References of "Avesani, Véronique"
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See detailClostridium difficile infection in elderly nursing home residents.
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg et al

in Anaerobe (in press), 23

Age-related changes in intestinal flora and host defences, the receipt of antibiotic treatment, and the presence of underlying diseases are some of the most common risk factors associated with Clostridium ... [more ▼]

Age-related changes in intestinal flora and host defences, the receipt of antibiotic treatment, and the presence of underlying diseases are some of the most common risk factors associated with Clostridium difficile infection. Therefore, retirement care facilities for elderly people have been pinpointed as frequent sources of contamination. There is only limited data regarding the presence and epidemiology of C. difficile in nursing homes, and this gap in the current literature emphasises the need to gain a better understanding of the situation in order to prevent the emergence of new outbreaks among this population group. [less ▲]

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See detailMultilocus sequence typing analysis and antibiotic resistance of Clostridium difficile strains isolated from retail meat and humans in Belgium
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Avesani, Véronique et al

in Food Microbiology (2014), 42

Clostridium difficile has been isolated from food animals and meat, specially ground pork and ground beef. The recovered isolates were closely related to C. difficile human strains, indicating that ... [more ▼]

Clostridium difficile has been isolated from food animals and meat, specially ground pork and ground beef. The recovered isolates were closely related to C. difficile human strains, indicating that animals and food are possible transmission routes of human C. difficile infection. The main objective of this study was to characterize C. difficile isolates from retail meat and to compare with human isolates recovered from hospital patients in Belgium. Raw meat (beef and pork) was obtained from the retail trade. C. difficile was recovered from 2.3% of the beef samples and from 4.7% of the pork samples. A total of 4 different PCR-ribotypes were identified with a large percentage of types 078 and 014. Resistance to moxifloxacin and erythromycin was detected. The multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) analysis showed that meat and human isolates cluster in the same lineage. This study reveals the presence of toxigenic C. difficile in retail meat in Belgium with predominance PCR-ribotypes 078 and 014, which are among the four most prevalent ribotypes of C. difficile isolated from humans in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailCOMPARISON AND MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF ANIMAL AND HUMAN CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE STRAINS
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2014, May 07)

The main objective of this study was to characterize and compare animal and human C. difficile strains with respect to the PCR-ribotype and the antibiotic resistance. Multilocus sequence typing analysis ... [more ▼]

The main objective of this study was to characterize and compare animal and human C. difficile strains with respect to the PCR-ribotype and the antibiotic resistance. Multilocus sequence typing analysis (MLST) was performed in order to study clonal relationships of the isolates. [less ▲]

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See detailCarriage and acquisition rates of Clostridium difficile in hospitalized horses, including molecular characterization, multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Brévers, Bastien et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the ... [more ▼]

lostridium difficile has been identified as a significant agent of diarrhoea and enterocolitis in both foals and adult horses. Hospitalization, antibiotic therapy or changes in diet may contribute to the development of C. difficile infection. Horses admitted to a care unit are therefore at greater risk of being colonized. The aim of this study was to investigate the carriage of C. difficile in hospitalized horses and the possible influence of some risk factors in colonization. During a seven-month period, faecal samples and data relating the clinical history of horses admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were collected. C. difficile isolates were characterized through toxin profiles, cytotoxicity activity, PCR-ribotyping, antimicrobial resistance and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Ten isolates were obtained with a total of seven different PCR-ribotypes, including PCR-ribotype 014. Five of them were identified as toxinogenic. A high resistance to gentamicin, clindamycin and ceftiofur was found. MLST revealed four different sequencing types (ST), which included ST11, ST26, ST2 and ST15, and phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the isolates clustered in the same lineage. Clinical history suggests that horses frequently harbour toxigenic and non-toxigenic C. difficile and that in most cases they are colonized regardless of the reason for hospitalization; the development of diarrhoea is more unusual. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile: an emerging zoonotic pathogen ?
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Avesani, Véronique et al

Conference (2013, November 21)

Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that remains the main cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in humans after use of antibiotics. C. difficile has also been described in other ... [more ▼]

Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that remains the main cause of nosocomial diarrhoea in humans after use of antibiotics. C. difficile has also been described in other environments outside of hospitals, such as soil, river and seawater samples (Pasquale et al., 2011) and in animals, in which it can also cause enteric disease (Songer and Anderson, 2006). The possibility of transmission of C. difficile pathogenic isolates between animals, environments and humans has been suggested (Janezic et al., 2012). In recent years, the interest in C. difficile in food and in food animals has increased, leading to studying animals as a possible reservoir and a potential risk for food borne infections linked to C. difficile. Studies in various countries have determined differences in the prevalence of C. difficile in animals just before slaughter (Houser et al., 2012; Rodriguez et al., 2012) as well as in retail meat (Houser et al., 2012). In addition, many types, including PCR-ribotype 078, are present in humans, animals and meat (Janezic et al.; Weese et al., 2009). The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of C. difficile at the slaughterhouse and in retail meat. Intestinal and carcass samples were collected from pigs and cattle at a single slaughterhouse. Raw meat (beef and pork) was obtained from the retail trade. C. difficile was isolated in 1% and 9.9% of the pig and cattle intestinal contents and in 7.9% and 7% of cattle and pig carcass samples respectively. From retail meat, C. difficile was recovered from 2.3% of the beef samples and from 4.7% of the pork samples. A total of 21 different PCR-ribotypes were identified with a large percentage of types 078 and 014. This study confirms that animals are carriers of C. difficile at slaughter, and that carcass contamination occurs inside the slaughterhouse. Furthermore the results obtained also reveal the presence of toxigenic C. difficile in retail meat in Belgium with a predominance of isolates correlated with the PCR-ribotypes involved in human C. difficile infections. [less ▲]

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See detailASSOCIATION OF CLASSICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND TARGETED METAGENOMIC ANALYSIS TO EVALUATE THE PRESENCE OF CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE IN A BELGIAN NURSING HOME
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Korsak Koulagenko, Nicolas ULg et al

Conference (2013, October 22)

Increasing age, several co-morbidities, environmental contamination, antibiotic exposure and other intestinal perturbations appear to be the greatest risk factors for C. difficile infection (CDI ... [more ▼]

Increasing age, several co-morbidities, environmental contamination, antibiotic exposure and other intestinal perturbations appear to be the greatest risk factors for C. difficile infection (CDI). Therefore, elderly care home residents are considered particularly vulnerable to CDI. The main objective of this study was to evaluate and follow the prevalence of C. difficile in a Belgian nursing home. During a 4-month period, stool samples from a group of 23 elderly care home residents were collected weekly. A C. difficile microbiological detection scheme was performed along with an overall microbial biodiversity study of the faeces content by Targeted Metagenomic analysis. Surfaces and diary meals were also sampled in order to determinate the possible role of environmental and food contamination in the acquisition of CDI. Culture of samples was performed in a selective medium cycloserine cefoxitin fructose cholate. An identification of the isolated colonies was done by PCR detection of tpi, tcdA, tcdB and cdtA genes. Toxic activity was confirmed by a cytotoxic immunoassay. Further characterization was performed by PCR ribotyping. The Metagenomic analysis was targeted on the v1-v3 hyper-variable region of 16S rDNA. The taxonomical assignment of the populations was performed with MOTHUR and Blast algorithms. C. difficile was not detected in any of the tested meals or surfaces samples. For the stools samples, 6 of the 23 controlled residents were identified as C. difficile carriers. The isolates belonged to 4 different PCR ribotypes, including types 020 and 027. This unique association of classical microbiology protocol with pyrosequencing allowed to follow C. difficile in patients and to identify several other bacterial populations whose abundance is correlated with C. difficile. [less ▲]

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See detailClostridium difficile in young farm animals and slaughter animals in Belgium
Rodriguez Diaz, Cristina ULg; Taminiau, Bernard ULg; Vandebroek, Johan et al

in Anaerobe (2012), 18(6), 621-625

Faecal carriage of Clostridium difficile in healthy animals has been reported recently, especially in piglets and calves. However there is limited data about carriage in animals just prior to slaughter in ... [more ▼]

Faecal carriage of Clostridium difficile in healthy animals has been reported recently, especially in piglets and calves. However there is limited data about carriage in animals just prior to slaughter in Europe. The main objective of this study was to determine the presence of C. difficile in pigs and cattle at the slaughterhouse. C. difficile was isolated in 6.9% of the cattle at the slaughterhouse. None of the pig slaughter samples were positive for C. difficile after an enrichment time of 72 h. For complementary data, a short study was conducted in piglets and calves at farms. C. difficile was more prevalent in piglets (78.3%) than in calves (22.2%) on the farms. Regarding the piglet samples, 27.8% of the positive samples were detected without enrichment of stools. The PCR ribotype 078 was predominant in farm animals. Samples isolated from slaughter cattle presented the widest range in PCR-ribotype variety, and the most prevalent PCR ribotype was 118a UCL. The results of this study confirm that C. difficile is present in slaughter animals in Belgium with a large percentage of toxigenic strains also commonly found in humans. [less ▲]

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