However, failure to respond to therapy is common with all classes of antihypertensive agents. Angiotensin H type I receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) possess many of the positive features of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, with fewer adverse effects. However, many patients fail to respond adequately to low-dose monotherapy. This study examined whether olmesartan medoxomil dose titration and olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy were therapeutically equivalent in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension who had shown an inadequate response to low-dose olmesartan medoxomil monotherapy. Methods: This was a prospective, parallel group, partially randomised, double-blind study set in 463 centres in nine European countries. 2306 male and female adult patients aged 18-75 years with mild to moderate essential hypertension (sitting diastolic BP [DBP] >= 90mm Hg and < 110mm Hg) were enrolled. All enrolled patients received open-label olmesartan medoxomil 20mg once daily for 8 weeks. At the end of this period, patients whose BP had not normalised (sitting DBP >= 90mm Hg) were randomised to receive olmesartan medoxomil monotherapy (40mg once daily, n = 302) or olmesartan medoxomil (20mg once daily)/ hydrochlorothiazide (12.5mg once daily) combination therapy (n = 325) for 4 weeks. The main outcome measure was change in mean sitting DBP during randomised treatment. Results: After 8 weeks of open-label treatment with olmesartan medoxomil 20 mg/day, 76% of patients showed a DBP response (sitting DBP < 90mm Hg or reduction of >= 10mm Hg). During the randomised phase of the study, both treatments were associated with further improvements in sitting SBP/DBP: a reduction of 5.3/5. 1 mm Hg with olmesartan medoxomil 40 mg/day, and a reduction of 10.8/7.9mm Hg with olmesartan medoxomil/thydrochlorothiazide combination therapy. Final mean BPs of 145.3/90.9mm Hg (olmesartan medoxomil 40 mg/day) and 140.7/88.7mm Hg (olmesartan medoxomil 20mg + hydrochlorothiazide) were achieved, compared with a mean BP of 160.8/ 100.5mm Hg at baseline. The two treatments were not therapeutically equivalent. Sitting DBP showed a response and was normalised (< 90mm Hg) in 62% and 47% of olmesartan medoxomil monotherapy patients, respectively. In the combination therapy group, these endpoints were achieved by 71 % (response) and 59% (normalisation) of patients. Treatment with olmesartan medoxomil 40 mg/day was associated with a lower frequency of adverse events than olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy (21.5% vs 28.3%, respectively). Conclusion: For patients who did not achieve adequate BP control after initial treatment with olmesartan medoxomil 20 mg/day, olmesartan medoxomil dose titration (to 40 mg/day) or addition of hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg/day) elicited a sitting DBP response in the majority of patients who had failed to respond to low-dose monotherapy, and normalisation of sitting DBP in approximately 50% of patients. Both these strategies represent effective and well tolerated treatment options in patients who show an inadequate response to low-dose monotherapy with olmesartan medoxomil. [less ▲]

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See detailContinuous aortic flow augmentation - A pilot study of hemodynamic and renal responses to a novel percutaneous intervention in decompensated heart failure
Konstam, M. A.; Czerska, B.; Bohm, M. et al

in Circulation (2005), 112(20), 3107-3114

Background - Diminished aortic flow may induce adverse downstream vascular and renal signals. Investigations in a heart failure animal model have shown that continuous aortic flow augmentation ( CAFA ... [more ▼]

Background - Diminished aortic flow may induce adverse downstream vascular and renal signals. Investigations in a heart failure animal model have shown that continuous aortic flow augmentation ( CAFA) achieves hemodynamic improvement and ventricular unloading, which suggests a novel therapeutic approach to patients with heart failure exacerbation that is inadequately responsive to medical therapy. Methods and Results - We studied 24 patients ( 12 in Europe and 12 in the United States) with heart failure exacerbation and persistent hemodynamic derangement despite intravenous diuretic and inotropic and/or vasodilator treatment. CAFA ( mean +/- SD 1.34 +/- 0.12 L/min) was achieved through percutaneous ( n = 19) or surgical ( n = 5) insertion of the Cancion system, which consists of inflow and outflow cannulas and a magnetically levitated and driven centrifugal pump. Hemodynamic improvement was observed within 1 hour. Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 1413 +/- 453 to 1136 +/- 381 dyne (.) s (.) cm(-5) at 72 hours ( P = 0.0008). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased from 28.5 +/- 4.9 to 19.8 +/- 7.0 mm Hg ( P < 0.0001), and cardiac index ( excluding augmented aortic flow) increased from 1.97 +/- 0.44 to 2.27 +/- 0.43 L (.) min(-1) (.) m(-2) ( P = 0.0013). Serum creatinine trended downward during treatment ( overall P = 0.095). There were 8 complications during treatment, 7 of which were self-limited. Hemodynamics remained improved 24 hours after CAFA discontinuation. Conclusions - In patients with heart failure and persistent hemodynamic derangement despite intravenous inotropic and/or vasodilator therapy, CAFA improved hemodynamics, with a reduction in serum creatinine. CAFA represents a promising, novel mode of treatment for patients who are inadequately responsive to medical therapy. The clinical impact of the observed hemodynamic improvement is currently being explored in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. [less ▲]

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